Kit Reviews

AMT 1951 Chevrolet Fleetline

Fleetline1951 CHEVROLET FLEETLINE AMT #AMT-702
VERSIONS: Stock, Custom
MOLDED COLORS: White, Clear, Chrome Plated
SCALE: 1/25 MSRP: $44.95 USD
REISSUE

ENGINE:
The old faithful Stovebolt Six is represented here by a 22-piece assembly with a two-piece three-speed manual at the back end. Engraving is generally good throughout and the detail is crisp and clean. The only part not separate from the engine block is the starter motor. The stock version features a single downdraft carburetor with two piece air cleaner, one-piece exhaust manifold, a two-piece distributor, and the stock Blue Flame-style valve cover, while the custom version has a finned chrome valve cover, dual downdraft carbs on a log manifold with small acorn-style air cleaners, a two-piece magneto, and two- piece tubular exhaust headers. Note that this engine correctly has both upper and lower radiator hoses, something of a rarity when this kit was designed in the mid-1970s!

CHASSIS:
The one-piece frame has a separate front splash pan and center X-member. The rear portion of the wheel housings and trunk lowers are attached to the frame, while the interior bottom has underbody detail to match. Front suspension is an eleven-piece assembly with optional lowered kingpins. Though poseable steering was not a design goal of this kit, it can be made to happen with a little ingenuity. The rear suspension is a nine-piece assembly with separate shocks and a correct torque tube driveshaft. There is no brake detail, but let’s face it, that was rare on mid-1970s American model car kits to begin with. There is a choice of stock single or custom dual exhaust systems, both separate, and both needing to have the tips drilled out for realism. The underhood area is reasonably well attended to, with separate inner fenders and air ducts, battery, and radiator.

WHEELS AND TIRES:
Stock wheels are shallow steelies with plated Bowtie dog dish hub caps shod with vintage AMT Firestone Supreme skinnies. The custom option is chromed deep dish reversed rims with integral Baby Moon hub caps shod with vintage AMT Goodyear Polyglas GT L60-15 wide ovals. INTERIOR: The platform style interior has no items molded in place except for carpet texturing (note that the package shelf is separately molded). The separate side panels have nicely done upholstery engraving and good three dimensional details (door handles, window cranks, and ash trays). Upholstery engraving on the two-piece front bench seat and one-piece rear set is a tad deep but very acceptable. Engraving on the dash is excellent and just begs for some chrome foil treatment to stand out. There is a choice of two steering wheels–stock and plated Eelco-style custom–on a stock steering column with “ball and rod” shifter.

BODY:
AMT’s ’51 Chevy kits are some of their best toolings of the 1970s. The one-piece body is clean and crisp, with the chrome side spears as well as the fluted rear fender trim molded in place. The stock headlight assembly and the optional custom tunneled headlight units are separate plated bezels with clear lenses. Not so with the taillights–these are chrome parts and will need a touch of your favorite clear red paint. The separate hood has a separate plated hood ornament and good underside engraving; however, there are several circular mold marks marring this that stick out like a sore thumb and need to be eradicated. Shared options include chrome exhaust tips and period-correct fender skirts. Custom-only options include front and rear roll pans with optional bumpers and a chromed “wide mouth” grille. DECALS: The new decal sheet only contains six custom scallop designs in silver-gray with blue edging. As seems usual for Round2’s current crop, the decals are matte printed. That’s all, folks.

OTHER:
Included in the collectable tin is a small sheet of chrome foil to help you make all that Fifties glitz stand out, however, there are no instructions on how to use the stuff as in their 100th Anniversary ’57 Chevy Bel Air (see review below.) There is also an excellent 18-page booklet with photos and advertising artwork from the GM archives, done in nostalgic style.

