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what type of airbrush do you use?


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Poll: Airbrush. single or dual action? (57 member(s) have cast votes)

what is your favorite all around modeling airbrush of choice. Singe action, dual, other?

  1. Single action. (19 votes [31.15%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.15%

  2. Voted Dual action. (39 votes [63.93%])

    Percentage of vote: 63.93%

  3. I only use spraycans. (3 votes [4.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.92%

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#41 DrewCfromSC

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 03:51 PM

Ok now the next phase. What regulated pressure ranges do you like to run you airbrush at for painting? Thanks everyone for the great replies here!
Drew

#42 Karmodeler2

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 08:54 PM

Ok now the next phase. What regulated pressure ranges do you like to run you airbrush at for painting? Thanks everyone for the great replies here!
Drew


Depends on the gun and the paint being used. Is the paint super super thin? Then very low pressure. If it's thick, a lot of pressure. Am I using an HVLP gun? They require 40 psi at the input to provide a 20-25 psi at the tip.

If I am using Alclad chrome, I shoot no more that 4-5 psi. Other paints in my airbrush I run 15-25...depends on the paint. My Devilbiss I use 40-50 psi to get a solid 25-30 at the tip which is the green band on the gauge for the gun. I mostly do it by feel and by sound/flow, but I've been doing it for 18+ years, so a lot of it is by feel and what sounds right.

And I'm using CO2 so my numbers may be different than those using compressed air.

David

#43 DrewCfromSC

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 12:54 AM

Depends on the gun and the paint being used. Im using a Badger 175 now. Is the paint super super thin? Then very low pressure. If it's thick, a lot of pressure. Am I using an HVLP gun? They require 40 psi at the input to provide a 20-25 psi at the tip. Looking for a compressor and just curious of the pressure range needed for setting up my inline airline regulator and gauge. Im using a 15 foot hardline with 2 water seperators and a regulator with a dump valve. These were leftover from my garage from my old house. Need to buy a new gauge as mine has a crack in the glass. Buy a 0-30 or 0-60 psi?
If I am using Alclad chrome, I shoot no more that 4-5 psi. Other paints in my airbrush I run 15-25...depends on the paint. My Devilbiss I use 40-50 psi to get a solid 25-30 at the tip which is the green band on the gauge for the gun. I mostly do it by feel and by sound/flow, but I've been doing it for 18+ years, so a lot of it is by feel and what sounds right. Is their a chart somewhere (paints, clears, or gun type) to help a new airbrush user? Im familuar with using full size guns for painting actual cars but want to learn this hobby too.
And I'm using CO2 so my numbers may be different than those using compressed air. Good point! Thanks for the info! Drew C. from S.C.

#44 Karmodeler2

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 05:48 PM

Depends on the gun and the paint being used. Im using a Badger 175 now. Is the paint super super thin? Then very low pressure. If it's thick, a lot of pressure. Am I using an HVLP gun? They require 40 psi at the input to provide a 20-25 psi at the tip. Looking for a compressor and just curious of the pressure range needed for setting up my inline airline regulator and gauge. Im using a 15 foot hardline with 2 water seperators and a regulator with a dump valve. These were leftover from my garage from my old house. Need to buy a new gauge as mine has a crack in the glass. Buy a 0-30 or 0-60 psi?
If I am using Alclad chrome, I shoot no more that 4-5 psi. Other paints in my airbrush I run 15-25...depends on the paint. My Devilbiss I use 40-50 psi to get a solid 25-30 at the tip which is the green band on the gauge for the gun. I mostly do it by feel and by sound/flow, but I've been doing it for 18+ years, so a lot of it is by feel and what sounds right. Is their a chart somewhere (paints, clears, or gun type) to help a new airbrush user? Im familuar with using full size guns for painting actual cars but want to learn this hobby too.
And I'm using CO2 so my numbers may be different than those using compressed air. Good point! Thanks for the info! Drew C. from S.C.



Hey Drew,
Might want to buy some cheap plastic sheets ("For Sale" signs or "Beware of Dog" signs come to mind as they are cheap and normally white on the back) and practice with different PSIs and mixes. Unfortunately, I can't give you a "set" PSI, however, you should be able with your experience to test a few and see. Also, spoons are a great way of testing paints/primers/compatibility issues and the like. You can even write in the inside of the spoon the color mix, and spray the backside. Drill a hole in the handle and hang it up for a paint chip rack. If you need that color again, you have the mix.
If you have experience with the full size guns, then airbrushing for you will be a piece of cake. I would recommend the 60 psi gauge over the 30...you may never know when you need it and if you buy the 60, you get the 30. If you buy the 30, you DONT get the 60.
There is no chart that I know of and the best teacher is you. Get your gun, a blank canvas and some paint mixed up in different cups (I use disposable cups or containers like pudding or applesauce come in....my mother-in-law saves everything plastic for me.....great woman!!)
Mark on the outside of the cups the mix (like 70 paint/30 thinner) and then test different PSIs. Get a piece of paper, write down your test data and create your own chart for a guide. I would do several sprayouts going from 70% paint and 30% thinner, and then start changing the ratio until I was at 40 % paint and 60% thinner and see what PSIs worked the best and what kind of coverage the paint gave me.

