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Marcus M. Jones

Member Since 14 Dec 2007
Offline Last Active Today, 05:07 PM
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Topics I've Started

Any interest for '66-'67 nova hood with the '67 chevelle scoops built in?

09 August 2014 - 05:00 PM

like the title says would anyone be interested in a '66-'67 nova hood with the '67 chevelle scoop built in?

 

let me know so i can get it finished and off to the caster

 

IMG_2059.jpg

 

 

 

i will eventually be working on a bullet proof rear end in 1/25 and parts to the 1/16 General Lee (pro touring AM Max-G Frame or stock undercarriage, engine bay, interior etc)  sometime later this year or next when i have the time.  if anyone is interested in those please let me know specially on the General if you want pro touring or stock parts


Chrysler orders 93 rare early Vipers to the crusher

06 March 2014 - 09:20 AM

http://autos.yahoo.c...-170043330.html

 

Chrysler orders 93 rare early Vipers to the crusher

The original Dodge Viper revealed in 1992 was a beast of a machine — an attempt by then-Chrysler exec Bob Lutz to revive the spirit of the Shelby Cobra and give Chrysler a world-class sports car. Powered by a massive V-10 with 400 hp, the early Viper's brute force overwhelmed many drivers.

Today, the power that made the Viper a legend appears to be at the heart of an order from Chrysler to dozens of trade schools, demanding the immediate destruction of some 93 early Vipers, including a preproduction model that could likely fetch a couple hundred thousand dollars at auction.

According to The Olympian, the staff of South Puget Sound Community College was told by a Chrysler official that their Viper had to be crushed within two weeks. It's common for automakers to donate cars to automotive shop classes, and in many cases the vehicles in such donations aren't saleable — meaning the company technically still owns the cars. School officials say Chrysler told them two of the 93 early Vipers given to schools had been involved in accidents by joyriding students, creating a major liability for Chrysler.

Of those 93, the Viper at SPSCC stands out. It was the fourth Viper ever built, with a prototype hard top years before Dodge offered a production version. With no emissions controls, and no speed limiter, the V-10 can make 600 hp, and school instructors say it could be worth $250,000 to a museum or private Viper fan.

“It’s like the day Kennedy was shot,” Norm Chapman, automotive technology professor at SPSCC, told The Olympian. “No one will forget where they were when they heard the news.”

There's several precedents for Chrysler's order, the most memorable being General Motors' decision to destroy all of its original EV1 electric vehicles after a safety recall it decided not to repair; the few that remain in universities and museums have been permanently disabled. The Vipers at SPSCC and other schools were useful more for promotion than education, but trashing a piece of automotive history seems like a different kind of educational tool: Punishing everyone for the mistakes of a few.


Video Tutorial: Drilling out Round Rod

23 February 2014 - 10:29 PM

In this video i will show 3 ways of drilling rod.  2 ways of drilling across the rod for attaching another rod and i will show how to find the center to drill down the rod.

 

 

 

Youtube Video Link


Realistic Looking Rust

19 February 2014 - 03:58 PM

in this tutorial we are going to use a brine solution to create texture where  Doc. Cranky method is more about chipping paint away...

if you do not know about Doc Cranky method look him up on youtube to see his videos. used together they compliment each other

 

the 3 main products you will be using are

 

brine water (regular table salt with hot tap water works fine)
flat clear (lacquer is recommended)
pastels

 

Step 1) prepping the service. - this is the easiest part of the whole method. basically you need to make sure there is no grease or wax on the area you will be applying this too.   i do recommend applying this to a flat surface over a gloss but it can be done over gloss if you desire to do so.

 

Step 2) applying your brine solution. -  3 ways of putting brine solution on your model.
dipping (works but not the greatest results.)

paint brush (gets better results than dipping.)

misting (best results)

 

i prefer misting with an airbrush but a spray bottle can work just as good.

(Note of importance - if using an airbrush to apply your brine make sure to wash it good before putting it away)

 

basically with this step all you do is put a light mist coat on let it dry (crystallize) and repeat intill you get the desire texture.

it may or will take several coats to get the texture you're looking for.
 

Step 3) Sealing your texture - you will have to seal your texture in with a dull clear once it is fully dried.

I recommend a good 24 hours drying before sealing this with your dull coat.

 

(Note of importance - if you don't seal in the brine coating it could continue to crystallize.)

 

Step 4) Coloring your texture - art pastels work great.  they're cheap and easy to use.

 

with as many different color variations out there chances are you will probably find the right color if not then you'll have to mix it yourself.  i didn't have the right color in my set so i mixed black, bright red and a darkish brown to get the shade of color shown below. a little burgundy and extra black should give you a rust color closer to what a more humid climate would show.

 

(If your pastels are not already in a powder then you will have to sand them into a powder.)

 

IMG_0735.jpg

 

 

because your salt texture has been sealed in you can be a little aggressive with adding your pastels so don't be afraid to rub it in.

IMG_0742.jpg

 

once you get your pastels on you can either leave it like it is or seal it in with a flat clear coat.  i used a flat lacquer on the model below and it doesn't rub off.

 

IMG_0726.jpg

 

 

IMG_0745.jpg

 

 

IMG_0723.jpg


Video Tutorial: Scratch Building AM Max-G Frame

18 February 2014 - 11:10 AM

i wanna apologize for this...  this is my 1st video tutorial and its not as great as i would like it to be.  building this frame was easy but when i started talking about it i quickly realized just how much goes into the build with the many differences between frames and the proper construction of the frame with its pit falls. i got tongue tied and spit out the wrong terms a few times in this video so i must apologize for that. when i get more time i will work on making a better one.

 

 

 

Youtube Video Link