Tom “The Mongoose” McEwen Rail Dragster

85-4908-lgTOM ”THE MONGOO$E” McEWEN RAIL DRAGSTER Revell #4908
VERSIONS: Dragster
MOLDED COLORS: White, Clear, Chrome Plated, Metallic Gray Polyethylene
SCALE: 1/24 MSRP: $21.98 USD
REISSUE

ENGINE:
The 27-piece Ed Pink Hemi is likely one of the best representations of this type of mill in 1/24 scale. It’s much better detailed than the Hemis in other Monogram drag racing kits of the ‘70s, including the Snake and Mongoo$e funny cars and dragsters, and the Cop Out Duster (which really only is the Mongoo$e Duster with a light bar!) Some of the nicer features of this engine unit are the two-piece Lenco transmission, the nicely done valve covers with indentations for the breather units, the blower and intake manifold already pre-drilled for fuel lines, and the one-piece header units with support bar in place and the ends pre-drilled. Monogram tried something new with this kit back when it (and its Snake double) was released in 1974–engine wiring and plumbing molded in flexible polyurethane, and that has been repeated here in this reissue. The parts include the distributor/magneto top with all eight wires molded in place, the oil lines that connect to a pair of externally-mounted oil filters, and the fuel lines (a one-piece unit) encompassing lines to the tank, the fuel pump, lines to the distribution blocks, the lower fuel lines, and the upper fuel lines. As I said before, these are molded on a sprue of gunmetal gray polyethylene. Poly- ethylene is a very flexible plastic, but paint generally does not stick to it very well. There are ways of priming the material–I read once that coating it with thinned white PVA glue works–but I cannot attest to the success of this or any other method. Some of us will likely deep-six the polyethylene parts in favor of doing things the “old school” way–with wire, some parts from the aftermarket and /or parts box, and a little bit of scratchbuilding–and that’s fine too.

CHASSIS:
The Don Garlits rear engine dragster chassis is a one-piece molding with one separate stiffener, side mounted airfoils, and one separate bulkhead/ support–a real testament to Monogram’s ingenuity back in the “good old days.” There are some mold lines here that you’ll want to take some time to clean up. Front suspension is a four-piece assembly based on a chrome tubular dropped front axle, to which attaches a three-piece airfoil. At the rear is a five-piece solid-mounted axle with disc brake calipers, the main section of which is chromed. Also at the rear is an eight-piece airfoil/support/parachute pack assembly–nicely done all in all, though you may need a bit of filler on the underside of the airfoil section. The fuel lines (see section above) attach to a separate plated fuel tank. Interesting that there is an extra front tube axle on the chrome sprue, a bit longer than the one intended for use here.

WHEELS AND TIRES:
At the front is a pair of motorcycle-thin skinny O-ring tires mounted on two-piece chromed Cragar SuperTrick wheels. At the rear is a pair of large no-name slicks mounting on a pair of two-piece deep-dish plated Cragar SuperTrick wheels. M&H and M&H Racemaster white tire markings are provided on the decal sheet for the slicks. Note that on the vinyl sprue with the slicks, you get a free pair of Pro Stock/Pro Mod front tires. Hello, spares box! INTERIOR: All the requisite dragster interior components are here: butterfly steering wheel and column attaching directly to the front axle steering gear, pedals, shifter, and brake lever. The seat and associated roll cage is a three-piece assembly, however, there is no seat detail, upholstery, etc., as Monogram provided a four-piece driver figure intended to fill that space. If you don’t want the driver figure, the seat itself and its associated upholstery must be scratchbuilt, including the belts and harnesses. The seats from nearly any of the 1/25 scale rear engine dragster kits available over the years from AMT, MPC, or Revell are too small, but can be used as a pattern to scratchbuild a new seat. BODY: The basic body comes in two sections: one-piece lower and three-piece upper, which removes to show the internal detail. Simple but effective. Not much more to be said here except make sure you remove the mold lines on the upper body unit as they are quite prominent. DECALS: The decal sheet provides all the markings necessary to replicate the Mongoo$e’s late-1974-75 English Leather-sponsored ride. Well printed and thin, the decals are of excellent quality.