A normal size compressor (like at Home Depot, not the big mamma, but the 20 gal) is more than enough to push the psi you need for an airbrush. You will need a regulator other than the one on the compressor, near your booth or where ever you paint. It sucks to use the one on the compressor if it's set high to run air tools (like mine) and you need to bleed it off to do model painting. Use one closer to the paint booth and you can fine tune it much more accurately with a gauge that only goes to 60, instead of 150 like the one on the compressor. I have a small one on my little compressor and the increments on the gauge show increments of 1 psi. Very accurate. I can't read 4 PSI on my 30 gal compressor because each mark on the gauge is about 7-8 PSI and I can't fine tune it like I can the small one.


The mix/PSI formula is something that I wish I could pass on to you, but I generally do it all by feel and sound and that is something you will develop when you practice like I mentioned above. I don't think there is a source for what you need for mix/PSI when it comes to model paints like there is with the PPG cards and stuff. It's just trial and error.
Good Luck.
David

You can call me if you have questions and I'll try my best to help you.
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#45 Brett Barrow

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 08:10 PM

I gravitated to airbrushes years ago because I had too many projects ruined by Testors rattle cans. After hours of body prep, I would proceed to get the paint ready (shaking the can, heating it in warm water, etc). Then, depending on the whims of the model gods, the infamous Testors nozzles would do one of the following:

a ) ejaculate viscous globs of paint in a pattern that only Jackson Pollock could appreciate
b ) allow a trickle of runny paint to spurt out 1/2 inch from the can. To get a proper visual of this, imagine trying to stop a bout of dysentery with half a cork.
c ) spray paint in a usable manner. I can't recall if this ever actually happened on one of my projects, but a few of my friends say they had some success, and they don't lie very often.

That said, I couldn't seem to manage varying the pressure on rattle cans. To me, they were the virtual equivalent of trying to sketch with a log. I'll take the extra effort of the airbrush any day.


That's perfect!!! That's my experience exactly!!!


Book? What Book? I want that book? I need that book!


I have both editions of Bob's book it's great and I highly recommend it! Also, there's a special edition of FineScale Modeler out now called How To Paint and Weather Scale Models #2 that has a great step-by-step painting article from Bob on a Monogram 427 Cobra that's very similar to the content in the book and is a fraction of the price. I hate to pitch the other guys on this forum, I wouldn't do it if Bob wasn't a member here!

#46 DrewCfromSC

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 12:55 AM

Might want to buy some cheap plastic sheets and practice with different PSIs and mixes.Cool idea, we have some at work. You can even write in the inside of the spoon the color mix, and spray the backside. Thats agreat idea!
I would recommend the 60 psi gauge over the 30. I will buy both at work tomorrow!...
There is no chart that I know of and the best teacher is you. Darn it was hoping like auto paints! Get your gun, a blank canvas and some paint mixed up in different cups (I use disposable cups or containers like pudding or applesauce come in....my mother-in-law saves everything plastic for me.....great woman!!) I will start saving mine from liunch. non in laws gotta love em!Mark on the outside of the cups the mix (like 70 paint/30 thinner) and then test different PSIs. Get a piece of paper, write down your test data and create your own chart for a guide. I have done this with autopainting! Wow I gotta start thinking the same but smaller!

A normal size compressor (like at Home Depot, not the big mamma, but the 20 gal) is more than enough to push the psi you need for an airbrush. Im looking at a used Badger silent compressor from another model member. Im saving up to buy it. I have a monster compressor in my old house but it will be sold with the home. You will need a regulator other than the one on the compressor, near your booth or where ever you paint. Got part of my old line. It has a inline water (toilet paper style)seperator[/color I have a small one on my little compressor and the increments on the gauge show increments of 1 psi. Very accurate. Have you seen the digital battery ones?

Good Luck.
David

You can call me if you have questions and I'll try my best to help you.
864 979 1844
[/quote]
I have your numner. Feel free to email me through my website. www.ridebyshootings.com [color="#FF0000"]Hey were neighbors.........kind of! Hope to meet you someday and buy you a cup of coffeee or sweet tea! Thanks. Drew from S.C.


