Jump to content


Making kit chrome look more realistic


  • You cannot reply to this topic
13 replies to this topic

#1 SuperStockAndy

SuperStockAndy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,438 posts
  • Location:Indiana
  • Full Name:Andy "Android" Conn

Posted 24 April 2012 - 10:17 AM

Ever notice how kit chrome looks a little too...toyish? I've got news for you B)

All I do is take some acrylic black paint, and pretty much soak all the chrome in it. Then once it dries, I wipe the black paint off.


Here's the difference:
Posted Image

(One on the left is stock chrome, one on the right is after the black wash)

It really tones down the chrome and makes it look more realistic. But, unfortunately, I haven't figured out how to get rid of the sprue attachment points :( :P

#2 SuperStockAndy

SuperStockAndy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,438 posts
  • Location:Indiana
  • Full Name:Andy "Android" Conn

Posted 24 April 2012 - 10:43 AM

Easy, you sand it.


And sand the chrome off along with it? :huh:

#3 cobraman

cobraman

    Crazy 'bout Cobras!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,515 posts
  • Location:Arizona
  • Full Name:Ray Kurn

Posted 26 April 2012 - 10:29 AM

You can get the same effect with just a black wash or using the product called " The Detailer ".

#4 Mike Kucaba

Mike Kucaba

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,124 posts
  • Location:Mesa,AZ
  • Full Name:Michael J Kucaba

Posted 26 April 2012 - 09:20 PM

I see the rims of a lot of models "chipped" at the sprue point and the best method to me is to use a nail clipper. I got the toenail clipper with the magnifier and light at Big Lots for $2 and it cuts great,and is curved to boot. For chrome I use Tamiya acrylic "smoke".

#5 Jeff B

Jeff B

    MCM Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 88 posts
  • Location:Copley,OH
  • Full Name:Jeff Blomqvist

Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:08 AM

A lot of people including me use a silver Sharpie to touch up the sanded down sprue points.
Posted Image

#6 Jon Cole

Jon Cole

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,426 posts
  • Location:NH, USA
  • Full Name:Jon... although my parents used to call me "KNOCK IT OFF!"

Posted 01 May 2012 - 03:56 AM

You can get the same effect with just a black wash or using the product called " The Detailer ".


I have used the black "Detailer" product, and I notice two probs w/ it... First, it seems to dry with a blue tint, and second, it will peel right off when dry.
I am wondering if anyone else has noticed this, or does this only happen in my alternate universe?

EDIT: oh, btw, I like that "soaked" wheel!

Edited by Jon Cole, 01 May 2012 - 03:57 AM.


#7 Jon Cole

Jon Cole

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,426 posts
  • Location:NH, USA
  • Full Name:Jon... although my parents used to call me "KNOCK IT OFF!"

Posted 01 May 2012 - 04:01 AM

A lot of people including me use a silver Sharpie to touch up the sanded down sprue points.
Posted Image


The Sharpie is better than nothing, but the color is more aluminum than chrome. I wonder if we treated it like Alclad, and preceded it with a black Sharpie, if that would make a diff? Hmmm? I will have to try that.

#8 Deathgoblin

Deathgoblin

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 984 posts
  • Location:Columbus, OH
  • Full Name:Brian Wilson

Posted 01 May 2012 - 04:52 AM

I've been using BMF when possible. The sharpie doesn't do it for me.

#9 Badluck 13

Badluck 13

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 918 posts
  • Location:Akron,Ohio
  • Full Name:Mike Stiles

Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:36 AM

I have used the black "Detailer" product, and I notice two probs w/ it... First, it seems to dry with a blue tint, and second, it will peel right off when dry.
I am wondering if anyone else has noticed this, or does this only happen in my alternate universe?

EDIT: oh, btw, I like that "soaked" wheel!

I haven't had the peeling problem,but yes on the blue tint,I thought maybe I just bought a bad bottle :huh:

#10 Jon Cole

Jon Cole

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,426 posts
  • Location:NH, USA
  • Full Name:Jon... although my parents used to call me "KNOCK IT OFF!"

Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:57 AM

I haven't had the peeling problem,but yes on the blue tint,I thought maybe I just bought a bad bottle :huh:


Yeah, I won't use The Detailer to black out grilles anymore, too much blue hue. Use flat black acrylic such as Tamiya bottle paint, and wipe off the raised parts. If you do that with enamel bottle paint, the chemical effect will, after a few wipes, take the chrome plate off. Been there, done that. <_<

#11 Ddms

Ddms

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Pasadena, CA
  • Full Name:Tom Kelly

Posted 01 May 2012 - 02:07 PM

I've gotten lots of advice from really good modelers about how to use BMF and stick-on chrome, but mine always turns out uneven and sort of lumpy. I can't seem to master Alclad either. I just started a Moebius Hudson, and tried mixing a little black acrylic ink (from an art store) with Future Premium Floor Finish and spraying the kit chrome with it. (Future is an acrylic.With the ink mixed in, it's sort of like Tamiya Smoke, except thinner and a lot cheaper.) It knocks down the toyish brightness, but keeps the gloss and smoothness. It also seems to add depth and brings out the detail.

The first time I tried it I added too much ink to the Future and it looked too dark in the crevices, so I used a toothbrush to clean it off with household ammonia. The ammonia didn't hurt the chorme a bit.

Edited by Ddms, 01 May 2012 - 02:14 PM.


#12 Aaronw

Aaronw

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,583 posts
  • Location:North Coast of California
  • Full Name:Aaron

Posted 02 May 2012 - 02:40 PM

If you put down a coat of Future then thinner based paints should be ok. I use artists oils and Mona Lisa thinner to black out grills, he oils give a good solid black and have a long working time. Without the coat of Future I have had the chrome just wipe off like Jon said. I specifically use the Mona Lisa brand thinner because it is supposed to be very mild as thinners go so less likely to react with underlying paints, chrome etc.

Posted Image

#13 Ddms

Ddms

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Pasadena, CA
  • Full Name:Tom Kelly

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:23 AM

One more thing: If you use the Future method, you don't need to wipe it off after dipping or spraying. When it dries, it leaves a very thin coating that's not the least bit visible. The acrylic ink I used is COM-ART transparent smoke. Only a few drops are needed to darken a good quantity of Future, so it should last for years. Actually, any water-soluble ink ought to work.

Okay, yet another thing. Mixing ink with Future has some interesting possibilities. With Tamiya clear and other transparent acrylics being so expensive, it might be worthwhile to experiment. But if something doesn't work out, a toothbrush soaked with household ammonia will remove it without damage, at least to styrene.

#14 Ddms

Ddms

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Pasadena, CA
  • Full Name:Tom Kelly

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:30 AM

Nice job, Aaron. Great subject! I've always loved those old Ford pickups.

On the subject of blacks, I've tried quite a few, and some blacks aren't all that black. I've settled on Rustoleum "Flat Protective Enamel" in a spray can. It's very flat and very black, much darker than Tamiya and some of the other rattle can blacks.