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Yellow plastic & Bleed through


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#1 Mal.au

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 10:49 PM

Hi guys need some help

What do you guys use to seal the dreaded yellow plastic that can bleed through white paint

T.I.A

#2 MrObsessive

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 01:38 AM

Hi Mal!

Believe it or not I use Future Floor Wax to seal that nasty red/yellow plastic. It sounds radical...........but talk to any of the military builders who have been into it for awhile and some of them swear by the stuff. I learned this trick years ago out of Scale Auto magazine.

In your part of the world, it may be called "Kleer" or "Super Shine". It's not a wax per se........but a aqueous acrylic clear used to put a super shine on floors.

Here's a link which shows some of the crazy things that can be done with Future as done by another modeler.....

http://www.f-15estri..._01/matt_01.htm

Also, here's a couple pics of a Monogram '56 (converted into a '55) Thunderbird I built which was molded in red plastic and is notorious for bleeding.

Posted Image
Posted Image

(Yeah, I know the hardtop is on crooked in the first pic! :lol:)

I built this is '99 and the paint still looks fresh and new as when it was first built and has not cracked over the Future. Those that know me and have seen the model can vouch for the paint job on it! :wink:

Here's how I applied it...........I airbrushed about 5 or 6 thin coats......Very carefully....as the Future is quite thin. I recommend that if you're going to airbush, let the jar sit out for a spell.......maybe a 1/2 hour or so.

It'll thicken up a bit and won't run so much out of your airbrush. Let the body sit overnight.........then go over the body very lightly with 1500 grit sandpaper to get rid of any airbubbles and then paint away.

You can also brush it on........but I recommend a "sponge" brush you get at the hardware store so you don't get brush strokes. If you make a mistake, you can use Ammonia to take it off and start over!

I have heard of guys spraying polyurethane over the stuff with no trouble! :shock:

In the near future I'm going to be building the Revell 2006 Mustang which is molded in that too soft plastic. I'll post the results here on how it turns out when I use the Future to overcoat the plastic first.

I could use some of the other barriers............but I've had trouble in the past in that if you use too much thinner in the barrier, it can also craze the plastic and you're right back to square one! :x

Hope this helps! 8)


#3 MonoPed

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 04:58 AM

Sweet 'Bird Bill!!

Can ya tell us more about the '55 conversion??

#4 MrObsessive

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 06:16 AM

Well Brian, lemme see if I can remember that far back! :lol:

The model started as Monogram's '56 T-Bird............but just about every body panel was modified to some degree, not only for the '55 conversion, but also to make the body more 1:1 scale accurate.

This model was started around mid 1999...........I had always wanted to build a really nice 1/24-1/25 '55 'Bird, but there was no kit available and there still isn't today, save for AMT's old 1/16 scale version out of the '70's.

I lowered the rockers a hair because the body in side profile appeared "thin" to me. I also lowered the rear quarters a bit. Also in the side profile, the rear deck (especially behind the seats) was way too flat.........so I cut part of the rear deck from an AMT '57 T-bird (which is more correct) and grafted it onto the rear of the '56.

The grille area was modified as the grille seemed too tall, and I used PE screen from Replicas and Miniatures to get the egg crate look.

The side fender vents were filled in (they didn't appear until '56) and the portholes were filled in on the hardtop (another '56 feature).

The hardtop's general shape was also modified somewhat as the rear window was too small, and the hardtop didn't look right when looking at the model from a front 3/4 view. In hindsight I like the windshield frame from the current '56 kit better (more accurate shape) but I had to work with what I had at the time. :wink:

The car has full opening panels, (doors, trunk, folding seat, gas door) and has working suspension and steerable wheels. The rear bumper was made using an extra bumper from a junk kit, but the exhaust bullets had to be moved further out as they are not the same distance as in the front bumper.

It, along with the front bumper were sent out to be replated by Chrometech.

To give the model a different look on display, I modified the hardtop from the junk kit to a convertible uptop. The top was covered in masking tape and then painted.

To finish everything off............the model was painted Dupont acrylic enamel Thunderbird Blue which as I mentioned in the above post was sprayed over the Future as a barrier. I did use Krylon Gray Sandable Primer as a base, but spraying the Krylon over the Future gave me no trouble at all.

The interior was painted the same but dulled down and the carpet was done using flocking.

A couple inaccuracies................the dash should be a darker green as well as the tops of the inside door panels, but I was using pics from what was a restored car and that's what it had................besides I think my version looks better! :lol:

Here's a direct link to the 'Bird in my Fotki page......
http://public.fotki....rd_thunderbird/

Thanks for asking!


PSSSSST...............if your like me and a real cheapie when it comes to barrier coats, try the Future! 8)

#5 MonoPed

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 10:15 AM

thanx Bill!
I prefer the clean looks of the '55 over the '56, just don't care for the spare tire, I guess :wink:
Brian

#6 Schumacher330

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 04:00 PM

Hey dude, try painting the body with silver and then paint your color over that. The silver should cut out all the bleeding.

#7 MrObsessive

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 11:08 PM

Hey dude, try painting the body with silver and then paint your color over that. The silver should cut out all the bleeding.


Hmmm...............The only caveat with that I would warn is to NOT use Testors Silver! :shock: Years ago I used that as a "sealer/primer" and the color coats chipped very easily off of it.

I haven't used that technique since.

This may have happened due to the silver being so smooth or the silver having such a high metal content that the paint had nothing to grab on to.

In any case Mal............I would always test your paint (maybe on the back of the chassis or interior tub) and see what happens.

Hope all this info didn't drive you crazy! :lol:


#8 Billy Kingsley

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 08:30 AM

Model Master Lacquer White Primer covers it all...I'm doing 2 88-92 NASCAR Oldsmobiles currently, and that kit was issued ONLY in yellow plastic. I also have a 93-94 Pontiac that was issued only in black, which the MML White Primer covered with ease. Pictures to come soon!

#9 Zoom Zoom

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 09:58 AM

After hearing about it from Steve Milberry, I have tried Zinsser BIN primer/sealer. It's a flat white alcohol-based varnish primer. You can get it at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. It comes in spray cans (very poor nozzle, you need to transfer to airbrush for good results :cry: ) or in quart cans (hard to mix thoroughly but airbrushes and sands beautifully-I used 91% alcohol to cut it). This stuff should be applied over a thin layer of lacquer primer, and under the color. It does a great job of blocking color bleed and ghosting from use of lacquer paints. I recently painted a '70's era Monogram model that was molded in red, it turned my Tamiya white primer pink. The BIN sealed it nicely, it went on and stayed white. The model itself is painted white.