OTHER:
Included in this kit is an excellent six-piece Chrondek “Christmas tree” timer that works nicely in a diorama setting of a dragstrip starting line. PRE- STAGED, STAGED, and CHRONDEK TIMERS letting in white is provided on the decal sheet for this accessory. Also included is a two-piece standing crew figure with his hands over his ears!

1966 Batmobile (Deluxe Edition)

batmobile1966 BATMOBILE (DELUXE EDITION) Polar Lights #POL837
VERSIONS: TV Car
MOLDED COLORS: White, Clear, Chrome Plated
SCALE: 1/25 MSRP: $42.98 USD
MODIFIED REISSUE

ENGINE:
This new edition of last year’s Batmobile kit has two engine options. The first is a 27-piece Ford (or Lincoln) sourced 429 big block with C6 Cruise- O-Matic transmission. The valve covers, domed pie-plate open-element air cleaner, oil pan, and four-barrel carb are all chromed. Despite the high parts count, the overall level of detail is somewhat soft compared to most recent kits from other mainstream manufacturers, but what is here can be painted and plumbed into a fine replica. The second, newer engine choice is a three-piece “jet turbine” engine (remember Robin’s famous line “Atomic batteries to power…turbines to speed” as the Batmobile prepared to get underway?). The turbine may be non-prototypical, even sheer fantasy, but it does look pretty cool in that engine compartment.

CHASSIS:
This new edition of the Bat-car has not one but two chassis units–one for the big block (the more prototypical one) and one for the new turbine engine. Both basic chassis pans have both frame and floorboards integrated into one unit, with the front suspension A-arms molded on place. The big-block chassis has the gas tank molded in while the turbine version has saddle-mount fuel tanks and the rear part of the turbine exhaust system as part of the basic chassis. On both units, the engraving level is minimal but generally good, and reminiscent of the simplified Polar Lights car kits of a few years ago. Front suspension (different for big-block and turbine versions) is an eight-piece assembly with poseable steering. The rear suspension (shared between both versions) is a seven-piece affair with separate shocks and springs. Separate also is the X-member stiffener and the four-piece exhaust system (yes, again, the tips need drilling out for real- ism) on the big-block chassis, and the engine cables/hoses and jet exhaust ducts on the turbine version. The underhood area is a separate inner fender unit (two different units are provided, one for the big block car, one for the turbine ver- sion) that glues to the body from beneath, and has separate fuse boxes, battery, firewall, and master cylinder. The radiator attaches to the chassis and is met by the shroud that is part of the inner fender unit.

WHEELS AND TIRES:
Chromed Rader five-spoke mags with unplated “bat” spinners ride on no-name semi-wide black vinyl tires with decent tread detail.

INTERIOR:
Platform-style, the interior builds up off the chassis floor. Only the transmission hump is molded in place (and this applied to both chassis), all else is separate. The side panels have three-dimensional coves but are bereft of additional detail. The bucket seats have no backs to them, but the backs will not be seen anyway, so in this case the point is moot. The console and rear wall are one piece, to which attach a lever of some kind that isn’t the shifter–and that attaches to the tranny hump. There is a separate fire extinguisher and mounting plate that attaches to the rear cockpit wall. The dash is a one-piece simplified unit that also includes the front wall and pedal faces, and this is well engraved, with a fluted dash pattern. Attaching to this is a three-quarter-rim steering wheel or a full Lincoln/Thunderbird-style steering wheel with horn ring. And yes, Virginia, there’s a Batphone on the console, and even an optional Bat-Ram lever for the dash. No less than nine separate decals–including gauges–go onto this, and two for the half-rim steering wheel!

