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spray can or air brush


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#1 CrazyGirl

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:13 AM

Hi , just a quick question , whats best , spray cans or air brush , and i see complete air brush units for 150 dollars , any good ?? and what paints are best if using an air brush ,, base coat ,, clear coat  ,,thanks



#2 disabled modeler

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:30 AM

Hi Anne... I just use spray cans myself never used an airbrush...with practice and proper use you can get a nice paint job from spray cans.



#3 crazyjim

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:42 AM

Iwata air brush.



#4 afx

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:45 AM

Anne

 

I prefer to use both.  I like spray cans for the bodies.  Cans give you a nice big spray pattern to help keep from building too much paint in one spot.  Tamiya spay paints are my favorite.

 

I then use a single action Badger airbrush to piant samll parts, interiros etc.  Here spray cans put out too much paint too quickly and make it difficult to get good paint coverage without drowning the part in paint or getting runs in the paint. 

 

Here is an example of the results I get with this method.

 

Hope this helped.

Attached Files



#5 midnightprowler

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:21 AM

I actually do it the opposite of JC.  I usually use a airbrush for bodies, and spray cans for smaller parts.  I use a Badger Crescendo dual action, it's been a very reliable unit.



#6 Gramps2u

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:27 AM

I do both. An Iwata Eclipse & a Bink's Wren. As for rattle cans I warm the can of paint in hot water. It helps thin the viscosity of the paint . Gotta be careful on the water temp heating a can, I have had the concave bottom bulge outwards.  Not an ideal way to redecorate the wifes kitchen!

Then it just depends is the paint offered in both can or bottle some colors vary from time to time. Then what kind of mood I am in.

A Late friend of mine always seemed to win best paint at contests continuously. I asked him what air brush and polishing methods did he use ? He said neither, its simply a rattle can finish, no polishing! Warming the can was his secret.


Edited by Gramps2u, 10 March 2013 - 03:33 AM.


#7 DavidChampagne

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:28 AM

Air brush...hands down. If you can afford it.
If you plan to continue this hobby, I would suggest a good air brush ( $150.00 - $200.00).
I have a 5 gallon air compressor from Sears. I am thinking about $200.00 when I bought it. But, you can go with a much smaller one. I use mine around the house for airing up tires, blowing dust off parts from sanding, etc. I have seen the complete package with a small compressor at Hobby Lobby, etc. (Don't forget to get a 40% discount coupon on line). With the coupon, you may get away with around $150 - $200 total.
I was amazed at much better my bodies look, even the first one.

What king of models do you build.

Good Luck Anne_and post some pictures.

Edited by DavidChampagne, 10 March 2013 - 04:28 AM.


#8 cobraman

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:56 AM

I have a couple of airbrushes but have not used them in a long time. I prefer rattle cans nyself. Maybe I'm a little lazy and got sick of cleaning up after airbrushing ( not really all that hard ).  I did use the airbrush for camo jobs when I was into the military builds.



#9 Custom Mike

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 05:45 AM

I use both, but before jumping into an airbrush, buy a cheap external mix one to get a feel for using one. I bought a Paasche dual action and Badger single action years and years ago before I knew what i was doing (Back in the early '80's), and gave them both away because I hated them, I couldn't make 'em work. I use the most basic airbrush you can buy now (Total cost was around $19!) with a Paasche compressor, and I do just fine. I spray House Of Kolors paints, DuPont Nason 2-part Clear, Dupli-Color automotive paints, Nail Polishes, Testors, Tamiya, and pretty much anything that says paint on it with no problems.Here's a picture of the airbrush I use, and the results you can get with a cheapo airbrush and some practice!

 

TestorsSingleActionExternalMix-vi.jpg

 

Nail Polish fade with DuPont Nason 2-part Clear

CivicC050-vi.jpg

 

House Of Kolors paint with Dupli-Color Clear

Gambler034-vi.jpg


Edited by Custom Mike, 10 March 2013 - 05:46 AM.


#10 Erik Smith

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 05:56 AM

AB gives you a broader range of possibilities. Everyone has different techniques and most work well for them - and you can get a good finish with either can or AB. However, you can't spray airbrush only paints (Alclad, metalizers) if you don't have an AB. Also, you can decant from the can and spray with an AB, so you can get the control you need but with the pre-thinned paint you want.

I use both regularly.

#11 CJ1971

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:28 AM

Air Brush... Hands down. You have more control, over pressure, finesse, paint/thinner mix etc. Having an A/B in this hobby is a MUST. Whether it's a cheap one or expensive one, you get what you pay for.
Cheers Cliff

#12 DPNM

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:27 PM

I, too, use both. I have learned to get very good results with a spray can and the airbrush is the only way to go for colors that are not available in a spray can. I use fingernail polish quite often and have, as yet, not found it in a spray canGrin.gif. My airbrush is an old Wren single action. I have an Iwata SBS (double action) that I will learn to use with auto paint. I have a Paasche VL (double action) that I use for T-shirts so I am familiar with using a double action.

