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lowering issues


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#1 Glen

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 06:17 PM

I need some help or pointers to lower my rides properly. If some one could help me that would be super. I have done some questionable jobs but would like to do it right so I can show them. Thanks for your help

#2 Billy Kingsley

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 06:29 PM

The easist thing for me is to flip the front spindles. That works good for some kits and not so good for others.

In the back, you can make lowering blocks by adding styrene to the mounting point of the axle...hard to explain, and I didn't fully understand it until I did my Galaxie Limited Sedan Delivery Basically, it shifts the axle up.

On kits where the axles mount on the springs, simply remove a coil.

Anything more complicated is beyond what I've done so far!

#3 Schumacher330

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 09:40 PM

Best way I've been able to lower stuff is to cut the tab off of the spindle and go higher on the spindle, or make a new one out of brass tubing or such. For the back end, leaf springs under the axle are easiest, just do as Billy said and make a lowering block. For spring over, make a cheapy spring under kit by putting the springs under the axle. Usually you'll have to make new springs out of styrene strip or brass strip. It isn't to bad. I've lowered a few mini trucks in real life, so if you have any questions few free to PM me.

#4 Zoom Zoom

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 12:56 AM

If you want ultimate accuracy, you have to reposition the axle and spindle centerlines to center the wheel where it looks best. While the suggestions above work well with the overall height, they don't take into account the possibility the wheel itself might need to move forwards or backwards, which might require more surgery. Basically you have to break down the parts and reassemble them, and have brass or styrene strips and rods and sometimes tubes to use to reassemble the pieces so they all line up. You have to work like a mechanic in miniature, and it's not hard to cut/glue plastic, but it is difficult to get all four corners to sit level.

Now, for a much simpler approach if you're not entering the model into a contest, and if curbside building is okay with you. I like to attach the brake rotors to the wheel/tire assembly first. Then I set the car "on blocks" to the desired ride height, and slip the wheel assemblies underneath to see where they set. I usually use business cards to hold the body in place on the workbench. Once I'm happy with the ride height I determine if any material needs to be removed (usually snipping off a spindle or axle end) or added (making a shim from styrene strip or tube) between the wheel and suspension. I'll add the shim to the wheel/brake assembly. Then when these are test fit, I'll make the locations permanent by gluing the wheel/tire/brake assemblies to the suspension. I sometimes use superglue, or use Epoxy if ultimate strenght is needed.

This has worked very well for me to get the ride height either correct or lower on my models. Most kits seem to build up out of the box with a ride height that is too high.

#5 Glen

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 07:10 AM

Thanx guys but I have one more question about the kits that have the leave sprins attached to the rear axle and that is do you seperate the axle or just chop the leaf down a bit?

#6 Ken

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 03:37 PM

If you are very carefull, you can separate the leaf spring from the axle after several passes with the backside of a #11 exacto blade. You could scratch some new springs from sheet styrene as well.