BODY:
One of the most distinguishable cars in history, the Batmobile’s basic shape is captured well here by Polar Lights. The body itself is one piece, to which attaches a separate finned upper rear deck. Font and rear lower fascias are separate and attack at the break line, making seam cleanup simple. At the front are separate clear headlight lenses, lens covers/turn signal lenses, and two split grilles. At the rear are two split grilles, two variants of the “turbine exhaust” (one with a rear camera attachment), taillight lenses, twin drag chutes, and license plate (this item looks a tad too skinny and you might want to consider replacing it). The longitudinal interior arch between the canopies is a separate component with separate “Bat antler” antennas and a chromed beacon with separate clear lens. The hood has no underside structural detail but does have four ugly mold marks you will want to eradicate. The trunk opens on the model, revealing the famous Mobile Crime Computer, for which there are no less than three separate decals. At the rear deck are the Bat-Rocket launcher tubes (drilled, thankfully) and a small chrome radio antenna. An optional base is included should you prefer using aluminum tubing for the Bat-Rocket tubes, and alternative antenna mounts are given should you prefer using thin wire for the radio antennas. The clear front and rear canopies are nicely done and in this kit, a second rear bubble is provided with an external over-the-canopy arch if so desired. Anyone remembering the episode of the TV series where the Penguin hijacked the Batmobile and made it his “Penguinmobile” will wax nostalgic here, as two Penguin umbrellas are provided for modeling just that vehicle.

DECALS:
On the large decal sheet, besides items mentioned previously, are all the red striping for just about every edge of the car, and these seem to be in a Day-Glo red shade closely approximated by Testors Model Master Chevy Engine Red (really a red-orange). All the Bat motifs for the car’s sides and the wheel centers are included here, as are “Penguinmobile” logos! Three sets of license plates are included, one slightly different shape than the other–all Gotham City, of course: BAT-1, TP-6597, and 2F-3567. OTHER: In addition to all the extra plastic parts, a pair of resin-cast 1/25 scale seated figures of Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder are included, unassembled and unpainted, with their uniform logos on the decal sheet. The real star of this “deluxe” kit is a superbly done sheet of photoetched metal details that include front and rear grilles, Bat wheel spinners, all three Gotham City license plates, dashboard chrome trim, nameplates for all the Bat-gadgets on the dash, door handles, headlight grilles, rear interior deck vent and its associated trim, hood and trunk hinges and supports, gauge faces, Bat emblems for the doors, pedal faces for gas, brake, and clutch, radiator fan (big block version only), upper arch trim lever, center console shifter trim, a Batman TV series logo to display your car with, and the infamous Bat Chain Slicer! Not only that, but the right hand side of the photoetched sheet is toothed to act as a superfine razor saw! Holy superdetail!

Revell 1956 CHEVY DEL RAY

85-4946-lgRevell 1956 CHEVY DEL RAY #4946
VERSIONS: Stock (see text), Street
MOLDED COLORS: White, Clear, Red Clear, Chrome Plated
SCALE: 1/25 MSRP: $21.98 USD
REISSUE

ENGINE:
The Del Ray’s 29-piece engine represents a 265 smallblock with Powerglide automatic, and is extremely well done. Engraving throughout is superb. The instruction sheet does not mention at all that stock engine pieces are in the kit (a faux-pas to be sure, Revell), however, we will take those parts into consideration in this review. Of special note are the separate starter, fuel pump, front cover (with engine mounts), water pump, distributor with vacuum advance and separate coil, oil filler tube, upper and lower radiator hoses, and the correct-for-1956 exhaust manifolds–the familiar “ram’s horn” style did not come into widespread play until the advent of the 283 a year later. Only one intake option is provided, a single four-barrel carb, with a choice between a two-piece stock single-snorkel air cleaner (not mentioned in the instructions, but on the sprue) or a custom two-piece plated “pie plate” low restriction air cleaner. There is also a choice between a stock generator (on the sprue but not mentioned in the instructions) and an alternator. For valve covers, you have a choice between stock Chevy script type (on the sprue but not on the instructions) and a pair of custom finned chrome units. A decal is provided for the oil filter. This is one first rate Mouse motor, and the Powerglide on the end is a real plus for kitbashers. Spend some quality time wiring and detailing it and you have an absolute contest contender.

