Jump to content


Round Styrene Width HELP


  • You cannot reply to this topic
12 replies to this topic

#1 Takymoto

Takymoto

    MCM Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Location:Ohio
  • Full Name:Kyle Smith

Posted 21 January 2013 - 03:53 PM

Hi, I'm trying to build a custom rollcage in my 1/24 scale car.   I need to order some round Styrene and I was wondering what diameter would be the best size (to match the scale?)

 

Any help would be appreciated!

 

Thanks

 

-Kyle



#2 Chief Joseph

Chief Joseph

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 530 posts
  • Location:Alabamastan
  • Full Name:Joseph Osborn

Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

If you want represent real-life 1-3/4" tubing, you can use 5/64" tube. I'm pretty sure Plastruct sells that size. It will be just a tad thicker in scale, but that is about the closest you can get in fractional sizes. 2mm would be close if you have access to metric sizes. Hope that helps!

#3 Ace-Garageguy

Ace-Garageguy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,937 posts
  • Location:Down two, then left.
  • Full Name:Bill Engwer

Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:17 PM

This comes up a lot, and it seems there's a basic lack of understanding of what 'scale' is, and how it works...so, for everyone one more time...

 

1/24 scale simply means that whatever model you're working on is "one twenty-fourth actual size", which is another way of saying you simply measure any full sized part, and divide by 24. Another way to think of it is that 24 little 1/24 scale model Jaguar XK-Es placed end-to-end would be exactly as long as one real one. A calculator makes it pretty easy.

So, if you measure ANY 1/24 scale part and multiply the measurement by 24, you will get the size of the real part, and if you measure ANY real part and divide by 24, you will get the correct measurement in 1/24 scale.

Every scale works the same way. In 1/25, divide the full size measurement by 25. In 1/16, divide the full size measurement by 16...and so on and so forth for EVERY SCALE.

 

 

Most roll cage tubing in full scale (real cars) is 1.75 inches to 2.0 inches. Divide 2" by 24. What do you get?



#4 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,379 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 21 January 2013 - 05:27 PM

This comes up a lot, and it seems there's a basic lack of understanding of what 'scale' is, and how it works...so, for everyone one more time...

 

1/24 scale simply means that whatever model you're working on is "one twenty-fourth actual size", which is another way of saying you simply measure any full sized part, and divide by 24. Another way to think of it is that 24 little 1/24 scale model Jaguar XK-Es placed end-to-end would be exactly as long as one real one. A calculator makes it pretty easy.

So, if you measure ANY 1/24 scale part and multiply the measurement by 24, you will get the size of the real part, and if you measure ANY real part and divide by 24, you will get the correct measurement in 1/24 scale.

Every scale works the same way. In 1/25, divide the full size measurement by 25. In 1/16, divide the full size measurement by 16...and so on and so forth for EVERY SCALE.

 

 

Most roll cage tubing in full scale (real cars) is 1.75 inches to 2.0 inches. Divide 2" by 24. What do you get?

 

As painfully obvious as that is, you would be amazed (but then again, maybe not) at how many people have no idea what "1/24 scale" or "1/8" scale or "1/12 scale" means.



#5 Tom Geiger

Tom Geiger

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,373 posts
  • Location:Exton, PA
  • Full Name:Tom Geiger

Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:07 PM

IMG_2647-vi.jpg

 

Or for guys who avoid math at all costs,  get yourself a 1/24 or 1/25 scale ruler.  The one shown above is a 1/25 scale ruler that I use every day when I work on my stuff.  It's absolutely necessary if you do a lot of scratch building. Note that the side I'm showing on it is all inches.  I never deal in feet, inches are easier to deal with.  So it's easy as taking a tape measure to your car and measuring a dimension as 38", then doing the same with the scale ruler.

 

One final tip- I keep a photo copy of that ruler in my wallet. So when I'm out in real life and I see something I think is in scale, I just measure it.  I can't tell you how many times people figures looked 1/25 to me but scaled out to be 7 foot tall kids!


Edited by Tom Geiger, 21 January 2013 - 06:09 PM.


#6 scalenut

scalenut

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 640 posts
  • Location:Tennessee
  • Full Name:Andy Hobbs

Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:04 PM

 scale measurement  1:24  or 1:1......vs ......... fraction 1/24



#7 plowboy

plowboy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,213 posts
  • Location:in the middle
  • Full Name:Roger Hayes

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:47 AM

For 1/24 scale, get .080 styrene rod. That will be close to two inches or 1.92 if you want to be exact.



#8 wisdonm

wisdonm

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 524 posts
  • Location:Brookfield (Milwaukee), Wisconsin
  • Full Name:Don Mueller

Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:01 AM

Ace-Garage Guy and the rest of you are right on, but over-thinking the whole thing. We usually work in 1:25 or 1:24 scale. The mm scale on almost every ruler is 1:25.4 scale. So I just use mm. 1mm = 1 scale inch. Ie, 2mm rod is perfect for 2 inch roll bar tubing, 1.57mm (1/16") rod is 1.5 inch tubing. Close enough for hand grenades and tactical nuclear weapons.



#9 Ace-Garageguy

Ace-Garageguy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,937 posts
  • Location:Down two, then left.
  • Full Name:Bill Engwer

Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:09 AM

I agree, but I keep a $12 digital-readout caliper and a $1 calculator on the bench and have been using them to avoid sausage-like plug wires, fence-post hood-props and sewer-pipe roll-cages for so long that 'measuring and figuring' is now second nature, takes 30 seconds, and gets things right every time.


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 23 January 2013 - 06:19 AM.


#10 wisdonm

wisdonm

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 524 posts
  • Location:Brookfield (Milwaukee), Wisconsin
  • Full Name:Don Mueller

Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:47 AM

I too use a digital-readout caliper. Just push the mm/" button to convert. No calculator needed. KISS


Edited by wisdonm, 23 January 2013 - 06:48 AM.


#11 Tom Geiger

Tom Geiger

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,373 posts
  • Location:Exton, PA
  • Full Name:Tom Geiger

Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:46 AM

I agree, but I keep a $12 digital-readout caliper and a $1 calculator on the bench and have been using them to avoid sausage-like plug wires, fence-post hood-props and sewer-pipe roll-cages for so long that 'measuring and figuring' is now second nature, takes 30 seconds, and gets things right every time.

 

Gotta love it!  I get a chuckle out of guys who use full size doll house accessories in dioramas. Nothing like a 24 ounce Coke can!



#12 Edsel-Dan

Edsel-Dan

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,343 posts
  • Location:Pocomoke, Maryland
  • Full Name:Daniel Lee Gunter

Posted 25 January 2013 - 01:21 AM

I think you mean they use the 1"-1' 1 Inch to 1 foot scale.

Most Doll house accessories are 1 inch scale.

They need to use the 1/2 Inch scale stuff.

 

Or tell them to go with G Scale/gauge Model Rail roding parts.

They are actually 1/22.5, but closer than the 1/12!!



#13 Ace-Garageguy

Ace-Garageguy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,937 posts
  • Location:Down two, then left.
  • Full Name:Bill Engwer

Posted 25 January 2013 - 03:41 AM

I too use a digital-readout caliper. Just push the mm/" button to convert. No calculator needed. KISS

Yup, that button and the calculator have definitely contributed to my lazy-math syndrome. B)