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Making specific colors?


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#1 Fierofool

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 02:49 AM

I have a new model I want to paint, but I'm very stuck on the color. I'm looking for a very warm, light metallica orange. More towards yellow than red. I havent seen anything in a spray can that's even close to what I'm after, so I think I'll need to make my own. How would you make a light metallic orange? I don't have an airbrush but I'm convinced I'll need to buy one. Any tips on what paint/brush/brands anything like that? I've never mixed my own paint, just shot from a rattle-can.

Thanks!
Blake

#2 diymirage

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:14 AM

how about model masters turn signal amber ?

the bottle looks like this

Posted Image

but sprayed over model masters german silver (also a metallic paint) it looks like this

Posted Image


id imagine you can get a more warm reddish colour by spraying it over a red basecoat

#3 Peter Lombardo

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:20 AM

Blake, first off, welcome to the forum….lots of talent and lots of know how in one place.

Really, you only have two choices with painting car models. Rattle cans and airbrush. I use both and both have their place. If you want to get into custom colors and unique paint jobs, you really need an airbrush. Give this some thought….if you are serious, you need an airbrush. Go to your local hobby shop or art and craft store like Michaels and look around. I have two airbrushes, one cheaper, an Astek which works very well, if you keep it clean, and a more expensive Paasehe which also works great if you keep it clean. With an air brush you will need a source of compressed air. You can get cans of air (I have never used them) or a compressor. I have three of them. For painting I use a regulator, it goes between the compressor and the air brush hose. It controls the flow of air and traps any water that is produced in the compressor from getting into the air and therefore you paint job….P.S. water in the air is a very bad thing.

If you stick with rattle cans, you are limited to the colors available, but with the air brush there is no limit. I mix my own paint colors all of the time, it is not that difficult to do.

Lately I discovered Jacquard Pearl Pigments. I get them at either A.C. Moore, Michaels or an art store. They are a very, very fine grind paint pigment. They make around 30 colors….all different, all pearls and many what they call “Duo” which are really just “Flip-flop” colors…so from one direction they look, oh say, pink pearl, and from the other Blue pearl…really neat stuff. A bottle costs under $4.00 and if used properly, will get you 20 or so paint jobs. All I do is mix a very small amount of one, two or even three pigments into about an ounce of clear lacquer, although, you could use clear Tamiya or even Enamel if that is the type of paint you are using.

You may have to thin down the paint depending on how thick the clear is, but it doesn’t need much thinner to get it right. The rule of thumb for airbrush paint is it should be the consistence of whole milk.

Like I said, I sometimes use the rattle cans because they are rather quick and easy, but for real control and a variety of colors and custom work, you really need an airbrush.

If you are going to be painting with vehicles with either, it is very important to remember a few basics. One, wash the car in hot soapy water first to remove any remains of the mold release agent the factory used. Two, lightly sand off any mold lines…also after you have done a few cars, look for obvious dips and sunken craters that will need to be filled. If you fill them, get a good putty (Tamiya is the best, but no longer imported…I get mine from Japan….HLJ.com to be exact.) Once dry, sand smooth using a very fine sandpaper last. Three, prime the car body with the proper kind of primer. I always use Rust-oleum Automotive Primer that I get at the hardware store for around $5.00. I works with all paint, even the hottest Lacquers (“hot” means a paint that un-primered, will eat into the plastic car body and cause the surface plastic to melt and get all “icky”. Four, lightly sand the primer to get the body smooth and possible touch up any areas that need it. Five, when you have the body ready for paint, you must decide if the top coat will need a lighter base under it or not. Almost all top colors will look different depending upon what is underneath it. So, even though this primer that I use is light gray, sometimes I put down a layer of white paint to lighten up under the top color. An example of this is, say yellow. The yellow will appear darker over the primer without a layer of white between them…but if the top color is darker, then the added layer is really unnecessary. Six, many advocate heating the rattle can (assuming you are using a rattle can here) in hot water to bring the air pressure up inside the can, thin out the paint a bit and help it flow better. I have done this and don’t really find a big improvement over not doing it, but either way, it is very important to shake the can vigorously to get the paint mixed up and the gases in the can rather excited. Next and this is very important. Be sure to build up the color coats very slowly. Fight the impulse to do it all in one sitting. Lay down the color coat with a few light mist coats and give the paint a chance to build up. It is best to wait about 10 minutes or so between coats. You want the layer under the next coat to be just tacky enough so that the next layer will cling to the layer below it as this will help to eliminate any possible runs from aggressive paint application. The last coat should be a little heavier so that you get a nice smooth finish. Always begin pressing the rattle can button just off to the side of the car and then sweep the flow of paint over the car in one smooth steady motion. Never, and I mean never start the paint out of the can while aimed at the car….this is a great way to get bops and imperfections in the paint. Always begin off the car, and sweep onto the car.