CHASSIS:
The one-piece chassis pan has frame and floorboards molded in place plus a separate gas tank/spare tire well component. There are two different front suspensions: a five-piece stock unit (on the sprue but not on the instructions) and a five-piece custom assembly with molded-in large diameter disc brakes. There are also two different rear suspensions: a seven-piece stock setup (again, not mentioned in the instructions but on the sprue) and a nine-piece custom assembly with molded-in large diameter disc brakes and raising spacers. Exhaust system is two-piece, requiring only drilling out at the ends. The underhood area is well catered to, with a detailed two-piece radiator unit, detailed firewall, separate washer bottle, two-piece battery and tray, wiper motor, twin horns, and master cylinder. Decals are provided for the radiator tank top, battery top, and the washer bottle top.

WHEELS AND TIRES:
18” O-Z style hollow five-spoke wheels ride on black vinyl wide low profile no-name tires. The stock steelie wheels and chromed dog dish hub caps are still here on the sprues (no mention of these at all in the instructions) and are only missing the proper tires to mount them. These, of course, can either be borrowed from another kit, or found in resin from an aftermarket supplier.

INTERIOR:
The interior is platform style, building up off a basic floor that has the gas pedal, rear seat, and package shelf molded in place. Side panels are separate and have excellent three dimensional detailing. The two-piece front bench seat and molded-in rear seat have excellent upholstery engraving. The dash is a six-piece affair with a chromed central trim insert, chromed under-dash tissue dispenser, steering column with shifter and turn signal stalk, and stock steering wheel with molded-in horn ring. Decals are provided for the main instrument cluster, radio face, Bel Air speaker panel, and clock. The headliner is also catered to, with a separate clear dome light.

BODY:
Revell did a superb job with the body on the Del Ray. The one-piece body has the correct side trim and “Chevrolet” scripts molded into the sides, however, they are very light and almost certainly will get lost under a decent paint job. At the front is a plated grille with separate clear turn signal lenses, plated headlight bezels with separate clear lenses, front valence panel, plated bumper, and optional license plate frame. The hood has separate hinges and very light underside engraving, and on the outside has a separate Chevy crest, V emblem, trim strip, and hood ornament (all chromed). At the rear are a plated rear bumper, two-piece taillight units with red clear lenses, a plated Chevy crest, a plated V emblem, and an optional license plate frame. Door handles, radio antenna, wipers, and two-piece rear view mirror are all separate chrome pieces. All window transparencies are commendably thin and clear.

DECALS:
On the decal sheet, in addition to the items mentioned earlier, are flame designs in yellow for the body sides, two black Chevy bowtie outlines, a silver “California Wheels Pro Touring” motif, two silver Chevrolet scripts for the rear flanks, two silver front fender hash mark trim, two Chevy crests for front and rear, and two California FIFTY6 plates.

Revell 1969 Camaro SS/RS Convertible 2 ‘n 1

85-4929-lg1969 CAMARO SS/RS CONVERTIBLE 2 ‘n 1 Revell #4929
VERSIONS: Stock, Street
MOLDED COLORS: White, Clear, Red Clear, Chrome Plated
SCALE: 1/25
MSRP: $21.98 USD
REISSUE

ENGINE:
The 25-piece big-block Chevy represents the RPO L78 version of the 396 with the Cowl Induction ram-air option. This is the same engine that is in Revell’s Yenko Camaro, albeit in that kit it represents the RPO L72 427, which was for the most part externally identical except for identifying decals. Tooled in the 1989-90 timeframe, the mill features the then standard Monogram practice of molding the oil pan as part of the block halves. The rest of the engine is in newer R-M style, with almost all parts being separate components. Highlights include the separate oil filter, fuel pump, distributor with molded-in vacuum ad- vance, ignition coil, oil filter, two-piece open-element air cleaner, and two-piece Holley 4-barrel carburetor. Two two-piece four-into-one tubular Hooker-style exhaust headers are the only exhaust system in the kit, a holdover from the Yenko. Most Camaro convertibles did not come with factory installed headers; they came with cast iron exhaust manifolds. These can be found in Revell’s stock ‘67 Chevelle SS396, ‘68 Corvette convertible, or ‘69 Yenko Nova or COPO Nova kits. You’ll have to scratchbuild exhaust extensions to meet the main pipes, but that’s not hard to do. Decals are provided for the valve covers (Ton- awanda engine plant #1) and air cleaner. Properly painted, wired, and detailed, this engine can be a real standout. Take the time to give it the TLC it deserves.

