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Future Freightliner?


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#1 BigBad

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:42 PM

So you hate aero trucks, don't like the rounded spoilers, side skirts, hidden fuel tanks and air filters? I hate to say this to you, but you ain't seen nothin' yet.
See what's coming up, watch this:



#2 Jim B

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:59 PM

I've seen that video. I think the truck looks sort of like the early Ford F-Series COEs.

#3 BigBad

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 03:01 PM

I've seen that video. I think the truck looks sort of like the early Ford F-Series COEs.

Well I'll be... When you squint... It does look like it doesn't it?

#4 Chuck Most

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 03:34 PM

Well I'll be... When you squint... It does look like it doesn't it?

Now imagine it with the grille from the Ford Bronco concept truck from a few years back...

#5 tooltas

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 03:44 PM

it kindad cool looking

#6 DRWho95

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 08:41 PM

it's certainly an interesting concept but then again thats what it is a concept it'll go through the drawing board a few more times before they actually get to releasing it (whatever it is) lol

#7 Badluck 13

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 04:15 AM

I've seen that video. I think the truck looks sort of like the early Ford F-Series COEs.

It does have that F-series look to it..........some ways I like it.....some ways I don't,sleeper area for one,kinda going back to the early days there......

#8 lapazleo

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 10:50 AM

Freightliner hasn't built a good looking truck in years.

#9 camaro68

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 02:41 PM

I was impressed and it takes a lot to impress me :blink:

#10 george 53

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 02:51 PM

Heck, I still think the T-1000 was a BEAUTIFUL truck, but, hey, not too many others must've, cause the even quit building it! What a shame, first semi tractor that i EVER thought was stylish AND beautiful!!!

#11 Wagoneer81

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 05:09 PM

I like the exterior looks. Definitely has an old Ford/ Chevy COE look to it... that's about as far as I go with this one. The single seat, single door? The 24" wide convertible bunk? 'Back door'? Rear facing cameras vs. mirrors? Have any of these engineers ever spent any amount of time in a big rig, over the road? I'd say... no. Looks very uncomfortable for someone who spends any amount of time on the road. It has shorthaul possibilites, that's about all the farther I'd want to take it. Then again, when I was on the road, I might be out for two weeks at a time and rarely saw a hotel room. I did love my 60" double bunks. Center mounted display screen with a menu system? Why not bring back texting and driving for the amount of time you are distracted while scrolling through the menu..

I do like the use of the sculpted LED signal lights and the use of the cold rolled aluminum frame components for weigh savings. I guess it is a decent compromise between the daycab and longhaul sleeper cabs. Having said all this, I am anxious to see where they go with this design, from concept to production.

Yes, some very wild concepts and ideas. Applicable for an OTR truck? I don't think so. Just my opinion. Anyone else? This may become a good conversation piece...

Edited by Wagoneer81, 30 August 2012 - 05:16 PM.


#12 BigBad

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 07:10 AM

It is a good conversation piece! I like trucks, unfortunately for me and fortunately for everybody else, I don't drive a truck. I'm not too sure about the styling, while it does remind me of older 50's

styled trucks, it's a little over the edge even for me. I agree that it would be an evolution of the already very streamlined Cascadia, but even that truck doesn't stir my insides. The prototype does stir

me but not in a good way! You know, a prototype is a concept to test all kinds of things like feasability, public opinion, proof of concept. So a lot of the ideas put forth on this truck are going to be

used in some new future trucks and some are not and others are going to be offered as options. So I wouldn't worry too much about it. Besides, this type of truck is going to be destined to fleets

anyway, right? The Kenworth T600, T2000 and later Volvo VN's were pretty much out of this world when they came out too! Just my 2 cents.

#13 dad vader

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Posted 01 September 2012 - 09:33 AM

the use of the cold rolled aluminum frame components for weight savings,

Great for saving weight also really good at cracking!!!!Ever have to change a frame rail under warranty guidelines,Not alot of fun,and takes alot of manpower.It seems Freightliner has not taken any of the lessons learned by the Paccar corp to heart....There is a reason why all heavy American truck builder abandoned the concept.US roads are too rough and US drivers/companys insist on putting as much weight on the truck as they can.

And as for me personally I would prefer a well painted and maintaned W900 or extended hood Pete 379/389,with dual Vortec air cleaners and some 6 inch chimneys,for real class...

Edited by dad vader, 01 September 2012 - 09:38 AM.


#14 niteowl7710

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 04:03 PM

It might have more application than you'd expect. More and more companies are focusing on a more Regionalized approach to their freight hauling. In either soliciting more "medium haul" freight (550 miles or less) or relaying "long haul" freight through several operation centers between several drivers to get it across the country. You consider the two largest trucking fleets don't need sleepers at all (UPS & FedEx).

