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Cool Diecast trucks


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#1 monsterman

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 07:38 PM

These guys went all OUT on these.. And I am betting that us plastic guys could use parts, frames etc but I dont know if I'd wanna take one apart!!
http://www.pro-liner...real/index.html

#2 Jairus

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 04:29 AM

That Suburban has a lot of possible applications if it wern't for the diecast crappy metal body....
Why can't the industry make thinner bodies? The heavy metal shell is just too heavy for the plastic structure underneath so they beef it up to the point that it looks like a toy!
Sorry for the rant.

I like the Suburban....
:roll:

#3 Zoom Zoom

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 05:30 AM

That Suburban has a lot of possible applications if it wern't for the diecast crappy metal body....
Why can't the industry make thinner bodies? The heavy metal shell is just too heavy for the plastic structure underneath so they beef it up to the point that it looks like a toy!
Sorry for the rant.

I like the Suburban....
:roll:


The main reason for the thick sides is the simple fact that a diecast vs. plastic body has to be thicker, not for strength but simply because the inner "male" core of the mold has to have a clear path to pop the body off; plastic kits have an inner core that allows a bit of an undercut, and once the part has been cooled the ejector pins literally pop the plastic part off of the core, even w/the undercut (usually from the midpoint of a door through the rocker panels). The plastic is flexible and they can do that; the metal is solid. The plastic bodies have to have a uniform wall thickness, where metal doesn't. That's why the body sides in diecast are thick, and often the profile of the body is flatter than prototypical because there can be no undercut at all w/diecast.

If you look at a lot of Revell's more modern diecast models, they're pretty thin and have the same wall thickness as plastic kits, until you get to the bodysides. Until/unless they use an inner core that could possibly retract (doubtful), diecast bodies will be a compromise over plastic. Certain slab-sided subjects lend themselves a lot better to diecast than the more organic shapes of many cars, especially cars of the '60's and later.

#4 Casey429

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 08:00 AM

Those wheel and tire sets look like they have potential to use for an offroad or 4X4 build. I'll have to remeber this...