CHASSIS:
If you’ve built any of the Revell or Monogram 1990s-vintage ‘69 Camaros, what’s here will be very familiar to you. The basic chassis is nicely done with good engraving throughout, and features the front subframe, wheel housings, and gas tank molded in place, with a separate front crossmember/ engine mount. Front suspension is a five-piece assembly with separate upper A-arms and steering box, with a simplified one-piece lower unit comprising lower control arms, spindles, and tie rod. Rear suspension is a six-piece unit with separate springs and shocks. The two-piece separate exhaust system is the rare Walker chambered unit that has been in every Monogram and Revell ’69 Camaro since the Monogram 1/12 scale Z-28 kit debuted in 1989 and yes, again, the tips must be drilled out so as not to look solid. Though considered a muscle car rarity and therefore collectible, the reality is that the Walker system did not work as well as expected, being loud enough to be a nuisance on the street instead of uplifting the sounds of power–and it was dropped from the option list, replaced by a normal dual exhaust system. The exhaust pipes from Revell’s ‘69 Nova or ‘68 Firebird can be adapted here with minimal fuss. Under the hood, there’s quite a bit of detail, with separate radiator braces, firewall with two-piece master cylinder and brake booster, five-piece radiator assembly with separate hood latch/striker plate, and a clear washer fluid bottle. WHEELS AND TIRES: For the stock version, plated Chevy five-slot Rally wheels ride on no-name (once upon a time, Goodyear Polyglas) black vinyl tires. For the street version, there are two-piece 19” curved spoke billet wheels, riding on no-name black vinyl low-profile tires with good tread detail.

INTERIOR:
The kit’s interior represents the up-level custom interior with the houndstooth upholstery pattern. The basic bucket has the rear seat molded in place with ashtrays on the arm rests and proper droptop dog legs flanking the boot well. The separate side panels feature excellent 3-D detailing. The two-piece front buckets feature delicate texturing on the seat cushion surfaces. A real plus here is that the houndstooth insert patterns are on the decal sheet and are printed as black patterns on a transparent background, giving one the ability to not only do the orange seats of the ‘69 Pace Car, but any other Camaro droptop interior in nearly any other color (black interiors had black houndstooth on white cushion backgrounds, for example). The dash is a three-piece as- sembly with excellent engraving and decalized instrument faces, HVAC controls, radio face, dash emblem, and a tiny odometer decal! The console is a separate component with separate plated shifter–decals are provided for the four console gauge faces and the shift pattern plate.

BODY:
The basic one-piece body is very well done and captures the character of the real car well. Engraved on the body are Camaro, 396, and SS emblems, and unlike the coupe kits, the droptop’s side gills have finely molded trim outlines that will require some careful finessing with the chrome foil of your choice. The one-piece grille represents the Rally Sport style with hidden headlights–the not so great thing about this is that the entire unit (grille, surround, and headlight doors) are molded as a single chrome piece. On the real car, the surround is body color, and the headlight doors have three clear inserts that were meant to allow the headlights to be seen if the doors didn’t open. What this means for the modeler is careful painting. Using some acrylic clear in the headlight doors will simulate the inserts decently. The SS emblem in the center of the grille is of the wrong style; the letters are too square. Fortunately, correct SS emblems are provided on the decal sheet–carefully filing the molded emblem away and using the decal will suffice. Using the three dimensional photoetched one from The Model Car Garage’s ‘69 Camaro detail set would work even better. If you desire a standard (exposed headlight) grille, you can swap one in from any of the Rev- ell Camaro hardtop kits–note that the headlight reflectors for that grille are on the kit’s chrome sprue, another holdover from the Yenko kit. There are two sets of taillights on the red clear sprue–Rally Sport style with an additional horizontal trim bar, and baseline Camaro without the trim bar. A nicely textured boot cover is also included, but surprisingly, there is no up top, despite the fact that a rear window is included on the clear sprue! For those wanting said up-top, it’s avail- able from Time Machine Resin. The hood is the Cowl Induction style with good underside detail, and a separate cold air plenum attachment. The rear mounted flags for the Pace Car are still on the sprues, should you wish to duplicate the white-and-orange ‘69 Indy Pace Car or one of its replicas. The wipers, outside and inside mirrors, and door handles are separate chrome pieces. DECALS: On the kit’s rather large decal sheet, in addition to the items described previously, are hood and deck striping, side “hockey stick” stripes, and wheel well accent striping in black or white, SS emblems in black outline for grille and taillight panel, Camaro, 396, and Camaro SS emblems in silver, a USA-1 plate, two blue California 593 ACW plates, and two black California ZRS 689 plates.

