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quick question about paints


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#1 Curtis v.

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 11:13 AM

i always use model spray paints but i wasnt sure if you could use automotive spray paint (like from a auto parts store) on models so can you? and if you can what do you have to do for prep? any help is appreciated.

#2 mr68gts

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 11:21 AM

You can use automotive paints on models but you need to use the specific primer with it. Some of the "hotter" paints will craze the plastic. Use a barrier/sealer and primer and you'll be good to go.
Do look into a automotive grade respirator though (and really for all painting chores) as they are more harmful than model paints.
Paul

#3 Guest_Markus355_*

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 11:58 AM

duplicolour primer.

#4 Nick Winter

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 12:04 PM

duplicolour primer.

I agree, This Camaro has Duplicolor Primer, Duplicolor Paint's, Dplicolor Clear
Posted Image

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#5 charlie8575

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 12:54 AM

I prefer Plasti-Kote over Dupli-Color primer, it's a little less "hot" chemically than Dupli-Color, which can cause problems on some of the softer plastics.

Plasti-Kote's a little tough to find (most Car-Quest stores carry it,) but it's worth seeking out. Generally, the sandable primer is very nice. It's a bit lighter in consistency, so it doesn't cover detail as much. The white sandable primer almost doesn't even need sanding.

Another thing to keep in mind- Dupli-Color has reformulated its paint over the last year, and the "gray" sandable primer is now almost black- not the ideal color of primer for most applications.

Plasti-Kote can also be used under any and all lacquers and enamels without any difficulty.

Charlie Larkin

#6 Jared Roach

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 01:25 AM

I can't personally find Plasti-Kote primer anywhere's, so I always use duplicolors sandable grey primer. It works great and it always gets the job done good. The primer I bought two days ago is grey, and they just got it in the store I always buy it from.

#7 scale trucker

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 02:55 PM

automotive laquer primer sprayed a little dry 3m scuff pad then any auto paint you want..i do it all the time then i clear with omni clear..

#8 Eric Stone

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 03:03 PM

...

Another thing to keep in mind- Dupli-Color has reformulated its paint over the last year, and the "gray" sandable primer is now almost black- not the ideal color of primer for most applications.

...


That sounds like the "Hot Rod Gray" primer. I think their normal gray primer is still the same.

#9 High octane

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 03:36 PM

You can use automotive paints on models but you need to use the specific primer with it. Some of the "hotter" paints will craze the plastic. Use a barrier/sealer and primer and you'll be good to go.
Do look into a automotive grade respirator though (and really for all painting chores) as they are more harmful than model paints.
Paul



AMEN on the respirator advice Paul. I wished that I had been using on all these years as those fumes are also bad for your liver. I really enjoyed ALL the lacquer fumes, but I now realize that I would have been much better off using a respirator while spray painting.

#10 Bruno

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 04:34 PM

I would add this; spray light coats, both primer and paint, especially if using solvent basecoats. I prefer waterborne basecoats because it is less agressive on the plastic. Now the clearcoat, here you can spray wet coats (I use 2 part urethane clear and usually spray one light coat, then one wet coat). Let the basecoat dry a few hours before spraying the clearcoat. Sometimes I use a hair dryer to help the primer/paint flash dry faster so it wont have the time to attack the plastic. But don't use the hair dryer for the clear.