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JO-HAN Molds?


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#41 paul alflen

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 08:15 AM

COULD IT BE A TEST SHOT BODY?

#42 Eshaver

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 09:37 AM

Ya know, there was a guy there I coulldda bought a Dodge body off of that was original .I'm in touch with him . He may still have it too. Ed Shaver

#43 Casey

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 09:49 AM


COULD IT BE A TEST SHOT BODY?


Or it could be they just used whatever plastic was left, mixed and melted some white and clear, and injected the mold with it?

#44 Hypermung

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 10:35 AM

is the body real flimsy/weak? Maybe you could re enforce it with resin or epoxy.

The only imperfection I can see is the top 1/4 of the RH quarter window post is a little short shot, but other than that it's fine.. Same thickness as the X/EL, ridgid & durable looking.... Just this weird transparent plastic had me stumped?

#45 von Zipper

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 10:45 AM

In the early to mid 70s I used to go to a hobby shop in the Detroit area called "West Point Hobby" and every so offten an old man would come in with a big cardboard box full of loose Johan parts. There were bodys, interior tubs, bumper & grills ect. there was never enough to make a whole kit. The guy that owned the shop said they were seconds and flawed parts and would sell that stuff by the piece. I bought a '62 Dodge Dart body that was swirlled in red and blue plastic for a dollar.
Looking back on it now- That might have been John Hanley himself that brought those boxs there ?
Since then I have stripped the chrome from a few vintage Johan kits to find the same swirled colored plastic underneath.

#46 Eshaver

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 12:01 PM

Zipper, I'm told, I don't know for certain ole John had to sleep in the office to keep people from pilfering the place in their off hours . I'm also told pay checks bounced too. The swirled plastic would seem to fit the picture I have of the place . Ed Shaver

#47 Junkman

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 01:58 PM

The use of swirled or half transparent plastic for plated parts is not restricted to Jo-Han and not uncommon. Now please, please take my word for it and don't make me rummage through the entire dungeon until I find my soaked plated parts box to make pics to prove it.

Edited by Junkman, 09 November 2011 - 01:58 PM.


#48 Junkman

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 02:05 PM

Actually, Heller used clear plastic for plated parts, at least in the first edition of the 1:24 Citroen 15/6 kit.

#49 Eshaver

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 02:32 PM

Christian, Revell did the same back in the early 1960's and I think maybe Aurora did too............Ed Shaver

#50 Modelmartin

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 03:11 PM

Clear plastic is cheaper. That is why they use it for chrome trees.

#51 Casey

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 06:45 PM

Hans, I hope you don't mind me sharing this pic you took, but this is too good not to share.

"Hey what's that over there?"

"Oh, just the wood master pattern pieces for the '70 Plymouth Superbird body" :o

Posted Image

#52 jbwelda

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 07:43 PM

thanks for dragging this topic up, those are some epic photos of the johan building. i didnt think they even would have had a building in 92 but there you have it!

someone mentioned whoever purloined the molds should be proud of themselves (sarcastically of course) but my understanding is that those molds were for some obsolete equipment and no one could use them anyhow, or maybe johan could but their equipment was getting old and was itself totally obsolete. so maybe it was just meant to be, plus those molds had to be getting pretty loose from use anyhow.

#53 gtx6970

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 01:39 AM

What ? hard to find and expensive ??

Heck, , I got these for 45 bucks for the lot last weekend and the Olds and Fury are still sealed. ,, You guys must be mistaken. ;)

Posted Image


I'll give you ALL your money back for just the 1962 Dodge and 1962 Plymouth, you can keep the rest for free

#54 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 03:22 AM

Fascinating photos.

Kind of puts to rest the often-repeated notion that injection-molding dies or tools have to weigh thousands of pounds and be moved by forklift, eh?

#55 Art Anderson

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:21 AM

Fascinating photos.

Kind of puts to rest the often-repeated notion that injection-molding dies or tools have to weigh thousands of pounds and be moved by forklift, eh?


What you see are tooling "inserts", which had to be placed into a much larger mold base (or frame, if you will). AMT, MPC, and I suspect even Monogram and Revell used essentially the same sort of system.

Art

#56 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:40 AM

What you see are tooling "inserts", which had to be placed into a much larger mold base (or frame, if you will). AMT, MPC, and I suspect even Monogram and Revell used essentially the same sort of system.

Art


I'm aware of that, and I'm sure everyone appreciates that clarification. I think it's good for modelers to understand the hardware and processes involved in making this stuff.

My point, which I should have made clearer, is that dies as shown could have easily been spirited away by just about anyone. I've read several statements that tooling couldn't have been smuggled out because it was simply too large. Obviously not so.

And obviously tooling inserts would be useless unless suitable injection-molding equipment, (including bases, frames, etc) was available that would function with the particular insert design.

#57 johnbuzzed

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:51 AM

I was stationed at Selfridge ANGB in Mount Clemens in '74 and '75, just a few minutes away from MPC, AMT and JoHan. Of course, I never went to any of them... who woulda thunk...? :(

Edited by johnbuzzed, 24 October 2012 - 05:52 AM.


#58 GMP440

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 06:06 AM

Very interesting photos. Had no idea that the molds were small. Were there more than one mold for each car in order to have a good pace on production? They must not have done huge amounts of production like Revell, AMT , etc. Were Johan kits produced in small amounts compared to the other kit companies?
Judging from the pics of the tables with the molds, looks like it was a messy and cluttered place to work at.

#59 thatz4u

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 09:39 AM

The truth is, that like the 1948 Tucker, the missing molds were bought by shill bidders from AMT & Revell.
Then they were hidden at a ranch in Roswell, NM & later went to a storage hanger at Area 51 where they remain till this very day.....

#60 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 09:43 AM

The truth is, that like the 1948 Tucker, the missing molds were bought by shill bidders from AMT & Revell.
Then they were hidden at a ranch in Roswell, NM & later went to a storage hanger at Area 51 where they remain till this very day.....


Man, really ??? That would explain the rumor I've been hearing about the FTL Tucker starship project. Wow.