OTHER:
The instruction sheet features a chart of correct factory paint codes for 1969 Camaros, and a detailed explanation of how to use the proper striping decals in what combination.

Monogram 1970 Plymouth Road Runner

RoadRunnerMonogram 1970 Plymouth Road Runner #0892
Note: Our kit review model was built by Damian Fontes.
Visit the Model Cars web site at www.modelcarsmag.com and click on Kit Reviews to see more photos.
VERSIONS: Stock
MOLDED COLORS: White, Clear, Chrome Plated
SCALE: 1/24
MSRP: $16.98 USD
REISSUE

ENGINE:
The 17-piece engine represents a 440 Wedge with the Six Barrel intake option. Considering the age of the tooling, the fit isn’t exactly perfect; however, a small amount of putty and a bit of sanding here and there will fix this. The fan belt, alternator, and fan are all somewhat undersized and would be best replaced for accuracy’s sake–the spares box, and some good photographs of the actual engine, will help here. Additionally, the air cleaner, alternator, and valve covers are all chrome plated, and the factory stock originals weren’t, so removing the plating and painting these parts is all important. Another “need to fix” is the hol- low rear to the oil filter unit attached to the front cover. Decals are provided for the air cleaner’s 440 SIX BARREL logo and a Mopar stripe for the oil filter. Built and detailed, with the few fixes as noted above, the engine looks pretty good.

CHASSIS:
This is typical “Monogram simplified” and is identical to the chassis in their 1982-vintage ‘70 GTX kit and the 1995-vintage ‘70 Superbird. The basic chassis pan has good engraving throughout and has the front A-arms and gas tank molded in place. Front suspension is a simplified one-piece unit that includes the torsion bars. Rear suspension is also a simplified one-piece unit, with the exhaust system molded in. Since the exhaust pipes attach to the rear axle in a very unrealistic manner, simply removing these and gluing them directly to the chassis yields a more realistic installation. The squarish exhaust tips need to be carefully hollowed out to look like anything but a block of solid plastic. The underhood area/engine bay is molded to the body, with a separate radiator wall and radiator. Molded to the engine bay are the battery, expansion tank, and washer fluid reservoir, while a separate master cylinder attaches to the firewall.

WHEELS AND TIRES:
There are two wheel options, both chrome plated. Stock Magnum 500 five-spoke cast types, same as the aforementioned GTX and Superbird kits, or a set of mid-1970s-style Mopar slotted steel wheels with 1970-71-style dog dish hubcaps. Though some ‘70 Road Runners did come from the factory with steelies and dog dishes, these aren’t the right kind. Missing Link Resin Casters offers a set of 1/24 scale steelies and corrected dog dish hubcaps for Revell and Monogram 1/24 scale 1970-71 Plymouths that are far more accurate. Tires are four black vinyl no-names (former Goodyear Steel Belted Radials). Optional on ‘70 Road Runners were Mopar’s Rallye wheels, and if that’s your pleasure, grab a set from the Revell (or Monogram) ‘70 Challenger T/A, ‘71 Hemi ‘Cuda, or ‘71 Plymouth GTX.

