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FULL BUILD REVIEW: 1/12 Revell Shelby Mustang GT500


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#41 Kaleb

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 12:43 PM

Most of us cant afford these higher prices, While I do buy and collect model cars, die-cast and plastic I still shop for bargains. It seems like 90% of builders want these models to be real. I know building has progressed and some are super detailed and terrific looking. But those like myself don't buy pocher and most tamiya kits for this reason. I give thumbs up to revell for helping us guys out that want to build bigger kits without the high price. Is it really the kit or the low price?

#42 Darin Bastedo

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 09:14 AM


My sentiments exactly. Looks like Revell's priority was keeping the price down, not making the best kit possible. Probably a smart business move, but disappointing to those of us like Christian and myself that expect better (and are willing to pay for better). Of course one could argue that any competent modeler could add the opening doors and trunk and missing or simplified details...and that's true enough... but still, I would have preferred a far more detailed kit at a higher price than an enlarged 1/24 scale kit at a "bargain" price.



Most people who buy 1:12 scale buy because of the impressive size not the detail, and that is why you see a lot more 1:12 scale Revell - Monogram 1:12 scale kits build than Tamiya, doyusha, and Pocher. The business case is there for simple to build large scale kits. If super detail was so important in this market Pocher would still be selling kits.

#43 Harry P.

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 09:28 AM



Most people who buy 1:12 scale buy because of the impressive size not the detail, and that is why you see a lot more 1:12 scale Revell - Monogram 1:12 scale kits build than Tamiya, doyusha, and Pocher. The business case is there for simple to build large scale kits. If super detail was so important in this market Pocher would still be selling kits.


Pocher never made anything but 1/8 scale kits, and they never catered to the casual modeler. They were definitely "upscale" kits aimed at advanced builders, with exceptional detail and priced where they had to be priced in order to make the best kits possible. They never cut corners in order to appeal to the masses (except for their very last release, a 1993 Porsche 911, which was a mere shadow of earlier Pocher releases). And they didn't go out of business due to poor sales, but a rather complicated mix of mismanagement, an ill-fated sale, and a factory fire that sort of put the final nail in their coffin.

I have to disagree with your point that large scale kits are bought simply because they're "big." I think that one of the greatest selling points of a large-scale kit is the detail level possible; far greater than in smaller scales.

I think they missed the mark a bit on this kit. Yeah, I know... it's relatively "cheap," so a lot of people will be happy about that. But they could have put a little more effort into it and also pleased the more advanced builders... adding separate wipers, not molding the brake disks and calipers in one piece (which would have made for easier detailing and a much more realistic final appearance), maybe separate metal springs for the struts... a small PE sheet with emblems, that sort of thing. Sure it may have added a few bucks to the MSRP, but it would have made for a more satisfying building experience.

I'm not down on the kit... having a new, large scale kit is a good thing. But it could have been better, and not for all that much more money.

#44 Harry P.

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 10:49 AM

It is what is ... buy it if you like it; pass if you don't.


Well, yeah... that's true of any model!

But if we all take that attitude and not say anything about anything, it would make for an awfully quiet forum, wouldn't it??? :)

#45 Harry P.

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 12:23 PM

And, despite the simplification, I would once again defy anyone to look at the pic of the built model in the other thread and then tell me this kit is lacking in anything.
I'd still rather have the big Mustang for $70 than I would the Trumpeter Falcon for $50 ... any day of the week and twice on Sunday.


You're making a comparison that's irrelevant.

What Trumpeter did or didn't do with their Falcon has nothing to do with what Revell did or didn't do with this kit.

If you think the Revell Mustang is a good kit and you like it, then fine... but I reserve my right to think otherwise.

#46 Darin Bastedo

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 12:44 PM


Pocher never made anything but 1/8 scale kits, and they never catered to the casual modeler. They were definitely "upscale" kits aimed at advanced builders, with exceptional detail and priced where they had to be priced in order to make the best kits possible. They never cut corners in order to appeal to the masses (except for their very last release, a 1993 Porsche 911, which was a mere shadow of earlier Pocher releases). And they didn't go out of business due to poor sales, but a rather complicated mix of mismanagement, an ill-fated sale, and a factory fire that sort of put the final nail in their coffin.

I have to disagree with your point that large scale kits are bought simply because they're "big." I think that one of the greatest selling points of a large-scale kit is the detail level possible; far greater than in smaller scales.

I think they missed the mark a bit on this kit. Yeah, I know... it's relatively "cheap," so a lot of people will be happy about that. But they could have put a little more effort into it and also pleased the more advanced builders... adding separate wipers, not molding the brake disks and calipers in one piece (which would have made for easier detailing and a much more realistic final appearance), maybe separate metal springs for the struts... a small PE sheet with emblems, that sort of thing. Sure it may have added a few bucks to the MSRP, but it would have made for a more satisfying building experience.

