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Is Model building going to die off after our Generation goes?


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#261 Rob Hall

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 06:40 PM

One might argue the hobby is surviving because of the over 55 crowd.

Yeah, but eventually they will need new blood.

#262 martinfan5

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 07:51 PM

One might argue the hobby is surviving because of the over 55 crowd.

Yeah, but eventually they will need new blood.


I agree, the AARP crowd is keeping the hobby going for the most part, Rob, I tired saying that some day soon , the model companys are going to have to start thinking about kitting newer subjects, but my face just turn blue , because it seems that the automotive world stopped when the 60's ended.

Oh well, I will continue to give most of my hobby model to the Japaneses companys intell that day comes.

#263 Adhsdad

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 12:41 AM

I agree, the AARP crowd is keeping the hobby going for the most part, Rob, I tired saying that some day soon , the model companys are going to have to start thinking about kitting newer subjects, but my face just turn blue , because it seems that the automotive world stopped when the 60's ended.

Oh well, I will continue to give most of my hobby model to the Japaneses companys intell that day comes.


Hello everyone,

This is my first post on this site but I'm posting to a subject that has become near and dear to me. Yes, the AARP crowd is supporting the hobby but eventually they will be heading for the " Big Hobby Shop in the Sky". Who replaces them? The younger crowd. But kits that are "sorely needed" (50-60 year old subject matter) by the AARP crowd won't cut muster with the younger set. Ask yourself this question: What kits in the near future (5 yrs) will the now 15-20 year olds are going to want to be building? I don't have a crystal ball but I'm pretty darn sure they're NOT going to want build what I call "vintage iron". Yeah, there may be an exception or 2 to that statment but seriously, how many 16-17 yr olds are going to want to build a model of something that was manufactured 30-35 years before they were born? I'm not saying to never release anymore "vintage iron" but we as a hobby need to think toward the future. AND these companies can't keep reissuing the same OLD stuff over and over again and expect to recruit new blood to the hobby. Aside from the near fanatical attention (and money) the younger set gives to video games I just don't think we can keep continuing this trend of ignoring a segment of the hobby that could be a future for the hobby. I, myself, am closer to 50 than 20 but as of now, I don't even look at domestic companies' new releases anymore with the anticipation that there will be something that will be out there to look forward to. Why? Because of all the reissues that have been reissued for the umpteenth time! Now you may ask "what would you have them release"? Well, licensing issues aside, NASCAR. I know that some of us don't like NASCAR but this isn't being aimed at you. It's what would appeal to the younger set. Also, NHRA. Again, some of us may not like the 300 mph billboards but it's not aimed at you. Besides aren't there enough "vintage iron" releases these days to make at least some of us happy? I'd hate to sound like chicken litte but I believe the botton could fall out of this portion of the hobby if the trend continues. I could be wrong but I just believe that in the long run, this sort of "AARP" thinking won't be beneficial for the hobby.

Earl P

#264 nboldman

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 04:21 AM

What I see trend the most is guys build the era of cars they grew up in. Now I'm am exception to this being at 16 as I build any era of car to my liking. The foose kits for example will be perfect for me and it may be one id build box stock with just a few add ons. This reason being is because I like taking the older style of cars and adding modern touches to it.

I also enjoy hearing the storys of the so called "AARP" crowd because it gives me inspiration on what to build next. Such as hearing storys of my grandfather's old 1932 ford jalopy race car. Which I am currenrly trying to replicate.

Everyone is goimg to have there own opinions and I think revell could and should add some new releases of more modern cars to their "to do" list.

#265 Scott - Elm City Hobbies

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 06:20 AM

As far as Nascar and NHRA cars, I have no doubt that companies would sell oodles of them, however the licensing that the racing bodies want to replicate their cars is just too much. Revell got out of Nascar long ago, and the only ones that Round 2 are producing are simple snap cars...and oh btw, you have to like building a Chevy, because that is all they do. And the Snap Round 2 cars are around the $30 mark, for a snap kit. Even the re-issued Hendrick cars from before the COT era that they said they were going to re-release, are going to fetch north of $30, which I have a feeling is why they haven't seen the light of day yet, because they likely aren't going to sell many. And it is all down to the cost of licensing.