Seven, once done, LEAVE IT ALONE for a few days. Make sure it is in a dust free location, and always remember try to paint on “dry” days with very little humidity in the air….the water in the air will effect the finish and the drying time.

Eight, if the paint is dry and looks good, you can now A….leave it as it is, B…sand it with a polishing kit ( this is another whole story in its self ) and rub it out with wax polish or C….clear coat it, lightly sand it and clear coat it.

Nine, Many advocate, me one of them, using Future floor polish to put the final coat on the painted car. This stuff is great, an I could do another post on its use and advantages, but for now, it is easy to use this with just a larger soft brush. It is self-leveling so you can either apply with a brush or air brush (I have done both and see no real difference). You get it in the local food market or hardware store. Just brush on a light layer of Future, allow it to dry and even a so-so paint finish will jump to life with a new sparkle.

If you are going to apply bare metal foil, I would do it before the Future coat and allow the Future to basically “seal” the edges of the BMF.

That is it for painting, the way I see it. I hope this helps you. Others may have a different view or technique and that is fine as there are many ways to do these things. Good luck, but if I were you, knowing what I know, I would go out and buy a Astek airbrush and a small compressor, the regulator can wait a few months, but I would begin airbrushing as soon as possible….your cars and their paint will thank you for it.


#4 Fierofool

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 05:08 AM

Awesome! Thanks guys, that helps a lot. I think i need to get an airbrush and start playing around with it. As far as color goes, the closest thing i found online was this lambo: Posted Image

#5 MikeMc

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:42 AM

What you should look at is HOK by Black Gold.
The color you show is a cross between HOK Tangelo Orange Pearl and Sunrise Yellow....Both come in rattle cans...

Posted Image

Posted Image

#6 charlie8575

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 01:22 PM

I'll second Peter with the Aztek; I have an A320, and it's a great airbrush. I might move up to Paasche this year, but an Aztek is a great, well-made product, and it's easy to keep clean.

For a compressor, you might go get a Testor Mighty-Mite, many year ago, when Wal-Mart still handled models, I bought one for about $60. Best modeling tool dollars I ever spent aside from a Xuron sprue cutter.

A Mighty-Mite and an A320 will probably cost you around $120, and with reasonable care, will last for many years. A little too tight for you? Check Craigslist for a small used compressor and spring for the new airbrush.

Charlie Larkin

#7 charlie8575

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 01:25 PM

On the subject of mixing colors-

Does anyone happen to have a chart or some kind of guide on how to mix paints? For example, to achieve color "a," mix proportions of colors "b" and "c?"

I may have to do a little mixing, and would like to know if anyone found a guide for mixing paints successfully.

Charlie Larkin

#8 camarobuilder

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 01:28 PM

Check out black golds site.My link

#9 diymirage

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:18 PM

I'll second Peter with the Aztek; I have an A320, and it's a great airbrush. I might move up to Paasche this year, but an Aztek is a great, well-made product, and it's easy to keep clean.

For a compressor, you might go get a Testor Mighty-Mite, many year ago, when Wal-Mart still handled models, I bought one for about $60. Best modeling tool dollars I ever spent aside from a Xuron sprue cutter.

A Mighty-Mite and an A320 will probably cost you around $120, and with reasonable care, will last for many years. A little too tight for you? Check Craigslist for a small used compressor and spring for the new airbrush.

Charlie Larkin



dont forget to sing up for email updates and coupons for micheals and hobby lobby, both of them frequently send out 40 or 50 % of one item
that will definatly soften the blow to the old wallet on that brush and compressor, even if it means making two trips so you can use two coupons

#10 Tonioseven

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 03:27 PM

Posted Image