I'm not down on the kit... having a new, large scale kit is a good thing. But it could have been better, and not for all that much more money.


Having run a hobby shop in the past as well as having been a dealer traveling to shows and swap meets I have to say that Revell made the right decision. The expensive High detail kits simply don't sell, some of them even when marked down well below cost. The typical model simply won't spend as much for a kit, than the typical forum member, and even we are called cheap sometimes. To the general model building public These big kits are hot sellers for birthdays and christmas presents. with few exceptions the people never bought these for themselves. Same thing with the nearly un-buildable clear engine kits and such. These kits are novelties and are usually released in the third quarter so they are on the shelves before christmas. Keep in mind also for the average builder, while it allows for more detail it also makes mistakes more visible. The less there is to screw up the better.

#47 Darin Bastedo

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 12:45 PM


You're making a comparison that's irrelevant.

What Trumpeter did or didn't do with their Falcon has nothing to do with what Revell did or didn't do with this kit.

If you think the Revell Mustang is a good kit and you like it, then fine... but I reserve my right to think otherwise.


The comparison is relevent because they will be on the same isle of the hobby shop and the consumer will be making a chioce on how to best spend his money.

#48 Harry P.

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 12:49 PM



I think it's very relevant in terms of which kit represents the better bargain ... and the Mustang wins that comparison in a walk, IMO,


Which model is the better "bargain" is open to debate, and you're comparing apples to oranges.

The Mustang is very simplified. It's basically nothing more than a double-sized 1/24 scale kit, with no extra features or details I would expect from a large scale kit, but selling for more than twice the price of a 1/24 scale kit.

The Falcon is an entirely different issue. Yeah, it's inaccurate and overpriced, but saying the Mustang is a better bargain than the Falcon is like saying a pair of jeans at $40 is a better bargain than a shirt at $25. There are two completely different sets of parameters at work.

#49 Chuck Kourouklis

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 02:47 PM

Well, speaking as a parts geek of the most rabidly OCD variety - opening doors, working suspension and steering, working lights, Pochers, Enthusiast Series, MFH, bring it all - I'm sittin' here jiggling my foot, finger-tapping my desk, doin' the full Kinison with the LHS every fifteen minutes: "Is it IN YET? Y'all GOT 'EM YET?? WHERE IZZIT??" about that 1/12 GT500. And it ain't just the subject that's got me beside myself about the first domestic twelfth-scaler in more than two decades - a 1:12 2010 Camaro or Challenger woulda been just as cool.

I sympathize with craving the dings and tweets of more bells and whistles, deeply. But it's not as if Revell/Monogram gave us the first reason to expect anything different. Look at Monogram's last five 1/12 models - none of them had opening doors. Only one even had poseable steering. The vintage Chevy subjects at least went as far as to offer a couple versions, but Monogram's large-scale philosophy has basically been set since the initial sales sluggishness of the Big Deuce and the color-matching boondoggle of the E-Type Jag; from the 1965 'Vette on, Monogram's big-scales just ain't been much more than bi-scale kits writ large. And I don't see anything as crude as the Testarossa or as misproportioned as the F-40 here.

Would I have LOVED engine hoses, opening doors, and steerable wheels? Eeeyyyooooouuu betcha.

I'll still take five, please.

Edited by Chuck Kourouklis, 23 August 2011 - 02:58 PM.


#50 Darin Bastedo

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 05:55 AM


Which model is the better "bargain" is open to debate, and you're comparing apples to oranges.

The Mustang is very simplified. It's basically nothing more than a double-sized 1/24 scale kit, with no extra features or details I would expect from a large scale kit, but selling for more than twice the price of a 1/24 scale kit.

The Falcon is an entirely different issue. Yeah, it's inaccurate and overpriced, but saying the Mustang is a better bargain than the Falcon is like saying a pair of jeans at $40 is a better bargain than a shirt at $25. There are two completely different sets of parameters at work.


It's only apples and oranges if scale is something that matters to you. What you have here is two different model cars, with similar price points. If I had to chose between the two I would chose the one that most faithfully captures the look of the prototype. If there were a third option like the 1/25 scale revell GT500 I would chose that as it offers similar levels of accuracy and I don't have to fingd the room to display a 1/12 size kit.

#51 Kaleb

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 06:24 AM

Will there not be upgrades for this car as well? On another note....I guess my skills (of what I do have) will be challenged to make this look close to a real car. Poor me I cant get $100+ kits I have to stick with these. Im not complaining about the level of detail.

O and btw if you want to compare revell to pocher and tamiya on their level of "detail" then you will be comparing apples and oranges, as far as I know revell caters to the average builder as to where tamiya is more advanced in some cases, and pocher for the advanced, as well deep pockets.