With the cars that Round 2 have out, they are getting hit double for licensing, because NASCAR is taking a cut, as well Hendrick Motorsports are getting a cut.

I would love to see some new Nascar kits out to reflect the changes, but I am not going to give them $30+ for them.

#266 62rebel

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 10:43 AM

licensing fees are one problem; constant detail changes from year to year are another. how many kits would we have available to us IF each and every annual were engineered separately from it's previous issue, and the owners of that design were not charging a fee for every unit sold? how many designs started off magnificently and devolved into something less over the years, yet the original tool had been recut so many times as to render an original version impossible?
NASCAR and other forms of racing are extremely difficult to continuously kit new versions for, as those cars are constantly changing.
just duplicating any given car from a specific RACE DAY might involve serious effort beyond assembling a kit from a box.
the revenue generated by "collectible" items is now being drawn from the builders in this hobby, and it's tough to argue with the copyright owners over the difference between "hobby kits" and "junk from vendor tents at the races" in my book. they just want to see a paycheck for their logo/icon being used.
i won't buy slogan t-shirts; bumper stickers; hats, or anything to wear that has a brand logo because i will NOT pay to advertise for someone else's product.

#267 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 12:02 PM

I haven't read this entire thread, and someone may have already brought this up. Technology MAY bring a new "golden age" for modeling in the near futire. The cost of 3D printing is plummeting as the tech matures, and it's now possible to get a desktop 3D printer for $200 a month or less. Google sketchup is almost free-CAD, and has an extension to convert files created in it to a format that will run 3D printing apps. There is a guy in my local club who is actually making use of this capability and producing some parts that were previously only available if one was a very accomplished scratchbuilder.

What this means for any of us who choose to learn a few new skills is that ANY model can be produced with NO TOOLING WHATSOEVER. If you want a Borgward, go measure one carefully, or find blueprints, draw it up in sketchup, and have it 3D printed in wharever scale you want. You can do this today, right now. The cost will continue to come down, and while not acessible to modelers of all income levels, a lot of current stuff isn't either.

#268 62rebel

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 12:21 PM

that is one avenue that has definite promise, but i foresee having to pay a subscription fee to be able to access the necessary data WHEN the ability to do this actually becomes practical and viable for the mainstream hobbyist. or, worse, being unable to share pics of them because the copyright owner controlling the images exclusively. in other words, the ability to do as we wish will depend on our ability to pay for the privilege of using their "images"..... there are people whose only job is to ensure that somebody PAYS their employer for their property, real or conceptual.

#269 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 12:28 PM

62 rebel, that's an excellent point. However, my understanding of copyright law MIGHT make it entirely possible for a modeler to copy an existing design "for his own enjoyment", rather like CDs and DVDs can be exhibited in a home environment, where there isn't any copying with intent to profit. I mean, you can scratchbuild anything, and the copyright police don't come knocking.

#270 sjordan2

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 01:08 PM

Going back about ten pages or more, maybe model CAR building might dwindle down since there are so few recent 1/1 cars to ignite interest or passion (or invite anyone to actually open the hood), but the military, aircraft and miscellaneous guys will definitely go on.

#271 old-hermit

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 01:50 PM

The biggest problem the car modeling hobby has right now is kids grow up on electronics and don't want to invest the time, money or anything else involved with manually doing anything. I've been a gear head all my life, have a shop, tools, multiple cars & trucks but both my sons were raised in the electronic age and neither showed any interest in working on real cars or models.

