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Panel Lines Tutorial


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#21 bobthehobbyguy

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 01:58 AM

Thanks need to try this out,

#22 edward smith

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 05:33 AM

Great info man, the models posted definitely show that the system works. Why isn't this pinned? :blink:



#23 Buffs Fan

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 05:01 AM

Stupid question but when you put down the primer and paint does it not cover up the wash? :huh:  



#24 Joe Handley

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 05:43 AM

Stupid question but when you put down the primer and paint does it not cover up the wash? :huh:  


You need to put the wash over the primer, then paint over both. The wash should tint the paint to a darker tone of the same color and give the gap some depth like you would see with a 1/1 car that has the jabs painted the same color as the outside of the car.

#25 plowboy

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 09:23 AM

Stupid question but when you put down the primer and paint does it not cover up the wash? :huh:  

 

If they're scribed deep enough, a wash isn't necessary. I never wash panel lines.



#26 cruz

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:20 AM

Guys, all the washing and scribing I do is first accomplished on the BARE plastic, I do not wash the lines after adding primer. I scribe them very deep and after that I do not have to touch them anymore. Not after primer, basecoats or even clear, it's as simple as that. That is exactly the idea behind scribing them deeply. Neither the primer, paint and clear touches the scribed/washed lines and that goes with any paint. No matter how dark the wash is, if you look at the pictures of the completed model you will notice that they don't end up as dark as the lines on the bare plastic. That's the magic of this system. You can use dark purple if you want and you won't even need to worry about that.

 

Now, let's say you want to give them a wash after painting. No problem, again, the lines are so deeply scribed that the actual wash will still look realistic and realistic is what we are going for here.

 

 

 

 

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#27 cruz

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:28 AM

Another example....

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#28 cruz

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:38 AM

This is a model painted with Tamiya White which will more clearly show the washed lines. Notice the different angles, just like a real car, the lines slightly disappear as you move the car around. Now, take some time and go outside and walk around your 1/1 car. Nothing different. That's what I like about this system.....

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#29 plowboy

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:21 AM

Here's another thread on panel lines.  http://www.modelcars...showtopic=69807



#30 meaneyme

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 07:32 AM

Sorry but you can put all the links you want and the pictures in this thread don't lie, no need to look anywhere else. Thanks for the tutorial Cruz.



#31 dougwintz

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Posted 27 September 2014 - 03:52 PM

Hi Marcos. Really like the tutorial. In the past, I used pencil to mark the panel lines as in the example of the Olds

 

Attached File  oldsscripe.jpg   48.45KB   0 downloads

 

Now I'm trying the scribe method with a Dodge Coronet

 

Attached File  coronetscribe.jpg   27.98KB   0 downloads

 

I will be interested to see how it all turns out.



#32 Pierre_tec

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Posted 28 September 2014 - 10:32 AM

just seen a videos where a guys is using a dental explorer( i think thats the corect name) as a panel line scribber, can be a good cheap solution to a panel line scribber?? or just grab the tamiya one an do the correct thing? 

since to me seems to be pretty similars, just that isnt as sharp as the scribber



#33 Snake45

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 02:51 AM

I've been using an almost identical method for over a decade now, and love the results. I don't have a scriber, I just use the backside of a used (it doesn't need to be sharp) Xacto blade for everything. I shoot for going about 1/2 to 2/3 of the way through the plastic. I don't have any special "wash," I just use whatever flat or matte black paint is on hand and wipe the excess off with rubbing alcohol. Non-moving body seams (fender caps, rocker panels, etc.) I don't scribe nearly as deeply, and I don't put any black in those. For white or light yellow etc paint jobs, I'll use a medium gray paint for the "wash" instead of black.

 

Excellent tutorial, excellent topic, excellent thread. I almost want to cry when I see a nice model where this hasn't been done but the guy just ran some black into the kit door lines at the end of the build. That almost looks worse than doing nothing at all.