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Tools for Scribing Panel Lines or Cutting Out Doors


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#41 Rider

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 09:43 AM

I'm with Peter on this method.

I did tried the thread method once with dental floss (herd it on another forum), didn't work out. I bet it would work if the body was secured.

I think it might work if ran the thread across a panel saw, ya know the mini hacksaw. Here's how I think it would have to work.

1 drill a hole in the exsisting panel line
2 thread the hole and attach to the saw
3 cut way

Humm, I'm going to try that tonight.

I have had great resaults with a .010 drill bit, on corners just drill a succession of holes and file it when you get the panel opened up.

Edited by Plastic Freak, 02 October 2009 - 09:44 AM.


#42 dwc43

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 03:55 PM

It's not hard at all to use the thread, it just does not give good results. When I did it I wrapped the thread and secured it in a set of medical style clamps. Anchor one clamp and hold the other one tight. Then move the model up and down the thread. The longer the thread the better cause you slide the model the full length of the thread and it spreads the heat over a longer distance so you have less thread breakage. In the end though, the results are not as good as using the very sharp edge of a micro chisel like I used.

#43 Gregg

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Posted 02 October 2009 - 05:31 PM

I swear by the thread method, not at it, like some of my friends here.
the trick is trial and error
Find the right thread
I think the articles "the big kahuna" did referenced some of the different thread types out there.
All of my cuts have been flawless, perfect, and everything fit just right.

I know what the problem was with Bill, he needs smaller knees!!!!
love yah!!

#44 Rider

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 05:12 AM

I'm willing to give it a try, I'm going to use marine thread. It's covered/coated/soaked I'm not sure which with some sort of waxy type material and the thread is extremely tough. I used to use it for making Moto Cross and Mountian bike body armour.
I'm going to try the hacksaw method, I'll put up my findings. Stay tuned.

#45 Rider

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 05:39 AM

Ok I just tried it out.

I used a Chevell 454 body from Revell.

I attached the body to the bench on it's side using a spring clamp.
Then I attached a few elastic bands to the skirt on the table with a c-clamp.
Next I attached the thread to the elastic.
This worked out pretty will and gave me a fee hand to steady the body, and the elastic worked as the "return" mechanisim for the thread.

In that short time I was able to complete one side of the door, pretty good for time. On the down side it does heat the plastic up to the point it gets "pulled" through on the panel and the door leaving a surface that needs to be sanded and finished. I also found it to be a worry not to burn outside the panel line.

All in all I think it would worked pretty good, I'd give it a 3.5 out of 5 ofr a rating, but who the H E double hockey sticks am I anyway.

I also tried a small piece of wire, I think you could make that work as well, it's would have to be stainless anything else will just "burn" through and break.

I'm interested in here what anyone else finds out.

Curt

#46 E St. Kruiser50

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 07:45 AM

DYMO-TAPE AND A # 11 BLADE WORKS BEST FOR ME.

I BUY THE BLACK IN ROLLS OF THREE AT OFFICE MAX.

Either for pre-scribed lines to open doors. or to just scribe a new line for doors trunks, etc
You can even do rounded corners as the TRIMMED DYMO-TAPE acts as a guide.
I use it two layers thick, to ensure no "SLIPPAGE" :D .
HAS A GREAT STICKY BACKING.

SIMPLE, AND ALWAYS WORKS.

#47 Foxer

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 10:54 AM

Ok I just tried it out.

I used a Chevell 454 body from Revell.

I attached the body to the bench on it's side using a spring clamp.
Then I attached a few elastic bands to the skirt on the table with a c-clamp.
Next I attached the thread to the elastic.
This worked out pretty will and gave me a fee hand to steady the body, and the elastic worked as the "return" mechanisim for the thread.

In that short time I was able to complete one side of the door, pretty good for time. On the down side it does heat the plastic up to the point it gets "pulled" through on the panel and the door leaving a surface that needs to be sanded and finished. I also found it to be a worry not to burn outside the panel line.

All in all I think it would worked pretty good, I'd give it a 3.5 out of 5 ofr a rating, but who the H E double hockey sticks am I anyway.

I also tried a small piece of wire, I think you could make that work as well, it's would have to be stainless anything else will just "burn" through and break.

