Jump to content


How to photograph a model?


  • You cannot reply to this topic
14 replies to this topic

#1 meaneyme

meaneyme

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 308 posts
  • Location:Panama City, Florida

Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:01 AM

Hey guys, I am interested in taking a few pictures of my models. I just built a small light booth so I have the lighting I need, my question for you camera gurus is more what settings should I use in my camera? What Fstop settings should I use? Aperture? Speed? Please help. I have a point and shoot type digital camera but I am able to manually change a few settings if need be, I just need to know which of those settings are the best to use.

#2 Big Daddy

Big Daddy

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 477 posts
  • Location:Guelph Ontario Canada
  • Full Name:daryl turner

Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:07 AM

I have a sony 580 and i always shot in aperture mode with the highest Fstop indoors,and manual focus, outside on a bright day you won't need such a high Fstop

#3 Darin Bastedo

Darin Bastedo

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,548 posts
  • Location:Kingsport TN

Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:15 AM

Drew Hierwarter just did an excellent article on this in the previous issue of Model Cars Magazine. If you ask me it's a must have for anyone entering an online photo contest or posting pictures online.

#4 Dr. Cranky

Dr. Cranky

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,391 posts
  • Location:Transylvania, Florida
  • Full Name:Virgil "Doctor Cranky" Suarez

Posted 10 February 2012 - 09:34 AM

It's a wonderful article indeed, Darin, thanks for remembering it.

There's also this quick how-to:

http://www.modelcart...-model-car.html

#5 MikeMc

MikeMc

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,577 posts

Posted 10 February 2012 - 06:11 PM

If you are old enough to use silver ..the "sunny 16" rule works....or set it to aperture priority@ f8 and focus carefully.

Edited by MikeMc, 10 February 2012 - 06:11 PM.


#6 Erik Smith

Erik Smith

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,799 posts
  • Location:Spokane, WA
  • Full Name:Erik Smith

Posted 10 February 2012 - 07:20 PM

This depends. You get a greater depth of field with a smaller aperature (larger number) but, and this is important, lenses differ drastically in how sharp they are at different aperature settings. So, setting your camera to the smallest aperature will give you the greatest DOF, but, overall, the picture won't be a sharp as, say, f11. The great thing about digital is, you can shoot tons of photos and compare which are the best. And usually the camera will record all pertinent information so you can replicate the results.

On my Canon SLR, I can shoot upto f22, but the pictures are sharper around f13. I shot the same photo at all the f stops, loaded them on the computer, zoomed in on a spot, and compared and that let me know where my lens was the sharpest.

#7 MikeMc

MikeMc

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,577 posts

Posted 11 February 2012 - 05:30 AM

This depends. You get a greater depth of field with a smaller aperture (larger number) but, and this is important, lenses differ drastically in how sharp they are at different aperture settings. So, setting your camera to the smallest aperture will give you the greatest DOF, but, overall, the picture won't be a sharp as, say, f11. The great thing about digital is, you can shoot tons of photos and compare which are the best. And usually the camera will record all pertinent information so you can replicate the results.

On my Canon SLR, I can shoot upto f22, but the pictures are sharper around f13. I shot the same photo at all the f stops, loaded them on the computer, zoomed in on a spot, and compared and that let me know where my lens was the sharpest.


Do not use any color to check sharpness or resolution..as light refraction can change your results due to lens coatings...use one of these...



Posted Image

Digital and Silver are totally different..read here

http://www.normankor...rials/MTF5.html



Unless you are shooting in JPEG mode....I shoot in RAW and sharpen before and after....A jpeg uses an algorithm to give your results..not what the lens sees.
After 20 plus years of fixing camera lenses...I can talk about resolution, refraction, and depth of field and depth of focus. I will put my 30 and 40 year old lenses from Leitz and Schneider up against any newer multi coated optics ....and the new ones will be sharper, but with less contrast. I love Photoshop..and it will solve most image issues.

Edited by MikeMc, 11 February 2012 - 05:39 AM.


#8 Erik Smith

Erik Smith

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,799 posts
  • Location:Spokane, WA
  • Full Name:Erik Smith

Posted 11 February 2012 - 06:41 AM

I guess the essence of my post was...with digital technology, take pictures at different settings and see which ones look the best. Don't lock into smallest aperture just because it offers greatest DOF. Also, what others do may not apply to your camera, so again, experiment. It costs nothing to shoot and compare.

#9 MikeMc

MikeMc

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,577 posts

Posted 11 February 2012 - 09:41 AM

I totally agree...I used to preach film is cheap.....but with digital keep shooting and then get it BIG and look!!

I have found that Canon does have some very well made cameras and uses some algorithms based on the EOS that are incredible !

I do also agree to play around with your camera and its modes...let it work for you...after all thats what DELETE is for!

#10 MonoPed

MonoPed

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,338 posts
  • Location:Hernando, FL

Posted 11 February 2012 - 07:16 PM

I posted this sometime back, hope it helps...

http://www.modelcars...showtopic=45767

Edited by MonoPed, 11 February 2012 - 07:17 PM.


#11 Gary66

Gary66

    MCM Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 83 posts
  • Location:Kannapolis,NC
  • Full Name:Gary Lyles

Posted 12 February 2012 - 06:57 AM

One of the best (if not the best) model photographers was the late Jerry Sims, known as Luke57 or Mitchum on many forums.
He always said get your stuff outside in the good old sunshine when taking pics, and that's what I do.

#12 Dr. Cranky

Dr. Cranky

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,391 posts
  • Location:Transylvania, Florida
  • Full Name:Virgil "Doctor Cranky" Suarez

Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:01 AM

Gary, I have to agree with you. Jerry not only took some amazing photographs, but he also had a great sense of humor and everything about his models and photos just rang of a great deal of FUN. He is sorely missed.

#13 MonoPed

MonoPed

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,338 posts
  • Location:Hernando, FL

Posted 12 February 2012 - 08:47 AM

There is something to be said for shooting in sunlight, this was shot on my asphalt driveway, with the camera mounted on a desktop tripod.

Posted Image

#14 Dr. Cranky

Dr. Cranky

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,391 posts
  • Location:Transylvania, Florida
  • Full Name:Virgil "Doctor Cranky" Suarez

Posted 12 February 2012 - 10:21 AM

Brian, that turned out to be a great picture of a beautiful model. And you are right, there's no way to go wrong out in the daylight.

#15 Tony T

Tony T

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,619 posts
  • Location:Greely ON Canada
  • Full Name:Tony

Posted 12 February 2012 - 10:27 AM

It was a Jerry Sims suggestion that I take my garage diorama outside. Here is one of the results of that exercise!
Posted Image