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Don Wheeler

Member Since 29 Sep 2009
Offline Last Active Today, 07:23 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Compressor and airbrush driving me nuts!

10 November 2014 - 06:16 PM

The right pressure is the one that works the best for you with your airbrush and paint.  Some airbrushes need more than others.  Bottom fed airbrushes generally need a little more than the gravity fed type.  External mix airbrushes usually need more than internal mix.  Thicker paint needs more to spray well.  Detail work is usually easier with lower pressure than needed for general coverage.  It doesn't matter what the gauge says if you adjust pressure to get the output you want.  It could range from 8 to 40psi.  Once you determine the sweet spot for you, the gauge makes a handy reference, whether you set it with trigger up or trigger down.  For my Badger 155 with a 1/4oz. cup and paint thinned the way I like it, somewhere around 15psi works for me.

 

Don


In Topic: Compressor and airbrush driving me nuts!

10 November 2014 - 06:38 AM

There is only one o-ring in the VL, and that's in the air valve.  If it's the old style, it's part number A52.  The new style air valve gets part number A53.   Have a look at this diagram.  There is a packing nut, but that's not likely to be your problem.

 

If you can spray OK with the #1 nozzle, but not the larger sizes, I think your compressor is tired. The seals do wear out.

 

A little air leak at airbrush joints is normal.  It can usually be stopped with a little bees wax or Chapstick on the threads.

 

Don


In Topic: Compressor and airbrush driving me nuts!

09 November 2014 - 12:48 PM

My guess is the dirty needles are a large part of your problem.  Wet sanding is a last resort.  Try cleaning them with lacquer thinner or acetone.  Judging by the needles, the nozzles are also probably filthy.  Soak them in acetone or lacquer thinner and swab with cotton on a whittled down toothpick.  Hold them up to a  light and look in the large end.  You should see nothing but shiny metal.  Match the nozzle to the head by comparing the size of the openings.  Number 1 is the smallest and 5 the largest.  Check the needles for burrs on the end and the nozzles for tiny cracks.

 

Don't let solvent get in the air valve.  If you are getting air all the time, the air valve may be stuck open or the tiny o-ring inside damaged.  If you take it apart, be careful not to lose the tiny components.

 

Don


In Topic: Compressor and airbrush driving me nuts!

09 November 2014 - 06:49 AM

Unless you have a humungous air leak, the pressure should only drop a few pounds.  That doesn't look like a real regulator to me.  Can you adjust the pressure before you spray?

 

15 psi should work for the VL with a fine or medium nozzle if the paint is thin enough.  Try spraying plain water.  If that works OK, you probably have a paint problem.

 

Don


In Topic: Airbrushes

25 October 2014 - 05:05 AM

I don't know about the older Badgers, but the current models are just as solvent resistant as the Iwatas.  The only seal that isn't is in the air valve.  I clean my Badgers with lacquer thinner all the time.  There's no question Iwatas are fine airbrushes.  I just prefer the 155 for painting models, and it runs a little over $60.

 

Don