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Failed tutorial - but still kinda cool


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#1 Jantrix

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:08 PM

First off this tutorial is NOT of a successful paint technique. This attempt was a failure. Not an abysmal failure, but not what I intended. But, I still think this can work. Step into Robby-land and have a look.

 

Okay, I've wanted to try this type of paint job forever. I don't know what it's called, I just know I like it. The theory is this. Model under the water, spray surface of water, pull model through the paint slick for a cool easter egg looking pattern.

 

However I wanted to try to take the pulling the model out of the water step out of the equation so I don't have to worry about pulling too fast or slow.

 

So I came up with this. Idea.

 

Step 1. Paint model in a light color. Krylon Pebble tan this time.

 

2012-12-20170227.jpg

 

Step 2. Drill hole in bucket and put a piece of tape over it.

 

2012-12-20170508.jpg

 

Step 3. Duct tape model (on a stand) to bottom of bucket and fill the bucket with with water. This here is where I went wrong.

 

2012-12-20171846.jpg

 

Step 4. Spray surface of water with paint.

 

2012-12-20172224.jpg

 

2012-12-20171858.jpg


Edited by Jantrix, 20 December 2012 - 01:25 PM.


#2 Jantrix

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:14 PM

Step 5. Remove tape over hole. Let water drain from bucket. In my minds eye I saw a nice level descent of the water. What I didn't account for was the paint adhering to the side of the bucket and pulling away from the center of the bucket where I needed it, as you can see in the following pics.

 

2012-12-20172215.jpg

 

2012-12-20172247.jpg

 

2012-12-20172406.jpg

 

2012-12-20172425.jpg


Edited by Jantrix, 20 December 2012 - 02:07 PM.


#3 Jantrix

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:19 PM

Well here's what I ended up with.

 

2012-12-20173743.jpg

 

2012-12-20173733.jpg

 

2012-12-20173753.jpg

 

I still think it's kinda cool and I may well leave it as is. However it was not as successful as I'd hoped. 

However I do think this method can work. My mistake? Was too much water above the model. If I had only 1/2 inch of water over the model, I don't think I would have lost as much paint on the sides of the bucket and it would have covered the car. More soon!

 

My next attempt will be a yellow/blue/red blend over a Revell 41 Willys.


Edited by Jantrix, 20 December 2012 - 01:20 PM.


#4 clavender17

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:25 PM

This is pretty awesome !!! I'm gonna have to try this

#5 crazyjim

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:28 PM

You wasted a good bucket, Rob.  I've done this in the past.  I filled a bucket with water, sprayed the paint over the surface, dipped the model into the paint, used a paint stir to get rid of the excess paint, and lifted the model out.  Works every time.



#6 Jantrix

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:31 PM

Nope, the paint was mostly dry, it scrubbed right off. 



#7 uncle potts

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:54 PM

You wasted a good bucket, Rob.  I've done this in the past.  I filled a bucket with water, sprayed the paint over the surface, dipped the model into the paint, used a paint stir to get rid of the excess paint, and lifted the model out.  Works every time.

 

 

This is the way I did it also, works every time. Also warm water helps keep the paint from setting up too quickly.



#8 Jantrix

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 03:16 PM

 

 

This is the way I did it also, works every time. Also warm water helps keep the paint from setting up too quick

 

 

I was concerned that pushing it down or lifting to slowly/quickly could cause issues, tearing the film like I did n in this instance. I was trying to take the "human factor" out of the equation. Thanks for your comments guys.



#9 pandamonium2112

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:44 PM

I think it's an awsome idea and the paint is still pretty cool.

 

After reading the tutorial though, i got a few ideas to pass on to you.

 

1. I think a base coat of paint before the water trick might help a little.

 

2. Draw a line about 5-6 inches up from the bottom of the bucket and cut with a sharp jig saw. you won't loose so much paint to the sides of the bucket before the water drains off.