#47 DrewCfromSC

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 12:57 AM

I have both editions of Bob's book it's great and I highly recommend it! Also, there's a special edition of FineScale Modeler out now called How To Paint and Weather Scale Models #2 that has a great step-by-step painting article from Bob on a Monogram 427 Cobra that's very similar to the content in the book and is a fraction of the price. I hate to pitch the other guys on this forum, I wouldn't do it if Bob wasn't a member here!
[/quote]

Thanks. I may have seen this book yesterday but it was a magazine at the magazine stand? Where can I find this book online? Drew C.

Edited by zwitterman, 18 July 2010 - 12:58 AM.


#48 Brett Barrow

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 05:35 AM

[quote name='zwitterman' date='18 July 2010 - 06:57 AM' timestamp='1279450641' post='336374']
I have both editions of Bob's book it's great and I highly recommend it! Also, there's a special edition of FineScale Modeler out now called How To Paint and Weather Scale Models #2 that has a great step-by-step painting article from Bob on a Monogram 427 Cobra that's very similar to the content in the book and is a fraction of the price. I hate to pitch the other guys on this forum, I wouldn't do it if Bob wasn't a member here!
[/quote]

Thanks. I may have seen this book yesterday but it was a magazine at the magazine stand? Where can I find this book online? Drew C.
[/quote]
Yes, it's a magazine, I saw it at my local Borders. You can get it online at FineScale's siteunder "Special Issues", if the pop-up ad for it doesn't hit you first!

#49 Karmodeler2

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 07:14 AM

[color="#FF0000"]Im looking at a used Badger silent compressor from another model member. Im saving up to buy it.


That is the perfect size and it may already have a regulator on it. If not, you can get them at home depot. Might have to pick up some reducing fittings to make it fit the smaller stuff. You can take the compressor in and match up what you need for the regulator and the line to the airbrush.
Good Luck.
And I'll take you up on that glass of sweet tea.....my favorite beverage!!!

David

#50 charlie8575

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Posted 18 July 2010 - 11:38 AM

I gravitated to airbrushes years ago because I had too many projects ruined by Testors rattle cans. After hours of body prep, I would proceed to get the paint ready (shaking the can, heating it in warm water, etc). Then, depending on the whims of the model gods, the infamous Testors nozzles would do one of the following:

a ) ejaculate viscous globs of paint in a pattern that only Jackson Pollock could appreciate
b ) allow a trickle of runny paint to spurt out 1/2 inch from the can. To get a proper visual of this, imagine trying to stop a bout of dysentery with half a cork.
c ) spray paint in a usable manner. I can't recall if this ever actually happened on one of my projects, but a few of my friends say they had some success, and they don't lie very often.

That said, I couldn't seem to manage varying the pressure on rattle cans. To me, they were the virtual equivalent of trying to sketch with a log. I'll take the extra effort of the airbrush any day.

:mellow: :blink: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: I almost fell off the couch reading this.

Your points are all very valid and well-taken though.

Take this act on the road...you'll make a mint.

Charlie Larkin

#51 LoneWolf15

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 07:50 AM

Paache H series using the # 5 head and needle . For the cost of 6 cans of spray paint you can own one, that includes shipping ! Much more control , smoother finishes , economical , user friendly , etc !An airbrush can't be beat !

Donn Yost
Lone Wolf Custom Painting

#52 Brett Barrow

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 08:52 AM

Paache H series using the # 5 head and needle . For the cost of 6 cans of spray paint you can own one, that includes shipping ! Much more control , smoother finishes , economical , user friendly , etc !An airbrush can't be beat !

Donn Yost
Lone Wolf Custom Painting

Wow, first we had the guy who wrote the book, now we have the guy who turned it into a movie!!! :lol:

Edited by Brett Barrow, 19 July 2010 - 08:53 AM.


#53 Chas SCR

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 09:09 AM

I use a Paashe VL for 90% of every thing. Use Du Pont paints and never had to thin them or any thing and shoot them no more then 12psi.. If I use the Alsa Chrome I shoot that no more then 3 to 4 psi at the tip. Clear coat is Du Pont Hot Hues and still no thinning needed and shoot it at 8psi.

#54 Marc @ MPC Motorsports

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 09:16 AM

Paache H series using the # 5 head and needle . For the cost of 6 cans of spray paint you can own one, that includes shipping ! Much more control , smoother finishes , economical , user friendly , etc !An airbrush can't be beat !

