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Exhaust painting tips


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#21 Romell R

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 05:25 AM

I made these from Brass and I first paint them using Alclad polished aluminum , then for the bluing I used Tamiya clear blue, and Alclad burnt iron feathered onto the edges of the clear blue.
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#22 Draggon

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 08:00 AM

This is metalizer stainless steel, shaded with Tamiya Dark Bronze. I really like the metalizer paints for exhaust and engine details.

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#23 Steve Keck

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 08:34 AM

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Various Alclads and Metalizers accented by dry brushing.

#24 DirtModeler

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 11:56 AM

I did Metalizer Burnt Exaust over aluminum.. though i don't remember if it was Alclad or Metallizer Aluminum.

I just used something sharp to 'scratch' the weld joints, for an acceptable look without too much difficulty.

My pipes are a 'bit different then most make them though. I use soldered brass rod rather then plastic or lead solder as the basis. I anneal the brass with a propane torch beforehand to make it easier to bend.

I don't do the cool blue petina on the pipes.. because dirt car headers are usually caked with mud and dust, and look old and rusty, rather then the nice bluish pipes on the pavement cars.

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Edited by DirtModeler, 04 September 2011 - 12:02 PM.


#25 crazyjim

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 11:58 AM

Nice looking headers.

#26 Art Anderson

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 01:22 PM

YOU GUYS ROCK!!!! I believe I'll be trying the solder wire trick.. just need to go get some now.. I was looking at some tubing today at hobby lobby, but I wan't sure what size I needed for 3" pipes. When its broke down into hundredths I cant convert that to inches in my head. 1/8= 1.25, right??? :huh: :blink: What about the colors of the pipes you see on the NASCARS pipes?? Is that Jet Exhaust???


Solder does come in 1/8", which decimals out to .125". Now 1/25th scale is .040" to the inch, so .125" scales out to 3 1/8 inches. If you can find it, pure tin solder, in 1/8", bends as readily as the common lead/tin stuff, but being stiffer, holds its shape a lot better!

Art

#27 mr cheap

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 07:28 PM

dont for get to drill out the end of the tail pipe

#28 booboo60

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 11:35 PM

here is a set that I make out of Solder,heat shrink and a Straw End!! I also put a strip of plastic  with holes drilled for the pipes to fit in, this makes it easier to secure too side of block,

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#29 mikevillena

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 11:54 PM

Various shades of Metalizer paints airbrushed on and a wash of artists' acrylic burnt sienna, ultramarine blue and Tamiya acrylic clear orange to replicate the heat discoloration around the welds.

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This is in a slightly larger scale (1/10th) but you can still use the same technique.