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convert italeri opel blitz to LRDG chevrolet?


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#1 62rebel

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 07:49 AM

slightly out of context, maybe, but has anyone contemplated using the blitz chassis to convert the revell '41 chev pickup to a LRDG truck? the LRDG trucks were 2 wheel drive, cut down one ton trucks with modified aircraft wheels and tires for loose sand driving. i've built a tamiya 1/35 but i'd prefer a 1/24-1/25 version to go with the rest of my stuff. i also started but never finished an RAF/RCAF 1941 ford woody conversion. it is languishing in a box, deep in the closet.

#2 crashalot2

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 10:43 AM

If you can find the right tires it would be a nice truck . One thing the blitz is a 2 ton truck so it may be to large. You could beef up the 41 frame and axles to be more like a 1 ton. Good luck

#3 Aaronw

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 12:21 PM

You could, Opel and Chevrolet basically have the same chassis, but there are also a number of sources for resin frame and chassis parts (springs etc) which miht end up being cheaper since the Italeri Opel kits are getting kind of hard to find. Spalding Trading and Shipping and American Industrial Truck Models would be good places to find quality resin parts you might find helpful in the conversion.

The LRDG used the Canadian built Chevrolet 15cwt 1311X3 (3/4 ton) trucks and Ford 01 V8 (1940 Ford 1/2 ton truck) as pilot cars (scout vehicles) until replaced by the Jeep. The Chevrolet was 2wd the Ford was a 4x4.

The Canadian built Chevrolet 30 cwt 1533X2 (1.5 ton) truck was the primary patrol vehicle (the 30cwt is the one the Tamiya kit represents).

You could modify the Revell kit to make a 1311X3 pilot truck pretty easily, or with more work (kit bashing, resin parts or scratchbuilding) could make it into a 1533X2 Patrol truck.

You could also use one of the variations of the Monogram 1940 Ford pickup to build a Ford 01 pilot truck too if you wanted some variety.

The AMT, Hasegawa and Italeri make 1/25 jeeps which might be helpful for 1/25 guns.

You might have some luck on the wheels from a desert racing aftermarket company. I don't think the Blitz wheels would be right, too narrow and the LRDG didn't mount dual wheels on the pilot cars or patrol trucks but I don't know of any sites to recommend.

There are several good websites on the LRDG that might be helpful.

http://www.lrdg.de/main.htm

http://www.lrdg.org/

http://blindkat.hege.../lrdg/lrdg.html

http://ourworld.comp...man/sasjeep.htm


Osprey has a good book on the LRDG as well in their New vanguard series.

Neat project, I hope to see some pics when you get started. I'm currently working on a 1/35 Panzer Models Resin Ford 01 V8 LRDG pilot car and have the Tamiya kit waiting to go.

#4 62rebel

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 04:51 AM

i'm always crossing over between military and automotive models and have been a history buff for decades (it must be a modelers' disease) so it was great when i found the LRDG site with great pics and explanations. i'm a sucker for the under-weaponed, under-armored, underdog who can nip at the better armed enemies' heels and run away. (or stand and make a fight of it, for that matter, as they sometimes had to) sort of like a certain Virginia gentleman named Mosby from the 1860's.... reading about the LRDG exploits and techniques was enlightening. putting read knowledge to use in building accurate models is what it is all about!

#5 62rebel

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 04:32 AM

does the RAF ford woodie wagon qualify as a truck? i dug up my '41 woodie RAF conversion and started working on it again last night. well; i finished putting the tires on. for lack of anything better, i used formula desert dogs from AMT with the lettering shaved off anf the sidewalls sanded smooth, on the wide plain rims from the AMT 49 ford kit. the wheel wells are enlarged front and rear for clearance, and the rest of the undercarriage as offered in the kit.

#6 Biscuitbuilder

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 05:58 AM

does the RAF ford woodie wagon qualify as a truck? i dug up my '41 woodie RAF conversion and started working on it again last night. well; i finished putting the tires on. for lack of anything better, i used formula desert dogs from AMT with the lettering shaved off anf the sidewalls sanded smooth, on the wide plain rims from the AMT 49 ford kit. the wheel wells are enlarged front and rear for clearance, and the rest of the undercarriage as offered in the kit.


No reason why not! I have an excellent book on Ford Woodie station wagons, and their history, with a lot of pics of '40 and '41 Ford station wagons prepared for service with the Canadian Army in North Africa.

My notion for one of these is doing a Marmon-Herrington 4wd conversion for it--MH simply used a standard Ford rear axle & torque tube, modified to put the differential off the the right side of the engine oil pan, parallel front leaf springs to support it, and a transfer case built to take it's drive from the PTO on the side of a Ford truck transmission of the era. The only thing that has held me up is those huge balloon tires--but I will solve that problem one of these days.

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#7 62rebel

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 04:28 AM

TIP:to get odd sized (re:big balloon) tires, chuck an AMT skinny slick onto your dremel and sand it until it 's good and round. carve tread lines onto it, and copy it in resin.