#272 Art Anderson

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 01:54 PM

Hello everyone,

This is my first post on this site but I'm posting to a subject that has become near and dear to me. Yes, the AARP crowd is supporting the hobby but eventually they will be heading for the " Big Hobby Shop in the Sky". Who replaces them? The younger crowd. But kits that are "sorely needed" (50-60 year old subject matter) by the AARP crowd won't cut muster with the younger set. Ask yourself this question: What kits in the near future (5 yrs) will the now 15-20 year olds are going to want to be building? I don't have a crystal ball but I'm pretty darn sure they're NOT going to want build what I call "vintage iron". Yeah, there may be an exception or 2 to that statment but seriously, how many 16-17 yr olds are going to want to build a model of something that was manufactured 30-35 years before they were born? I'm not saying to never release anymore "vintage iron" but we as a hobby need to think toward the future. AND these companies can't keep reissuing the same OLD stuff over and over again and expect to recruit new blood to the hobby. Aside from the near fanatical attention (and money) the younger set gives to video games I just don't think we can keep continuing this trend of ignoring a segment of the hobby that could be a future for the hobby. I, myself, am closer to 50 than 20 but as of now, I don't even look at domestic companies' new releases anymore with the anticipation that there will be something that will be out there to look forward to. Why? Because of all the reissues that have been reissued for the umpteenth time! Now you may ask "what would you have them release"? Well, licensing issues aside, NASCAR. I know that some of us don't like NASCAR but this isn't being aimed at you. It's what would appeal to the younger set. Also, NHRA. Again, some of us may not like the 300 mph billboards but it's not aimed at you. Besides aren't there enough "vintage iron" releases these days to make at least some of us happy? I'd hate to sound like chicken litte but I believe the botton could fall out of this portion of the hobby if the trend continues. I could be wrong but I just believe that in the long run, this sort of "AARP" thinking won't be beneficial for the hobby.

Earl P


Earl, well said. Let me add something here: Just as an example, 50 yrs ago, when I was a newly minted high school graduate and college freshman, on the threshold of being 18, the '32 Ford was a 20yr old car. As such, people were already starting to ask "How long are rodders going to want to build Deuce roadsters? Well, fast forward to 2012, the Deuce is now an 80yr old car, and it can arguably be said that there are, in all forms (gennie restorations, original steel-bodied rods, reproduction fiberglass copies, even reproduction steel bodied Deuce roadsters) MORE Deuce roadsters on the streets today than Ford ever built! Now, given that it's fairly true that "art mirrors life", don't we still see modelers doing Deuces? Yes, we sure do. And while the big boom in this hobby happened just as "baby boomers" hit their early teens about 1959 or so, there is already a solidly placed second generation out here today--kids of the boomers, and guess what, a great many of those guys (and some gals who are modelers) have been building a third generation.

Even in the late 50's, not every kid built model cars, although it sure seems as though they did. An awful lot of kids back then at least tried, but only a portion of them stayed with it. And that can be said of each generation or so that has come along since. I'm less than a week from being certified as a 68 yr old, and while I have no kids, technically, I could have easily become a grandfather to near teenagers today--chances are that had I a son, he'd have at least given a model kit a shot, same with a grandchild, and even possibly a great grandchild. However, I think I'm smart enough to realize that just as not every kid in all my years on this planet built a model car, there's no reason to expect that succeeding generations would be any different.

As for reissue after reissue after reissue: Of course, in the end, it's pretty much always new product that drives sales, but even at that, reissues of subjects that still have some popularity can be just that extra bit of revenue that helps fund new tooling. Time was, with the exception of recognizable hot rodding subject matter, a model company could not hope to sell very many kits of cars that were more than 2-3 years old--that is how it was 50 years ago. However, as I mentioned above, there are a great many subjects today (a '32 Ford is but one example) that can be kitted, and sold, and sold in comfortably large numbers--and I somehow doubt that will go away any time soon. And given that our hobby is not one that is dependent on "Fortune 500" companies for model kits or supplies, the sheer number of model kit producers worldwide, along with those manufacturing everything else from paints to all the aftermarket stuff one can imagine--this hobby is going to continue for a few more decades at least--surely far after I've assumed room temperature.

But to get into "hand-wringing" over what will happen to our hobby when all us current members of it leave this earth--why bother? Go for the gold while we are still here, still able. If some of what we do sticks, so be it, if not, well....I think we all know the answer.

I don't think I've ever seen a crystal ball that gave perfect vision into the future, and to me that's OK.

Art

#273 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 02:29 PM

One thing I've been happy to see is a rekindling of interest in models in the 1:1 hot rod mags, and a good number of younger guys building traditional hot-rods in 1:1. Taking a young person for a ride in something fast and loud and somewhat scary can often open a door to experiencing life in the first person, as opposed to canned virtual "reality". The car model hobby has NEVER excited everyone, but it has the potential to last if WE get kids involved with making REAL things.