Donn Yost
Lone Wolf Custom Painting

I have two Paasche H's. One I bought new and a gently used on I paid $10 on Ebay. One is dedicated to acrylics and the other for solvent-based paints.

#55 crazyjim

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 11:00 AM

That's the Paasche H series single action?

#56 LoneWolf15

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Posted 19 July 2010 - 06:37 PM

One and the same , Jim !

I love a dual action , used a Badger 150 for decades when I was playing in Trainland . When it comes to model cars , it's a single action . Unless you are doing murals or intricate paint schemes , a dual action is overkill . They require much more maintenence then a single action , which can be frustrating for the novice . Walk before you run ! Buy the single action , become adept with it , if you want to take the step up to a dual action after you've mastered the single , then do so ! I can take apart my Paache , clean it , and have it back together in 5 minutes , try that with a dual action . It yain't gonna happen , Kids !

On a note to the gentleman that stated he wanted to learn to use spray cans first.... An airbrush is nothing more than a spray can . Diffrence being , you have absolute control over it ! You control how your paint is mixed and then applied . It is much easier to mist coat , slowly building up your coats without runs or sags in the paint .. One guy in a factory having a bad day mixing paint for spray cans in a factory is going to spell doom and gloom for the modelers buying the spray cans that were produced on that particular day !

With an airbrush , that problem , which is a common occurence , goes away ! Spitting cans . running paint , heavy orange peal , or the cans not working at all , are now just a bad memory . You control every facet of your paint with an airbrush . Your environment , the mix ratio , your psi rate , etc , all of these things , are now controlled by you !

People make airbrushing out to be some great mystery , it's not ! Develop a system , stick to it , and painting with an airbrush becomes second nature , just like breathing !

Donn Yost

Lone Wolf Custom Painting

#57 Karmodeler2

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 08:11 AM

I can take apart my Paache , clean it , and have it back together in 5 minutes , try that with a dual action . It yain't gonna happen , Kids !
Donn Yost

Lone Wolf Custom Painting


Hey Donn,
great advice! I too, used to swear by the H, but now find myself using the Double more often than not. I even mix cones and needles to get different spray patterns (A #1 needle with a #5 cone). And I'm not issuing a challenge, but I can break down, clean and re-assemble my double in less than 5 minutes....but I have 15+ years of doing it and a set system as you mentioned, so I'm "cheating". A new guy will take a longer.
I hope you make it to ATL this year in November. I'm looking forward to seeing some of your work in person.
David

#58 Stang67

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 11:21 AM

Paasche double action I used it when I did graphic work. When I went back to models it seemed natural. I can have it apart like a rifle and back together in less time then it took me to type this line!! B)

PS. OK, I'm thinking about a single action.

#59 Bridgebuster

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 02:24 PM

starting to look at airbrushes for modeling. What do you use, single action or dual? Like about the features etc?
Thanks for your replies.
Drew from S.C.


I recently went through the same dilema. After much asking and looking, I got a Paasche H single action. Don Yost uses this gun and recommends it as all he needs. Don turns out some of the most incredible models and paintjobs I've ever seen. If it doesn work out, I can always use my son's Iwata double action. Not sure which model it is, but he does extremely fine / close work on latex masks (primarily the "Predator" character) for resale and they're awesome.
Besides the fact that Don recommends it, I know how I am and I fear the double action wouldn't get cleaned well enough to avoid clogging problems. That's just me.

#60 Brett Barrow

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 05:11 PM

Hey Donn,
great advice! I too, used to swear by the H, but now find myself using the Double more often than not. I even mix cones and needles to get different spray patterns (A #1 needle with a #5 cone). And I'm not issuing a challenge, but I can break down, clean and re-assemble my double in less than 5 minutes....but I have 15+ years of doing it and a set system as you mentioned, so I'm "cheating". A new guy will take a longer.
I hope you make it to ATL this year in November. I'm looking forward to seeing some of your work in person.
David

I agree! You have to do that weird balancing act to get the tip off a single-action external-mix, plus with the Paasche H you'll spend 15 minutes looking for the allen wrench to loosen the set screw, and if you drop that.... I prefer the Badger 350 for a single/external, but it's plastic and feels chanky next to an H. The easiest brush to tear down, by far, is the Badger 155, and I should know, I used to tear down all the different airbrushes in the Hobby Shop when it would get slow!!! I can honestly say I can do it blindfolded, it's been proven!

If Donn gets good results with a Paasche H, that's great. We could all get Michealangelo's paintbrush, but that doesn't mean we'd be able to paint the Sistine Chapel. I believe good paint jobs come down to the Five P's- Preparation, Practice, Priming, Polishing, and Preparation!!!!! B)