 

3. can you coat the sides of the bucket with something so the paint won't stick but also won't absorb into the paint itself?

 

Keep working on it though, we didn't get the light bulb on the first try!



#10 1972coronet

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 03:32 AM

I see what you're trying for here , Jantrix , and I'm digging the concept !

Tie-Dye with Liquid Gel ! Appropriate scheme for the '66 Chevelle you're working on :o .

 

If I may make a suggestion ; leave the resultant paint on it , but re-dip it by using the less-water process .



#11 Erik Smith

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 03:48 AM

Cool tutorial. I think it looks pretty cool - especially the driver's side. Thanks for taking the pictures and posting.

#12 Jantrix

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 04:24 AM

I see what you're trying for here , Jantrix , and I'm digging the concept !

Tie-Dye with Liquid Gel ! Appropriate scheme for the '66 Chevelle you're working on :o .

 

If I may make a suggestion ; leave the resultant paint on it , but re-dip it by using the less-water process .

 

You know I think I'm going to leave it as is. It's over a base of tan, and I think the purple mess looks kinda cool and certainly unique. After a few days to dry, weather permitting I'll hit it with some gloss clear and see how it looks. This is not a new idea. This method has been around for years, but few people take the time to do it because its not something you see on 1:1 automobiles. Glad you guys like it.



#13 Draggon

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:33 AM

Google "swirladelic". There are some neat pics and links to painting forums. This one is in here in the CBP section.  http://www.modelcars...=52127&&page=31

 

DSC08979-vi.jpg



#14 M0par Jim

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 03:24 PM

To crazyjim, he did waste a good bucket, nothing a small screw and some expy can't fix, the buck can still be used. 

To OP, like your idea and train of thought on this painting trick of yours.



#15 Skip

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:22 PM

That's always a cool effect when it works right.  First time that I saw this was in the old Car Model magazine way back in the late 60's when Hank Borger demonstrated it on I think a Mustang Funny Car.  He had the technique perfected, the body was placed on the bottom of a pan then filled with water, paint sprayed on and swirled then the body was lifted up through the paint film.  I can't remember what he used to lift the body thorugh the paint, fishing line or thread at the wheel wells would work.  Almost like the guys are telling us that they made it work too.

 

The second thing that it looks like is that you may not have enough surface area in the bucket to cover your wagon, that's a pretty big body.  Picture the body in terms of flat like a box laid out including the flaps for the inside of the ends, that's what you are calculating quick and dirty method but it works.  Pretty near to the way that you would figure out how to put a vinyl wrap on the same vehicle including the excess and waste.

 

Say the body is 9" long 5 inches high and 4 inches wide now figure out the surface area it will take to "wrap" the body thinking of the height as another part of the length the two 5" high ends make 10" + 9" for the body gives you 19" long.  Now figure out the width once again the ends are going to be 5" each for 10" + 4" body width = 14" so you will need about a 14" X 19" Container add an inch to the height to make sure that you have enough water cover.  So you are going to need about a 6" deep X 14" wide X 19" Long container.  Easy way to do that would be a cardboard box with a plastic bag liner.  Paint, dip, drain, dry bag, toss bag and hopefully keep body!



#16 Jantrix

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:27 PM

Skip I'm smelling what you're steppin' in. I have another container that is more shallow but is longer and wider, so I think it might work out well. Thanks for the advice guys.



#17 JamesW

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:37 PM

That's pretty cool. I think this same method could work for a muddy look on an off road build too. Just use tans and browns, and put the body in upside down at an angle to give it the illusion that mud was thrown up from the ground.



#18 Jantrix

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:57 PM

Or make a cool camo effect!



#19 azers

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:04 PM

Why couldnt you just clear coat it.

#20 crazyjim

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 04:44 AM

I have the article that Skip mentioned.  I scanned it once and thought I posted it here on the forum.  If you'd like, I can scan again and get it posted.