#274 Monte's Motors

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 05:26 PM

Bringing back some of the old kits is cool.

The question is,
What age group is buying them?

The model companys will cash in on the old timers social security and those kits will smoke up the sky on their cremation day.

Hopefully the old timers, took the time for their decindents.

I'll give plastic models 25 more years and the plastic will grow hard to metal and ready for shelves, without work. Hey, that's already showing up in the PLASTIC MAGAZINES today. hhhmmmm.

Edited by Monte's Motors, 07 July 2012 - 05:27 PM.


#275 old-hermit

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 04:22 AM

the plastic will grow hard to metal and ready for shelves, without work.

Can you say "diecast" ? heh heh heh

#276 mopar68

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 04:27 AM

Not if I have anything to do with it :D

#277 FLAWLESSVW

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 10:34 AM

Looks like Fat Brian and I are "around" the same age...

O.P., I am 36, I've had a desire to get into model building for probably 15-20 years. I would browse kits at random stores when I'd stumble across them and never saw that kit that just clicked with me, so I never took the plunge.

A couple months ago, I was at a very small hobby shop here in Ohio looking for parts for my 1/16 scale gas (nitro) RC Car. I saw two old ERTL kits (probably late 70's/ early 80's era) which were a tractor and trailer 1/25 scale big rig. I am a software developer for a company that designs software for the trucking industry, so these big rigs were right up my alley. The shop also had an old (same timeframe probably) Hasegawa T-38 fighter jet kit which I bought and built as my first ever build in my life (aside from snap-together pre-painted stuff when I was about 5!) to use as my "warm up / practice" for the big rig.

I am now completely bitten with the bug and can see this is something I'll be doing as long as I am able. I still consider myself part of the "younger generation" and hope this hobby continues for many years as well.

#278 CEKPETHO BCE

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 04:14 PM

I don't know. I have been into cars and models since very young age. Then in my teen years I was too busy with chasing girls and other stupidity like drinking. Got back into the hobby at 19 years old when I saw the model section at Michael's. All it took was to build one model and I was hooked and been going at it for the past 3 years. I feel like even if younger generation are not into models, they may get into it later on so model building isn't going to die out as long as there are models in stores like walmart that people can see.

#279 Nick Winter

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 04:23 PM

My opinion, As a under 18 modeller, (said that because that is how most shows/contests categorize us), I've been in this hobby for 8 years, My neighbor and one of my best friends caught the modelling bug from me and now models. As far as no people to take over the hobby as most of you have bleakly made the hobby's lively hood sound, every show I've been to they're is at least a dozen if not more people my age, who have entered they're models, and at least twice that many onlookers, who have just come to see the show and don't enter. Every time I'm in the local hobby shop there is younger people in it. On that note how many of you guys have kids that build? That's how I got into this hobby, my dad built up until my siblings were older.

As far as I'm concerned those "Tuner" kits, those "Donk" kits, all the stuff you guys criticize for being released, that's what draws the younger crowd, I know, I've spoken with the owner of the local hobby shop, he's said that when those kits first came out he noticed a lot of younger people buying them.

I've noticed that this topic comes up all the time, Are We INVISIBLE on this Forum, watch the Birthdays: See how many are under 20, under 30, even under 40.

Then tell me that the hobby will die off after your generation.

Nick Winter

#280 martinfan5

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 05:07 PM

See how many are under 20, under 30, even under 40.



Nick Winter


Not alot , the common age on here is 50+, and sad truth, thats the only age the American companys care about

Well I am pretty sure they are going to regret that when their bread and butter customers are no longer around, and whats left is my generation, the one before me,and the one Nick is in, or is nick in the one after that, hmmm

Anyways, they should be praying that we will still be wanting to buy their rehashed over 100 times reissues

I dont really think reissues of 57 chevys are going to be keeping them in the black in 20-30 years, but again, I what do I know, I am just guessing.

I really do hope that this hobby will not die off, and I dont think it will, it may change, but I dont think it will go away that quickly, but say it lasting another 50 years, I dont know,

Edited by martinfan5, 09 September 2012 - 05:09 PM.