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How To Make Opening & Functional Doors, Hoods, and Trunks


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#41 Mike Kucaba

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Posted 25 August 2010 - 09:28 AM

Why not look at an unbuilt model that has opening doors etc already and that may make things more clear?

#42 Darren B

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Posted 25 August 2010 - 09:48 AM

Why not look at an unbuilt model that has opening doors etc already and that may make things more clear?

You know what that is an excellent idea, never gave it a thought. That would work the only thing is I don't have one in the collection at the moment. What kits being produced currently have opening doors, it doesn't matter what year or make of car because if i can find one that would help seeing how they engineered it to butt up to the floorboard, thats my biggest issue right now.

Edited by Darren B, 25 August 2010 - 09:48 AM.


#43 torinobradley

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 05:11 AM

Another suggestion is to look at the real car your trying to replicate. That way you can see how the jambs and interior interact with each other. You can also see where the trim goes, where the striker, hinges, and other details. Everything else should only be a matter of cutting and layering plastic.

#44 Jason Vandergriff

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 09:39 AM

Heres some shots i took of my revell 57 chevy with all opening doors. Not a bad kit with some time but mines not done yet either.

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#45 bobbyj

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 04:45 PM

the problem with looking at a kit with opening doors is the dont open properly. the front of the door opens outside the fiender. a lot of the cars early 60s late 50s open into the front fender. the way to do the part of the jamb where it meets the floor is to put the interior into the body and measure it out. cut some styrene to fit just to the floor but not quite over where the door panel sits. I to have a post up in on the bench it was just put up mr. norms dart i have plenty of jamb pics and if you have any questions or want to see more pics just let me know.
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#46 Foxer

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 04:18 AM

So far, I haven't seen what people do for the 3rd and 4th hands needed to use this method. I guess you could hold the body in a vice, but you'd need to be pretty careful to not gauge or crack the body when it has a lot of curvature.

#47 plowboy

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 07:24 AM

I don't know why anyone would use the thread method when using the backside of an xacto blade is so much easier and provides a much smoother cut. ;) A razor saw works better than an xacto knife. It cuts faster and smoother than the xacto knife. I still have to use the xacto on round corners.

#48 runs_12.2

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 11:25 AM

i have never heard of that but it sounds good but how are you supposed to do it on cars that have a top? maybe start it with a knife and than use thread. idk

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#49 ewaskew

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 12:40 PM

Yea I tried this for about 10 seconds years ago and stuck with the knife method.
I do use a dremell tool on the inside of the body with a big cone shaped grinding stone.
[1] I hold the body up to the light and mark it inside where the door lines are.
[2] I follow the lines creating a grove,it is a little rough looking and takes practice
however if you don't get to deep,after you cut the lines from the outside
of the body you can sand the edges smooth,giving them a thinner real looking edge.



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#50 hoopty388

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:06 PM

I learned this trick years ago. used it ever since. the trick is move back and forth fast enough to melt the plastic but not so fast that it makes the plastic "gooey".found it works best on trunk lids and sunroofs. Is an advantage over "backkniving" on things like sunroofs or half - doors, where you don't have a groove to start with. sure many will disagree, but just my $.02. I believe there is a time and place for everything. If you say "I'll NEVER use that!" you only limit your abilities.

#51 charlie8575

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 06:12 PM

I've never tried opening a door, but I'd wonder if something like a panel scriber might be a better alternative?

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#52 W-409

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 09:15 PM

I've used Trumpeter's panel scriber (what ever is the name...) and it works fine. Don't push too hard, many times just pull it without hard pushing, otherwise scriber comes out of the panel line and then you need putty... That's very easy. But hinges aren't really easy to build. I have used MIG wire and some pipe, where the MIG wire goes. Don't glue MIG wire, or any other wire to that pipe, otherwise the door isn't opening. I think, the best tip for hinging them is a good picture.

This may help?
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#53 tylersloan

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 01:52 PM

im building the revell 32 five window special edition and since the trunk was not molded in i want to cut open the doors .
i have an exact o knife but i dont want to slip and mess up the body so can any one help and maybe post up some pick's with a how to

#54 John Pol

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 03:04 PM

The best to do this is use the backside of your blade number 11 blade. And go slow until you go threw I hope this helps you.
Anf than just make your own hinges.

John Pol

#55 JustBill

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 03:32 PM

You can also use sewing thread. Its very time consuming and you'll go through a lot of thread doing it this way, but its a very clean cut. Also it doesn't remove as much plastic as the knife will so that means a tighter fit when the door is closed.

#56 Fender

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Posted 09 March 2011 - 06:28 PM

Sewing thread? What kind of thread and how do you do it?

#57 ewaskew

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 03:31 PM

You can stick a double layer of masking tape on both sides of your door line
and if it slips the tape gets the damage.

Like someone said take your time.

I cut the doors and trunk on a 1/12 scale 69Camaro and it took 2 hours,but
the end result was worth the extra effort.

As for using the sewing thread I found out that I didn't have enough hands
for that'when it came to working it back and forth and tring to hold the body
while I did it.

#58 JustBill

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 05:21 PM

Sewing thread? What kind of thread and how do you do it?



Just regular sewing thread you would use to sew on buttons or repair clothing with. You can find it just about anywhere. I usually buy a sewing kit. Comes with lots of thread and some needles and such.

Like I said its very time consuming and can be tricky as stated above trying to hold everything. I use a little vise to hold my project in while doing this. Just make a little slice in the door jamb and insert the thread through it. Then work the thread back and forth. This method also works good for suspension parts if you want to separate them.

Maybe not the best method, I just like that it removes very little plastic.

#59 Bastardo

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 10:08 PM

I fully-opened a Fiat 131 using a scriber. I just pulled the scriber along the pannel lines slowly, taking out a few 1/100s of a milimeter at the time. Yeah, it takes time and patience, but during one DVD you'll have 'er fully open :D

#60 tylersloan

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Posted 12 March 2011 - 05:27 PM

ok thanks guys ill try it wish i could post up some pictures of my build but my computer is acting up