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Big Bad Benz...finally finished!


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#41 vizio93

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 03:22 AM

Oh, I'm just getting started! ;)

Lots more engine work done today... I'll post photos tomorrow.


Sweet can't wait to see 'em !!! :D

#42 Dragline

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 07:42 AM

Wonderful work Harry!


I need to get one of these I think.


I'm watching this one.


Bob

#43 Harry P.

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 08:32 AM

I need to get one of these I think.


Start saving up your pennies... you're going to need a lot of them! But it's worth it...

#44 Harry P.

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 05:37 PM

After I clean up each part–remove mold seams, sink marks, etc.–I attach the part to a piece of scrap sprue with a tiny dot of crazy glue. The sprue makes a great "handle" to use when painting the part. After the paint dries, I just snap the part off. This is 1/2 of the rear end...

Posted Image

#45 vizio93

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 02:45 PM

It's looking better and better every day :rolleyes:

#46 Harry P.

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 03:38 PM

While the painted pieces of the rear axle were drying, I started work on the chassis. The main chassis is made of stamped steel, and it's pretty solid (and heavy!)... the side rails are plastic, and bolt on to the chassis. Here you can see the progress on the front end, which has fully functioning suspension. All the suspension parts (upper and lower A arms, spindles, etc.) are also made of metal.

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Mercedes has always been known for technical and engineering innovation and excellence. This car is no exception. At a time when many cars still had solid front axles and leaf springs–pretty much unchanged from what a stagecoach had–this car had independent coil spring suspension at all four corners. You can see that the front end is basically the same as what most cars run today, that is, upper and lower A arms with coil springs.

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Here's a shot of the tie rods/steering linkage, looking at the bottom of the chassis:

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#47 FujimiLover

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 06:35 PM

Hey there. Nice work is that suspension functional? The engine look's like one of those that could almost start up and run! I guess we won't be seeing this in ROM will we? LOL!

Nice job though, sweet details......................

#48 Harry P.

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 06:47 AM

Hey there. Nice work is that suspension functional?


Yes.

#49 Harry P.

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 06:49 AM

The universal joints are a little different than what we're used to seeing on a modern car... the ability to flex in any direction is via a thick center rubber disc.

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#50 Jairus

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 08:02 AM

Looks like a darned fun project there Harry! :blink:

And you are doing a fine job of building it.
Merry Christmas!
J

#51 Mr.1/16th

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 10:41 AM

B E A U TIFUL!!!!!! :lol: HAVE FUN BUILDING IT!!! KEEP US ALL POSTED :lol:

#52 Harry P.

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 06:13 PM

Engine is now mounted on the chassis. The valve cover has not been painted yet!

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Brakes. Yep... brakes! That's Pocher detail... B)

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#53 Fuel Coupe

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Posted 27 December 2009 - 11:30 AM

Very Nice work Harry. Ive been wanting to build a Pocher for a really long time. This just makes me want one even more....

#54 Harry P.

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Posted 27 December 2009 - 01:09 PM

Very Nice work Harry. Ive been wanting to build a Pocher for a really long time. This just makes me want one even more....


If you're up for a little frustration along the way, they're a lot of fun. Almost like building a real car! :lol:

#55 vizio93

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Posted 27 December 2009 - 05:14 PM

If you're up for a little frustration along the way, they're a lot of fun. Almost like building a real car! :D


Yeah and almost the same price B) :D

#56 vizio93

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 05:07 AM

Hows it coming along with that Benz Harry ?

#57 kyledr330

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 06:31 AM

WOW, I'm sorry I didn't see this thread sooner! That is the most detail I have ever seen in a kit before. Outstanding work!

#58 Harry P.

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 08:47 AM

Lots of progress. Let's start with the chassis, which is pretty much done. Here it is as of today... you can see that I've installed the floor (it comes already "carpeted"):

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The grille is an aftermarket PE piece which replaces the black plastic molded grille from the kit (don't even ask what that piece cost!!!). Having that mesh actually be "mesh" with open holes makes a huge difference in the look. BTW... I did't have a big enough surface to shoot this thing on, so I shot it on the floor! :)

Now that the chassis is built, I'm skipping around to various subassemblies, not following the instruction's sequence.