#52 Chuck Kourouklis

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 08:25 AM


Exactly, Chuck. And, I'll go back to the point I made in the other thread (or maybe it was in this one; I've lost track) ... the last newly-tooled 1/12 scale automotive kit prior to this one was the Trumpeter GT-40. It had a lot of those "bells and whistles" you mentioned. List price: $250.

Now comes this Shelby kit, sans bells and whistles. List price: $69.95.

That $180 price differential will buy you a hell of a lot of bells and whistles! ;)


And here's the funny bit: Scale Motorsport is evidently planning a detail kit for this one - after judging the Trumpeter kit too "toy-like" for such a treatment...

#53 Cato

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 10:40 AM

I made this same observation on page 1, post #19:

I'd be very surprised if Matthew did an upgrade kit for this after having passed on the GT 40. This seems nicely molded but as 'toy-like' as he considered the GT.


And yes, I built the GT 40 but will not buy this 'GT500'.

#54 Chuck Kourouklis

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:14 PM

Well, guess it depends on what constitutes "toy-like" then, doesn't it?

If simplified parts that at least look like their prototypes count as toy-like, then yeah, Matthew may not go here.

But if missing distributors, blocky tires, and out-of-scale heim joints are more the SMS "toy-like" criteria, then yes, the GT500 may have a shot.

The GT-40 was a moon shot that landed a bit short. This GT500 looks every bit the solid line drive the manufacturer intended.

Paradox though it may be, since Revell aimed lower, there's likely less for SMS to totally overhaul - therefore making a detail kit more feasible.

#55 Harry P.

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:31 PM

Paradox though it may be, since Revell aimed lower, there's likely less for SMS to totally overhaul - therefore making a detail kit more feasible.


I hope the detail kit includes valve stems... :rolleyes:

I know, I know... I'm being picky and had "unrealistic" expectations of this kit... :rolleyes: :lol:

#56 Harry P.

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:35 PM

Actually, for all my carping about the lack of detail and parts count on this kit (which I am serious about), I suppose the kit plus a reasonably well done detail set (that makes up for where Revell obviously cut corners) could still come in south of $100 if I can find a deal on the kit. Aside from the fact that I'll have to do a lot of stuff myself that I think Revell should have done in the first place, not a bad deal overall.

If the detail set lives up to my expectations I just may give this kit a shot.

#57 Chuck Kourouklis

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:39 PM


I hope the detail kit includes valve stems... :rolleyes:

I know, I know... I'm being picky and had "unrealistic" expectations of this kit... :rolleyes: :lol:


Oh what, the thing's missing valve stems?

No, Harry, I actually agree with you on that one.

#58 Cato

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 12:47 PM

But if missing distributors, blocky tires, and out-of-scale heim joints are more the SMS "toy-like" criteria, then yes, the GT500 may have a shot.

Yes Chuck, these and others were the bain of the 40. But I learned that Trump compromised the most where they felt things would not be seen-the tires being the big exception. Since they 'engineered ' a crappy tilt mechanism for the nose, the whole front suspension goes away (unless you scratch a permanently open tilt nose). The rear suspension and bogus throttle linkage is a scale horror and mostly seen. But no coil and dizzy go largely unnoticed. The cockpit is mostly well done and highly visible.
Revell however has all the compromises in plain sight although everything seems in scale and accurately molded. Given that an advanced modeler might open doors and trunk, SMS could do things like mirrors, scale hinges, trunk contents, PE wipers, F&R suspensions, coil packs, engine hoses and detail, etc....Don't think it would be under $100 though.

#59 Hawk312

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 03:46 PM

When can I get one??? :)

I am still glad Revell stuck with the less detail/lower price direction. The subject is right, the box art is impressive, it looks as though it will build into an impressive display piece without too much fiddling, and I think this has the potential to bring alot of people who would never build a model car into the hobby. The average Ford/Mustang guy, even though there might little interest in the hobby, by just looking at the box art and it`s impressive size and might decide to give our hobby a try. If it builds nicely, he may be hooked, and we have a new recruit. B) However, fiddling with a couple hundred parts, trying to get doors to line up just right, and painting 20 body panels instead of several, may result in losing that person and maybe another generation or two to the hobby forever.


Oh yeah....when can I get one??? :D :P

#60 prostockmania

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 03:59 PM

Well after a few nights of polishing with my arms almost falling off I got the paint very smooth. Then I applied the decal stripes. Be careful with them! They are thin, stick very easy and dont work really well with micro sol. But they hardly bleed at all. I used them for the sake of the review so everyone can see how they look. The 1:1 stripes are vinyl so using the decals is correct. But, painted stripes would also look very nice.
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I painted the chassis grey and fogged in some Grabber blue basecoat.
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under spray looks ok, but I've worked on the real 2011 Shelby and they dont have the underspray on them like they did in the old days.