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Choosing Primer


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#1 vintagestang

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 03:35 AM

Most people say that one color primer is the best but the peron that made the most sense to me said use ruddy brown with reds, white or light gray with light colors, and dark gray with dark colors.

#2 Casey

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 09:57 AM

Most people say that one color primer is the best but the peron that made the most sense to me said use ruddy brown with reds, white or light gray with light colors, and dark gray with dark colors.


It will depend upon how you want the final color to look, but in general, matching the primer or base color to the top coat works best IMHO. Yellows, whites, and red should use a white base, and dark colors (black, nay blue) should use either a dark grey or black base. These are all assuming you're using solid colors, not candies, pearls, etc.

Here's some good info: http://www.tamiyausa...p?article-id=35

#3 vintagestang

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 04:30 PM

Reds should use ruddy brown.

#4 hooterville75

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 03:54 PM

Casey, that was very valuable information. Thanks, and much appreciated.

#5 Longbox55

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:18 PM

White primer will make red "pop" much better than ruddy brown.

#6 426hemiman

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:44 PM

if you use a yellow tinted primer on red it will really pop!

#7 southpier

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:06 AM

on a relative note, how long should the wait be between primer and paint? i've heard everything from 24 hours to 30 days. i don't build so fast it matters, but once in a while i get some blocks of time where this information would be helpful.

thanks

#8 Longbox55

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:29 AM

if you use a yellow tinted primer on red it will really pop!

I'll remember that next time I do one in red, as I do have a can of yellow primer in my paint stash.

Edited by Longbox55, 02 October 2012 - 05:29 AM.


#9 Guest_G Holding_*

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:21 AM

It will depend upon how you want the final color to look, but in general, matching the primer or base color to the top coat works best IMHO. Yellows, whites, and red should use a white base, and dark colors (black, nay blue) should use either a dark grey or black base. These are all assuming you're using solid colors, not candies, pearls, etc.

Here's some good info: http://www.tamiyausa...p?article-id=35


Yep...tint the primer

#10 gluebomb

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:33 AM

on a relative note, how long should the wait be between primer and paint? i've heard everything from 24 hours to 30 days. i don't build so fast it matters, but once in a while i get some blocks of time where this information would be helpful.

thanks

I smell the painted object, if it doesn't smell like paint your good to go. I have never had a problem with this method if you are wondering.

#11 Chas SCR

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 03:55 PM

  • White primer will make red "pop" much better than ruddy brown.
Primer has little to do with this as use what is also called a sealer coat. This can be Black,Yellow,White are the three main ones as Black helps darken a Hue number as White helps brighten a hue number. But for red to pop Yellow under a red will make the Hue number jump higher then any other color number on the chart. This number that i'm talking about is called a Hue number in the color spectrum. You really like to make a red get brighter then any thing you seen and I'm talking about a normal red for testing use a yellow under it and see you like that.

#12 426hemiman

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:09 PM

Chas - You're so right. Mike Alexander told me how to make red paint pop. He said yellow primer is the best. I miss talking to him about paint.

#13 Chas SCR

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:56 PM

I also guess I should explain that there is 3 3 digit numbers that are in each color as it compare to the hue number. They are normaly broken down as a High .000 number and mid .000 number and low .000 number. When you mix paint to make a color say we take the 1950 Plymouth black. This Black is the only true black paint ever to have the middle number at .000 on the hue chart. This means it takes this one color a .100 High and another color .100 mix the two to get a .000 in the middle to make the most perfict black. Now if you mix it a little off the number will drop down say a little more of the high color. .100 Mid will change say .005 and the low number will go down to a .095 and this will give it a diffrent hue look under the light. Now not much can be seen with the naked eye on this issue with some colors but when you put another color on it. You can great'ly change the mid and low number and move it all to the high end and make stuff pop harder or brighter.

#14 southpier

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:45 PM

yeah; i was going to say that ...

#15 CHEVY2MUCH

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 01:42 PM

why does my primer and final color have a grainy or orange peel look to it i sand the primer coat with 880 than 1000 then put final color on and it looks grainy/orange peel.ive tried spray cans / air brush on final color still same effects. what am i doing wrong in the past never had this problem before pleease help on verge of giving up on modeling.

#16 CadillacPat

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 02:20 PM

Could be anything you might be doing.

Maybe a real detailed accounting of your procedure???

CadillacPat

#17 935k3

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 04:02 PM

why does my primer and final color have a grainy or orange peel look to it i sand the primer coat with 880 than 1000 then put final color on and it looks grainy/orange peel.ive tried spray cans / air brush on final color still same effects. what am i doing wrong in the past never had this problem before pleease help on verge of giving up on modeling.

You are not doing anything wrong. The problem is primers ar very porous and tend to soak up the first layers of the color coat. I always consider the first few coats to be nothing but a sealer coat. I let it dry and sand down then apply the final coats. It always comes out better the second time.

Edited by 935k3, 24 October 2012 - 04:03 PM.


#18 Chas SCR

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 04:48 PM

@ Chevy2Much You ever think of not starting with 800 grit sand paper? That could be your reason as it does not need to be sanded down with that. 1500 to start will do just good and if you need a little more extra add water and this helps also.

#19 Mr Dedo

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 12:22 PM

white makes yellow pop

get a color wheel and practice mixing

try your junior college for a color, light and pigment class

#20 mnwildpunk

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 07:05 PM

I'm looking at shooting testors laquer emerald green on a couple different bodys. I'm wondering what color primer should I put down? On the lamborghini I just painted flamming orange , I used gray but when I went to shoot the underside of the engine cover I didn't primer and in hindsight I should have primered the whole car in white. Should I use white for the green? I thought I read somewhere to use silver for metallics is that true?