 

Best advice I can offer is practice, practice, practice. Both with the spray can and, if you invest in one, an airbrush. I suggest tcpglobal on eBay as they seem to have the best prices on airbrushes (and compressors/kits) that I have found on the net. A good beginners airbrush would be a Passche "H" or Badger 200, both being single action (similar to using a spray can).

 

Good Luck



#13 Dave Ambrose

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:19 PM

I like my airbrush. It lays down paint more smoothly than most spray cans. Spray cans are very convenient, but don't do nearly as good on laying down ultra smooth paint. That said, Tamiya paints are very good and I do a most of my priming with Tamiya cans now.

 

My primary airbrush is a Paasche VL double action. If you look at online vendors like Dixie Art, you can find airbrushes at a significant discount. The VL comes in a kit with three needles, a color cup, and bottles. That's the kit to get. Iwatas are excellent too. I have an Eclipse BC and it's unrivaled for fine detail work. But not so good when you need to paint a body. That job goes to the VL and a No. 5 needle.

 

I would avoid the usual airbrush compressors, they pulse when you try to lay down a lot of paint. Better to get a small oilless compressor with a tank from Home Depot and fit a filter/regulator and pressure gauge. You can also use a CO2 tank if you need absolute quiet.



#14 935k3

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:43 AM

Spray cans are great for bodies and chassis but once you use an airbrush yowill not regret getting one. Some of the things you can do with one the you cannot without are unlimited colors to spray, ins scale painting of smaller parts, you can contol the sheen and shine of paint, better color density, exhaust system blueing and shading and use of photo etch stencils for tires lettering etc. Ther just plain fun to use. I have 4 of them. Iawata Eclipse BCS(gravity feed), Paasche Talon, Badger 155 Anthem and 175 Crescendo. I would not build without them.

Edited by 935k3, 11 March 2013 - 03:45 AM.


#15 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 09:22 AM

Spray cans are convenient, and if the color you want is available in a can, they can produce excellent results. Obviously with spray-cans you have no control over viscosity, air-pressure and pattern-width as you do with an airbrush, but with practice and care, they're great.

 

This is 5 coats of Testors Flaming Orange "one coat" lacquer, and three coats of Testors lacquer gloss clear, all spray-can. The paint has NOT been sanded and polished yet in this shot, so you see it IS possible to shoot it pretty slick.

 

DSCN5584.jpg



#16 gtx6970

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:03 PM

I've used and do have a simple single stage airbrush, but to be honest 99% of the time the color I want is avail in rattle cans so they are just easier for me, if I had to dig out the airbrush when ever I wanted to spray paint something,, then deal with cleaning said air brush,I would never get the ambition to build anything.

 

I have a 3 tone build planned that I will almost have to dig the air brush out for,, so I may do 2 bodies at once ( both cars will be the same 3 colors and paint scheme)



#17 Custom Mike

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:22 PM

Man, that is some pretty paint Bill, and the model's not half bad either!  :D



#18 Mooneyzs

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:37 PM

I prefer using my air brush or my HVLP mini detail gun. I spray mostly PPG and House of Kolor paints on my builds for the body's. But I do use rattle cans for chassis, interior, and various other pieces.

#19 CadillacPat

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:24 PM

I've used and do have a simple single stage airbrush, but to be honest 99% of the time the color I want is avail in rattle cans so they are just easier for me, if I had to dig out the airbrush when ever I wanted to spray paint something,, then deal with cleaning said air brush,I would never get the ambition to build anything.

 

 

 

It only takes 60 seconds to clean an AirBrush,

Less than the time it takes to shake up a can.

 

CadillacPat



#20 Cool Hand

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:46 PM

I use both, spray cans for applying primer,paint to bodies and other large parts.

 

Although I havent been using an airbrush for very long ive found it is good for paints that arent available in cans,custom mixed colours,Alclad etc and is also good for applying paint to small parts and doing extensive paint jobs like Chris Thobe's.

 

 

 

 

 

It only takes 60 seconds to clean an AirBrush,

Less than the time it takes to shake up a can.

 

CadillacPat

 

:blink: 60 secs ? Too me that seems like a bit of an exaggeration. Even doing a quick back flush takes a few minutes.

 

As I mentioned above, I havent been using an airbrush very long.

But I personally Iike break to down the entire airbrush and give it a full clean after each painting session,which for me usually requires about 5 mins.


Edited by Cool Hand, 11 March 2013 - 09:05 PM.