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Garage Dio(Getting started!)


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#21 nboldman

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 05:26 PM

One of them will be on my want list. An air compressor doesn't happen to come in that kit???

Edited by nboldman, 20 July 2012 - 04:51 PM.


#22 JamesW

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 05:32 PM

Nope, no compressor. However, there are MANY vendors that have compressors.

http://www.scalemode...cessories3a.htm

I like this one because it comes with a spray gun. Look under diorama.

http://www.thepartsbox.com/

#23 nboldman

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 01:00 PM

Going to get some basswood tomorrow since its on sale, as the balsa was just way to flimsy! next question, whats the best way to glue basswood?

#24 GTMust

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 03:02 AM

Elmer's school (white) glue will work just fine and will dry clear. You could also use regular carpenter's glue but that dries cream colored. (I still think you'd be better with the foamcore board........)

Tony

#25 MichaelJ

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 02:49 AM

just so i know whats the easiest and best way to glue the balsa wood to each other for the frame? wood glue? hot glue? White glue? tack nails? which would be the best way of doing this? thanks

nathan.

Brown ELMER'S wood. Hold's like a bat out'a ____! Just my pref. Michaelj...

#26 nboldman

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 04:50 PM

Got 3 walls of 7 togther today.
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sorry about the clamp in the way of the picture. had to reglue one of the pieces of basswood.

#27 nboldman

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 04:38 PM

Got some more done, just not to much. The front wall is done along with the base being cut. Base is 30x30. Heres the pcs:Posted Image
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Plenty of room for a car or truck even with a dually or crew cab truck.
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Now the next question, what it the best way to replicate concrete on the wood surface? Now i do have an airbrush so weathering and painting it wouldnt be a problem and the wood is already sanded. So thats my question.

Thanks for looking.

#28 GTMust

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 05:38 AM

Now I see the way you're constructing the walls, I understand why you have been against the use of Foamcore sheets. You are doing a good, neat job on the actual construction, keeping everything square and true with barely any excess glue. Nice work.

Now I'm curious though.... perhaps some other members can shed some light on this........ Would a commercial service garage of this size have been constructed with timber framing in reality? This is not a criticism of the way you're going, but more to satisfy my own curiosity. The design would indicate a building in the 1930's era or newer........ as opposed to an earlier 1900 to 1920 era, which may have been of wood construction, but a lot smaller.

Are you going to cover the inside and outside as a finished surface or leave the wood framing exposed inside?

Tony

#29 nboldman

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 02:18 PM

I will be covering the outside woth either brick or a styrene sheet woth a vinyl siding design. As far as the inside goes I might do a covering on the inside of the garage itslef, but the office will have some sort of covering.

Thanks.

#30 nboldman

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 01:40 PM

Well ive got all of the walls built. and mocked them up using clamps so there straight. Stilll need tto figure out how i want to do the concrete and asphalt. Heres the pictures:Posted Image
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Thanks for looking!!!

#31 charlie8575

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Posted 29 July 2012 - 10:01 PM

Nathan,

1. Really nice job on the studding.
2. Funny- I'd be the opposite of your dad, I'd be pushing you to the workbench! You and Dad need to start a dialogue. Explain why you're doing what you're doing, and help him understand this is your interest, your passion, and your pursuit. Sports is cool, if you're into it, but you need to keep diverse interests, lest you suffer from burnout.
3. Basswood is the better choice for this work, absolutely. You might want to consider putting some sealer over the wood to make sure it doesn't warp, splinter, etc. Clear spray lacquer in a flat finish, available at any hardware store for short money, would do just fine.
4. As Tony Suggested, plain old Elmer's glue will be fine if you're doing wood-to-wood or wood-to-paper or cardboard. If you're using another material, such as plastic, I would suggest slow-set epoxy to give you some working time.

To answer Tony's question, it's entirely possible an early garage could have been wood-framed, as many of them were converted barns, stables and other older commercial buildings. It was, and still is, somewhat common, to also build brick or concrete-faced wooden-frame buildings, although less so now for buildings like this in modern times, but it would have been seen in fairly regular use, I would say into the 1940s or '50s in rural areas, anyway, perhaps an occasional suburban/city location, too.

Charlie Larkin

#32 nboldman

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 09:06 AM

Since im organizing my photobucket, heres all of the photos again.
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