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#1 jerseyjunker1

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 12:53 AM

i saw this on jss and it blew my mind what some will do to make a buck.

http://blog.hemmings...the-real-thing/

#2 Dr. Cranky

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 02:21 AM

Just goes to show how far some people are willing to go.

#3 JamesW

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 03:06 AM

You can clone a car all you want, but when it comes to changing numbers, watch out. Can't believe he actually thought he could get away with it.

#4 Danno

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 05:58 AM

Happens all the time, usually on a smaller scale and with a less obvious "target" than a Z-16.

I've worked similar cases, and the cloner usually makes huge mistakes, just as the linked article highlights. There are other, even more sophisticated ways to spot cloned cars, old or new.

It is highly unusual for a cloner to argue so much and so publicly with real experts, however. That's what really tripped up this guy. The real experts do, indeed, know what they're talking about ... and the cloners seldom do. They make the superficial, cosmetic changes and hope to find a real idiot buyer.

It's surprising, however, that this guy was so stupid as to try to fake VIN and trim plates by stamping them instead of properly embossing/debossing them. He made it easy to get himself caught ... like some kind of felony deathwish.

And one more point ~ the "I bought it that way" excuse is the most common; also usually and easily disproved.

Greed and larceny are the motivators, and they are job security for us auto theft investigators. Fortunately, this one was caught before some naive and innocent purchaser was taken to the cleaners by his dream car and the "deal too good to be true!"

B)

#5 jerseyjunker1

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 08:11 AM

Happens all the time, usually on a smaller scale and with a less obvious "target" than a Z-16.

I've worked similar cases, and the cloner usually makes huge mistakes, just as the linked article highlights. There are other, even more sophisticated ways to spot cloned cars, old or new.

It is highly unusual for a cloner to argue so much and so publicly with real experts, however. That's what really tripped up this guy. The real experts do, indeed, know what they're talking about ... and the cloners seldom do. They make the superficial, cosmetic changes and hope to find a real idiot buyer.

It's surprising, however, that this guy was so stupid as to try to fake VIN and trim plates by stamping them instead of properly embossing/debossing them. He made it easy to get himself caught ... like some kind of felony deathwish.

And one more point ~ the "I bought it that way" excuse is the most common; also usually and easily disproved.

Greed and larceny are the motivators, and they are job security for us auto theft investigators. Fortunately, this one was caught before some naive and innocent purchaser was taken to the cleaners by his dream car and the "deal too good to be true!"

B)

BOOK EM Danno :D

#6 JMD904

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 01:41 PM

No matter whatcha ya do, somebody is gonna notice a number ain't matching. I knew a guy who tried to clone a Cutlass into a 442. It was obvious!

#7 CorvairJim

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 08:20 AM

Personally I don't have a problem with taking a lower-line car and modifying it to appear to be something more valuable - IF YOU DON'T TRY TO PASS IT OFF AS THE REAL DEAL! Many of us would love to own an honest-to-goodness Z-16 or LS-6 Chevelle, '63 Z-06 Corvette, GTO Judge, Super Duty Trans Am, Boss 429 Mustang, etc, but how many of us can actually afford such a car? OK, even a nice example of the basic model of these cars is up in the 5-digit range, but you can generally add an extra "0" to the price for the authentic car. Build what you like, but be honest about it.

#8 Rick Schmidt

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 02:31 PM

I think it's real. Just like my genuine 1982 Cobra Mustang. Hehehehe
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#9 dieseldog1970

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 05:40 AM

Personally, I will leave the numbers matching cars to the collectors who have the bank account to purchase them, these cars are pushed in and out of enclosed trailers at car shows. My hats off to the people who have the time and money to restore them, this is done as a true labour of love!! I will find that low line car, build it the way I want, and PROUDLY claim that it is a clone....BUILT to be driven and enjoyed!!! Scumbags who try to pass of clones as originals, well.....I wish them nuthing but the worst!!!

#10 1930fordpickup

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 12:01 PM

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Looks like an officer was TEXTING again !! LOL