Jump to content


how should you spray testors spray enamel


  • You cannot reply to this topic
10 replies to this topic

#1 h3ae86

h3ae86

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 112 posts
  • Location:Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania
  • Full Name:Harold Guinter the 3rd

Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:17 PM

everytime it seems to bubble

#2 SuperStockAndy

SuperStockAndy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,438 posts
  • Location:Indiana
  • Full Name:Andy "Android" Conn

Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:22 PM

The best way to spray it is in the trash. Do yourself a favor and get Model Master or Tamiya lacquers...more expensive but you will thank yourself.

#3 martinfan5

martinfan5

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,101 posts
  • Location:Phoenix Az
  • Full Name:Jonathan Stephens

Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:27 PM

I was going to say something like that, testor enamel spray can be a big pain to work with, you really are better with using Model Master Lacquer spary, its about the same price , but so much better, I like model master spary better then I do tamyia paint.

#4 62rebel

62rebel

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,382 posts
  • Location:CHARLESTON SC

Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:31 PM

Harold, the trick to Testors is warming the can and light coats from 8-10" inches away. too close and the propellant can't escape the paint, causing the gas to bubble out on the model. too heavy is the same result. enamel also takes longer to gas out, or "dry", so don't expect to be able to handle the model too soon after painting.

#5 whale392

whale392

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,264 posts
  • Location:Huber Heights, Oh
  • Full Name:Bradley Emery

Posted 20 January 2012 - 04:34 PM

I guess that is what separates builders from assemblers (not meant as a shot to you Jon or Harold). When shooting enamels straight from the can, get them quite warm and start with a very light mist coat. Wait a few minutes, and with a warm can, add another mist coat. Roughly 10 minutes, warm can again, lay out a slightly wetter coat for even coverage. Let it dry to the point of being tacky, and take the warm can and lay down one last color coat. Let that dry completely (usually takes about a week), then clear over it with your favorite clear.

#6 martinfan5

martinfan5

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,101 posts
  • Location:Phoenix Az
  • Full Name:Jonathan Stephens

Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:08 PM

Warming the can applys to all paint in a spray can, but testors enamels take a little bit of work to get a good finish . Just make sure you turn the can upside and clear the nozzle after each use, or you will get little globs of paint on the body the next time you use it. A sided from getting the can warm, shake the can to , I would keep the can in warm water for at least five minutes

#7 Modelmartin

Modelmartin

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,812 posts
  • Location:Minneapolis, MN
  • Full Name:Martin, Andrew O.

Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:23 PM

It only takes the price of 10-12 cans of paint to buy a half decent airbrush!!!

#8 sportandmiah

sportandmiah

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 557 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Full Name:Arnold Jackson

Posted 20 January 2012 - 07:20 PM

If you have a few.extra bucks, purchase a Paasche H airbrush. You can decant it, thin it, and spray with MUCH better results than using a rattle.can. In fact, you'll be.amazed at the results you can.get with an airbrush.

#9 Monty

Monty

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,543 posts
  • Location:Dallas Texas
  • Full Name:Monty

Posted 20 January 2012 - 07:44 PM

This was done by one of our members using only Testors black enamel sprayed from a rattle-can. http://www.modelcars...l=&fromsearch=1 No polishing kit, no clearcoat.

#10 whale392

whale392

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,264 posts
  • Location:Huber Heights, Oh
  • Full Name:Bradley Emery

Posted 21 January 2012 - 03:37 AM

That Vette is a great example of the double-edged sword that is enamel paints; Enamel paint takes forever to dry (bad to hurry-up modeling), but because it takes a while to dry it exhibits more self-leveling properties (Great for a smooth, shiny paint job). Enamels have their place, and I for one prefer enamels on Die-Casts (Hot Wheels) as I can shoot the body, let it sit for a moment to get its' 'tooth', then stuff it in the incubator at 200* and let it bake all night. I have had amazingly shiny and smooth paint-jobs come out of this method.


I will have to agree on an airbrush being the way to go as far as any paint (same with heating the can if you must shoot a can-job). Look at what can be accomplished with enamels and one (Donn Yost quickly comes to mind, but there are others and those who came before Donn who got super results with enamels and an airbrush).

#11 62rebel

62rebel

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,382 posts
  • Location:CHARLESTON SC

Posted 21 January 2012 - 06:43 AM

"wow; the instructions are right on the side of the can: shake well for 1 minute (use a timer, that's actually quite a long time) and not only will the paint get thoroughly mixed, it ought to be at LEAST body temperature by then. it's really not that hard to do."

It is kind of hard for some people. That why there are countless threads of people complaining about Testors canned paint. Just.because someone can rhad doesn't mean they will get good.results.

"buying an airbrush then requires that you either buy cans of air or a compressor, and then paint and thinner..... nice to have, but a luxury in my opinion. it also nearly demands that you have a paint booth...."

Maybe a luxury to some, but $100 will get you super results almost every time with an airbrush, whereas canned results vary greatly. Some people live in warm climates and can paint outside without a booth.