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Don Wheeler

Member Since 29 Sep 2009
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 06:22 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Buying my first airbrush Questions.

26 March 2015 - 06:40 AM

 

Anthem has a needle/nozzle .75mm; the 150 might have a 1.5mm, which is what I have in my Crescendo. The larger the n/n, the easier it is to clean up and to spray thicker paints.

The 150 nozzles are .25, .5, and .76mm.  The Anthem comes with .76mm but .5 and .35mm are available.  The Crescendo can use .5, .76, or 1.0mm nozzles.

 

Don


In Topic: Buying my first airbrush Questions.

25 March 2015 - 08:32 AM

 

Just that it stopped functioning the way it had been - Badger never tells you what the problem was; so, I can't be more specific. I never used Ammonia to clean any of my brushes. I use Lacquer Thinner and Simple Green. BTW, the Revolution is the same size as the Patriot (.5mm). I will have to check the inside of my Patriot and let you know...

It's too bad they don't give more feedback.  There are several things that could cause your symptom.  I think both the Patriot and the Revolution are good airbrushes.  The Revolution does have finer fit and finish, but the Patriot is easier to care for.

 

Don


In Topic: Buying my first airbrush Questions.

25 March 2015 - 07:00 AM

 

I agree! I recently got fed up with my Badger Patriot, which had broken down too often and too soon after repairs. Invested in an Iwata Revolution and have had no problems with it - for longer than my Patriot! Also, because it is a bit more expensive, you'll notice the difference inside the bowl - if you see chrome, you have a better airbrush that is easier to clean because paint has more problems adhering to the smooth, shiny finish, than it does brass.

 

Also, in addition to the type mentioned by Bill (dual/gravity) I would also recommend dual/siphon feed - it is great when you need to spray more than a cup of paint at one sitting, and that happens to me when I want to do a body. With a gravity cup, when you run out of paint, you're adding paint to drying paint inside the cup, and that could lead to adding trash to your finish. The alternative is to clean after every cup is sprayed.

 

Could you elaborate more on what you mean by broken down?  The Patriot is a pretty tough airbrush, much more than the Revolution with its tiny screw in nozzle.  Also, the inside of my Patriot bowl is shiny chrome.  Did you use ammonia to clean yours?

 

I agree on siphon feed for painting model cars.

 

Don


In Topic: Buying my first airbrush Questions.

11 March 2015 - 03:56 PM

The Paasche V is a nice airbrush if you like a side cup like your Aztek.  It won't accept your old Aztek cups though.  As Monty wrote, the 155 is my favorite.  But, there are a lot of good airbrushes out there.  I'd go with something a little sturdier than the Harbor Freight, although it does spray OK.  The Paasche VL and Badger 175 are built like tanks.  And, with choice of nozzles will give a wide range of spray patterns.

 

I have to disagree with Bill about the cleaning kit.  I think it's meant for bigger spray guns.  Fine interdental brushes and some paper towels work well for me.

 

Don


In Topic: Buying my first airbrush Questions.

21 February 2015 - 08:45 AM

If by center tube, you mean the needle bearing, do not try to remove it.  It is pressed in and factory replaceable on the Patriot.  And, don't force anything through it. 

 

You don't really need to completely dismantle an airbrush to keep it clean.  Just clean the parts that the paint touches.  I don't like the commercial cleaning brushes.  The bristles are too stiff.  Fine interdental brushes from the drug store work better.  You might want to have a look at this page.

 

The Patriot is about the easiest internal mix airbrush to clean that there is.

 

Don