INTERIOR:
This is the star of this kit. When R-M planned this upgrade from the 1982-vintage GTX kit, they decided to tool up a whole new state-of-the-art bench seat interior, and the execution of this is very good indeed. The basic in- terior only has the rear seat and package shelf molded in place. Side panels are separate and have superb three-dimensional detailing. Upholstery engraving on the side panels, rear seat, and two-piece front seat is nothing short of excellent. The dash is as the original GTX (and Superbird) with decent engraving and the steering column molded in place. The steering wheel (with delicately molded horn ring) is separate. Also separate is a complete hanging pedal assembly and a chromed pistol grip floor shifter. Decals are provided for the two main gauge faces, but the instruction sheet mistakenly identifies them as part numbers; the numbers actually refer to indicators for these items on the decal sheet.

BODY:
What is here is for all intents and purposes the same body as the 1982-vintage GTX, albeit with the GTX scripts removed. R-M did a good job on the body; the shapes are all there, and it doesn’t look clunky. At the front is a new grille, correct for the Road Runner, with separate clear headlight lenses, and a chromed front bumper with two tiny clear turn signal/running light lenses. Note the L-shaped projections on the front bumper, which are rubberized on the actual car and should be carefully painted accordingly. The rear end has a sepa- rate taillight panel with two plated taillights (Tamiya’s Clear Red makes quick work of these), and a separate plated rear bumper. Note there are no separate clear backup light lenses as there are with the ‘70 GTX kit–those were excised with the Superbird release. The hood gives you the option of mounting the Air Grabber scoop in the open or closed position; the open scoop has the requisite decals for its sides. Dual two-piece plated side mirrors complete the exterior.

DECALS:
Included on the all-new, matte finished(!) decal sheet, in addition to those previously mentioned, are front and rear side marker lenses, PLYMOUTH block letters for the rear panel and a Road Runner script for the grille in silver, lock cylinders in silver, the black panels and striping for the hood and cowl, 440+6 logos for the hood sides, a 440 logo for the rear of the hood bulge (this is the first time that this identifying feature of 1970 Plymouth B-bodies has been done in any kit), stock Road Runner side striping and logos in yellow, rear Road Runner stripes in your choice of black, white, or yellow, two 1970-vintage Plymouth Rapid Transit System logos, a white Plymouth billboard, two red/ pink/yellow custom side stripes and two matching stripes for the hood and cowl, two PLYMOUTH MAKES IT plates (one with yellow lettering, one with blue lettering), two Illinois 440 SIX plates, and two Wisconsin 16441 plates.

Moebius Hudson Hornet

Moebius Hudson Hornet, by Bill Coulter and Len Carsner

Bill Coulter and Len Carsner put together this article featuring the new Moebius Hudson Hornet, that was featured in the October 2011 issue of Model Cars Magazine.

Enjoy!

Simil’R Model Company

SIMIL’R MODEL COMPANY

Simil’R Models is a new model car company from France, and they sent a few of their new kits.

The first one is the Pescarolo Judd 01, in 1/24 scale.

This model is fantastic! It may only be curbside, but the details, quality of the plastic, fit, and the Cartograf decals are top-notch. I am building this one first, since it’s the easiest, and am waiting for the correct Pescarolo Blue color before I continue. I’ll update this article along the way. check out Similr.fr You can also get the Simil’R kits from M&S Hobbies and Strada Sports

AMT 2012 Corvette Convertible

AMT’s new 2012 Corvette Convertible is out, and your humble editor spent a little time on this basic promo-style model kit.

It went together well, and the ScaleFinishes.com Lamborghini Orange paint job really made this model stand out.

 

Revell’s Bass Pro Shops Sprint Car

 

Revell has released a slightly modified version of the Monogram Sprint Car from 1987. The major changes are the newer Gambler style of two-piece body  work, the newer style of top frame rails, and newer rims. Everything is pretty much the same from 1987.

Our thanks go out to Damian Fontes for building up this review sample for us. Mahalo nui loa, Damian!