I'm interested in here what anyone else finds out.

Curt



Cool Curt .. I'm surprised you can actually get the thread going enough to heat the plastic that much.

#48 Rider

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 03:03 PM

Cool Curt .. I'm surprised you can actually get the thread going enough to heat the plastic that much.



Yeah I was surprised too, this marine thread it pretty tough. At this point in time I can say I won't be using this method. I've used Treehuger Dave method to scribe panel lines on the blank/virgin body of my Honda RA272 build. For opening doors and panels another alternative which I also used on the Honda; was to use the scriber you can get for cutting sheet plastic. You can get them at Home Depot for a couple $. I like those the best, they're hardened and the actual scriber piece is flat, I guess like really steed chisel.

#49 MrObsessive

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 03:35 PM

I know what the problem was with Bill, he needs smaller knees!!!!
love yah!!


:lol: :huh: :lol: :lol:

#50 Lownslow

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 04:47 PM

ive tried the thread before, but im more versatile than most i used my toes to hold the body. but its not very accurate its easier with a reversed 11

#51 Guest_JamesDE_*

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Posted 05 October 2009 - 06:25 AM

Ive tried the thread before as well. It worked well for me. But I prefer using a #11 blade.

#52 sfhess

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Posted 05 October 2009 - 08:45 AM

Best way to hold the thread is to use a Flex-I-File u-shaped handle. Thin carpet thread is best to use, regular sewing thread stretches and breaks too easily.

I have used this method for a couple of small projects and a friend has used it to cutout doors etc with good results.

Posted Image

#53 philo426

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 08:33 AM

I don't think tread would make for a precise cut out.I prefer to score it with the back edge of an Exacto blade until the door serarates from the body. Posted Image

#54 Pete J.

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 05:13 PM

I tried thread before and just never had any success. Many years ago, I was in Japan and ran into Hasagawa/Tritool photo etched saws and fell in love with them. You can literally cut a door out and re-glue it, the kerf is so small. In the right hands they can be very accurate a pleasure to use. They come in a variety of sizes and shapes so you can get in many places that other methods just won't get to. Mine have lasted at least 10 years, so I can recommend them very highly. Here is the link to HLJ but you can get them in other places as well. Any hobby shop that is well stocked should carry them. http://www.hlj.com/product/HSGTP-4

#55 4DCustoms

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 05:15 PM

DYMO-TAPE AND A # 11 BLADE WORKS BEST FOR ME.

I BUY THE BLACK IN ROLLS OF THREE AT OFFICE MAX.

Either for pre-scribed lines to open doors. or to just scribe a new line for doors trunks, etc
You can even do rounded corners as the TRIMMED DYMO-TAPE acts as a guide.
I use it two layers thick, to ensure no "SLIPPAGE" :D .
HAS A GREAT STICKY BACKING.

SIMPLE, AND ALWAYS WORKS.


Dymo-Tape, how do you use it and where do you get it?

#56 jasoncamaro

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 07:52 PM

I found using a mechanics O Ring puller the best method as its sharp and easy to control if you are not sure what this is i can upload a pic
if ya want

#57 Foxer

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 02:10 AM

I found using a mechanics O Ring puller the best method as its sharp and easy to control if you are not sure what this is i can upload a pic
if ya want


I've never even HEARD of this tool. Would love to see more.

#58 Foxer

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 02:16 AM

This has been an interesting thread and I did eventually get somewhat of an idea how doors are cut with thread. As I continued going through old issues of MCM I came on one article where Gregg had photos of him thread-cutting a door. No Obsessive knees were harmed in the thread ... he had the body clamped to the desk! :lol:

#59 jasoncamaro

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 08:31 PM

I've never even HEARD of this tool. Would love to see more.


Heres a pic of the tools you guys probably have these just called a different name but us kiwis call them o-ring pullers

Attached File  SDC10363.JPG   77.27KB   41 downloads

#60 dwc43

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 09:33 PM

Heres a pic of the tools you guys probably have these just called a different name but us kiwis call them o-ring pullers

Attached File  SDC10363.JPG   77.27KB   41 downloads


Those are picks, or dentist picks if you like that name.