Wal*Mart has tailored their private fleet as well as their 3PL grocery haulers to operate in a radius of less than 300 miles from the Distribution Center. If my car got better mileage and/or I lived closer to the D.C. I could go home everyday, my loads are out and back, and if I didn't HAVE to sleep in the truck, I wouldn't need a sleeper either. Not gonna say I mind my Cascadia Condo though... B)

Plus you have to take into consideration a whole new "generation" of what we call "White Collar Truckers" that have been coming into the industry. These are people who didn't select driving as a vocation like some of us. I got my CDL Permit the day after my 21st B-Day, and was OTR at Werner a month later. But rather people who are finding trucking because it's steady employment after being laid off from corporate jobs. These people don't want to be out for 3 weeks at a time, they don't want to sleep in trucks, they don't want to fight for parking spots in truck stops. Hence more and more "Be home weekly, be home daily" type of operations are being foisted on us guys who enjoy racking up the "Tall Miles". My family situation (the fact that new little members keep being added) has forced me into a more hometime operation, but believe you me I'd love to hit the road again once all these rug-rats hit 18. I kind of wonder if Long Haul OTR operations will still exist then.

#15 Chuck Most

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 04:21 PM

What James says makes me wonder- in a lot of ways, trucking is becoming more of a 'punch in, punch out' kind of job than it has been in the past. Even a lot of the old-timers I know who were diehard OTR guys for years are taking jobs with more localized routes. There's always going to be a need for long haul trucks (and folks to drive them), but it seems like trucking is becoming less specialised. I've noticed that even the trucks are beginning to reflect that- nowadays you can get heavy trucks with automatic or clutchless manual transmissions, meaning that just learning how to operate the truck wouldn't require as much skill as in the past.

#16 lapazleo

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 04:27 PM

Good point you rarely see big bunks in Europe in England your limited how far you go unless your'e a transcontinental driver. So many new school drivers consider trucking a job not a lifestyle. Also weight sensitive operations need smaller bunks. We used to run coast to coast with little coffin sleeper cabovers solo and team we survived.

#17 JamesW

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 06:46 PM

Not a bad idea with interior design. Without a fullsize sleeper it shortens the wheelbase, which will make it easier to maneuver. Exterior design on the other hand, is not very desirable.

#18 mredzadventure

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 03:39 AM

Ive been at this game for about 16 years and what I've learned is the bottom line. For myself and who I drive for. This is the only industry I know that say's don't give me more money for what I do .Give me more to do. 95 % of my work has been local and I have consistently made more money then the guy's I know who drive OTR. Freight is so cut throat you get paid squat. I've found you do something more then just sit behind the wheel you be better paid. If you can do a job with the truck your more valuable. I drive a Mack Vision day cab and a hazardous waste tanker.I would not trade it for any other truck on the road . That little truck has made me more money then another I've ever drove. Long haul day's are numbered Ive seen more big warehouses going up and with a lot of stuff moving on inter-model you'll be able to move it cheaper. The cost of theses big trucks is going to be to much. We just bought three new Freight-shakers almost $130000 a piece. There to heavy for what we do. All of the new computer controlled emissions system adding cost and service problems. The trucks are nice to look at and pretty good to drive but I bet in the long run you could price it right with a good day cab. It's getting pretty pricey to live out on the road and with the low wages for some I can't see doing it.

What James says makes me wonder- in a lot of ways, trucking is becoming more of a 'punch in, punch out' kind of job than it has been in the past. Even a lot of the old-timers I know who were diehard OTR guys for years are taking jobs with more localized routes. There's always going to be a need for long haul trucks (and folks to drive them), but it seems like trucking is becoming less specialised. I've noticed that even the trucks are beginning to reflect that- nowadays you can get heavy trucks with automatic or clutchless manual transmissions, meaning that just learning how to operate the truck wouldn't require as much skill as in the past.


Edited by mredzadventure, 09 September 2012 - 03:40 AM.


#19 darquewanderer

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 04:05 AM

While I agree that is a very interesting and innovative design, I am mystified by the "designed for the younger drivers" statement.

Young drivers buying new trucks is a very, very small part of the overall class 6, 7 and 8 market.

New trucks are generally bought by companies with one of two philosophies, neither concern the drivers. The first is getting the highest return on their investment 2 to 4 years down the road. The second is without concern of return, in other words, buy as cheaply as possible, run the piss out of it for 5 or 10 years if not longer, then dump the worn out carcass on the used market.

I've driven for both types of companies and while neither cared about driver needs, the one that looks to future return was by far a better choice.

And I worked for one company that seriously concidered day cabs for the interstate branch, with drivers having to use a board across the seats to sleep on. The threat of 300 plus drivers walking off the job put an end to that stupidity.

The concern for younger drivers is nice, but in the real world, if they want it to succeed they will need other selling points, otherwise they will have little more than a stylish and innovative white elephant.

#20 Jim B

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 12:57 PM

That's what they said about the Kenworth T600 when it came out in the 1980s.