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Squadron Green Putty


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#1 Chuck Most

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 10:15 AM

I've heard many people in various modeling circles speak of Squadron's Green putty. It seems that a lot of people use it, but I've never heard any specifics about it. How long does it take to cure? Is is comparable to, say, Bondo 2-part bodywork putty? I've never heard anything bad about it, but on the other hand, I've never seen any one go on and on about how GREAT it is, either!

#2 Foxer

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 10:36 AM

I used Squadron Green longer than any other putty, mostly because it was the only game in town I knew of. It is very similar to the one part auto body putties. It does have a solvent that can affect plastic, but so it is generally not detrimental to it's use on plastic. It also shrinks like the devil, just like the one part auto putties. I probably still have a tube of this but I now just use Evercoat Ever-Glaze & Spot Putty for thin body filler. To me, it's virtually the same as Squadron Green in consistency, texture and finish. Bondo spot putty would be the same .. except for color and price!

This is nothing like the 2-part auto putty.

#3 Harry P.

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 11:07 AM

I've heard many people in various modeling circles speak of Squadron's Green putty. It seems that a lot of people use it, but I've never heard any specifics about it. How long does it take to cure? Is is comparable to, say, Bondo 2-part bodywork putty?


ALL
one-part putties–those that you apply straight from the tube, no mixing beforehand–dry via evaporation; that is, the liquid (solvent) evaporates, leaving the solid putty behind. The problem is very simple: If the product hardens via part of the product "going away" after application (the solvent portion of the putty evaporates away), then obviously the putty will shrink as it dries, because it's literally losing a portion of its initial volume as it hardens. Plus, the stuff can seem fully hardened... you sand, prime and paint... and weeks or months later, when the putty has really totally hardened, you start to see evidence of the shrinking under your perfect paint finish. Too late to fix it now!

ALL
two-part putties (Bondo, to name one brand) don't rely on evaporation or drying. They actually cure via a chemical reaction between the resin (the "putty" part) and the hardener, similar to how epoxy cures. Two-part putties cure within a very short time "window," and once the chemical reaction has taken place, that's it. The putty is fully cured, will not cure any further, and since no part of the volume of the applied putty goes away (via evaporation, like one-part putties), there is no shrinkage, and no surprises weeks or months down the road.

What have we learned, class? One part putties BAD. Two part putties GOOD.

Class dismissed.

#4 Foxer

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 02:47 AM

haha ..Harry is SO black and white! B)

In my world there's room for both. Two part is definitely the best but it such a pain in the paper plate to have to mix for a small, thin job. One part is fine in these instances as it quick and easy and the shrinkage is of no consequence on a skim coat.

OK OK .. I will write "shrink: two part dun't, one part do's" 500 times on the blackboard. :)

Edited by Foxer, 14 October 2010 - 02:48 AM.


#5 Harry P.

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 08:22 AM

haha ..Harry is SO black and white! :lol:

In my world there's room for both. Two part is definitely the best but it such a pain in the paper plate to have to mix for a small, thin job. One part is fine in these instances as it quick and easy and the shrinkage is of no consequence on a skim coat.

OK OK .. I will write "shrink: two part dun't, one part do's" 500 times on the blackboard. :D


Make that 1,000 times, just for being a wise guy! ;)

#6 Porky

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 05:17 AM

I myself know of one good place for the green putty, The TRASH CAN !!! I used it when I first started and about gave up on a few projects until the guys in my model club straightened me out as to what to use. I use Evercoat now and am a happy camper.

#7 Porky

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 08:31 AM

Hey Dave

I feel you pain, I have 3 or 4 old projects that I started before I figured out what kind of body filler to use, I would get the body the way I wanted it, let it sit for awhile and then notice that the worked on places were not smooth anymore. Most of them are tossed in boxes now, guess I should drag them out one day, grind all that junk out and start again.

#8 Porky

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 09:14 AM

Hey Mark

You are right about the coat of the Evercoat, I think the quart I have now was about 45.00 when I picked it up a bit over a year ago. I have used maybe half of it to date but I was told as long as it is kept closed up and at a steady temp. not too hot or cold that it should have a much longer shelf life than you mentioned, Again this is what I was told. How would you know if the putty has went bad, just won't set up any longer ???

#9 Chuck Most

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 11:14 AM

Posted Image

Sorry for the pic quote, but yeah- THIS is the stuff I've been using for years, ever since I abandoned that atrocious 'Contour Putty' by Testors. Blech!!! B) Best part is, because I work for an auto parts store, I get it for 20% off! ;)

So basically, steer clear of the green stuff (and the dreaded contour putty and other one-step putties), unless I want to end up with a lumpy, misshapen mess somewhere down the road, right? ;)

#10 Harry P.

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 12:24 PM

So basically, steer clear of the green stuff (and the dreaded contour putty and other one-step putties), unless I want to end up with a lumpy, misshapen mess somewhere down the road, right? :D


Correct, grasshopper. Gold star for you... :D

#11 Modelmartin

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Posted 15 October 2010 - 12:51 PM

Ok, you guys! I guess I have to be the dissenting opinion, here. :D I gots to be keeping it real. :D What's with this grasshopper and gold star stuff?

I have used squadron green, white, 3M blue, etc for a long, long time and have had excellent results. I use it as intended however. It is meant for spots(hence Spot Putty) and very thin sections.

The putty is basically thick lacquer primer. It is an automotive product and should be used like one. I use it in thin sections, let it dry thoroughly and spray lacquer primer over it before putting on color coats. I have 20 and 30 year old paint jobs that have not had the putty shrink underneath. There is nothing wrong with the product if used properly.

When I am doing a lot of bodywork I keep a small jar of unthinned lacquer primer on my bench and apply it to pinholes or small spots with a brush. I have filled up panel lines with it, sanded it smooth and rescribed a new, thinner panel line in it's place. It works great.

For big filling jobs I use a really unusual product :o - Styrene plastic. I make up filler parts to go in gaps and glue them in place with MEK or volatile solvent/glue. Failing that I like Milliput Epoxy putty. It is much cheaper and I think better than Tamiya 2-part. I have used fine grained bondo and that is pretty good but very sloppy. The Milliput can be shaped very nicely and has a lengthy working time. It doesn't feather edge well that is where the Spot putty comes in.

That's what I know.

#12 Harry P.

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Posted 16 October 2010 - 08:28 AM

On the Bondo tube glazing putty...

The one-part and two-part types look very much alike, but you can easily tell the difference.

The one-part stuff (what you DON'T want) is sold as "Glazing and Spot Putty."

The two-part stuff (which is the one you want) is labeled "Professional Glazing and Spot Putty".