I'm going to do a custom interior for several reasons:

1. The kit's seats are very nice... they have foam padding, real springs, "leather" upholstery (actually vinyl that looks like leather)... but they are very inaccurate. In fact they don't look even vaguely like the seats in the real car!

2. The kit supplied "leather" upholstery isn't my cup of tea, color-wise. It's also too thick and would be a pain to try and stretch around curves and edges.

3. I want to do things my way! :lol:

First step for the custom door panels: cut off the molded- in armrest and door cubbyhole surround:

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Next, fill in the cubbyhole with scrap sheet styrene and trim about 1/32" off all around the perimeter of the panel to accomodate the thickness of the upholstery and wood trim coming:

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Finally, do it my way!

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I used a French curve to lay out the arcs on the door panel and to cut out the pieces. What you see here is 1/64" birch veneer, stained and covered in several layers of clear acrylic. I used CA to glue the large center "swoosh" in place first. Next, the "chrome" trim strips (two different gauges of aluminum beading wire from Michael's) were attached with CA. Then I cut the "leather" pieces (actually vinyl fabric that looks like leather, but much thinner and more flexible than leather would be) and attached them to the panel with contact cement. With contact cement you get literally ONE CHANCE to position things correctly, because once it's down, it's down for good. I got lucky and matched up to the curved trim strips pretty well. The "leather" was cut oversized and wrapped around the door panel edges, than the excess flaps attached to the back side with CA. Finally the top piece of wood trim was made from pieces of the same birch veneer, stained and assembled to look like one big slab of wood trim. The door handle, window crank and armrest/storage bin haven't been installed yet.

#59 Harry P.

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 08:54 AM

Like I said, the kit seats, while impressive as far as detail, don't look correct, so I used aftermarket resin seats. I lose the kit seat's detail features, like foam padded cushions and real springs under the seat and backrest... but what I get instead are seats that actually look like real 500K seats. Here is one of the seats as it comes in resin:

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And here's what it looks like after I upholstered it with the same "leather" that I used on the door panels:

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Pretty cool, huh?

#60 Harry P.

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 09:05 AM

Like most Pocher kits, the wire wheels are built up spoke by spoke, and each spoke has its own individual nipple. Needless to say, building a Pocher wire wheel is tedious and time-consuming. The "round" parts of the wheels are stamped steel. How many kits can you think of that come with steel parts trees? :lol:

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Now, I won't bore you with all the gory details "behind the scenes" as far as building the wheels. Let's just say that none of the parts fit correctly, the spokes are too long, etc. Here's an example of one problem: On a real wire wheel, alternate spoke holes around the rim are offset a bit so that the spokes can cross each other without interference. On the Pocher wheels, all the spoke holes are on the same plane, and the spokes are straight... the result being that the spokes can't cross each other and wind up with their other end in the correct position on the hub. What this means in plain English is that every single spoke has to bent a little bit, so that they can cross each other correctly. Talk about tedious! I actually spent more time correcting the parts so that I could build the wheels than I spent actually building the wheels! Here's one of the finished wheels:

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The seven little cylinders around the rim represent the balancing weights. On the real car the wheels came with these balancing weights already installed. Each one was in reality a stack of smaller weights. The wheel was balanced by adding or subtracting individual weights from whichever weight stack necessary. Kind of clever in a Germanic engineering overkill sort of way...:)

The kit tires are very stiff and won't flex enough to get them to stretch over the finished wheel... so what I did was put the tire in a bowl of water and microwaved it for a minute or two. That made the tire nice and soft, soft enough to stretch over the wheel. Of course, you have to be careful not to heat the tire too much... :D

Eventually I'm going to paint whitewalls on the tires.