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Folk art water based acrylics


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#1 Brendan30

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 03:40 PM

Has anyone shot folk art acrylics from Hobby Lobby through their airbrush and since they are water based what did anyone use to thin it? Thanks for the help I don't want to go fooling around with this if it doesn't work!

#2 Brendan30

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 03:49 PM

Ok, sounds good - can I thin it with rubbing alcohol? For the price of them I thought why not try it!

#3 Kmidd65

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 04:10 PM

I have had mixed results with rubbing alcohol. The metallic colors seem to clot up when mixed with 91%. I have used plain old "Blue" automotive windshield washer fluid with great success. To add a little more grip and durability, you could also mix in some Future Floor polish. Unfortunately, this is all trial and error with these paints. Most times, I end up using mine for detail painting, color washing parts, etc. HTH

Edited by Kmidd65, 12 May 2012 - 04:10 PM.


#4 Brendan30

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 02:10 AM

All great info guys, I can see using them as detail paints in the dark colors. i am going to try spraying them I will let you know how it works out!
Luckily I have an extra cab laying around.

#5 Dr. Cranky

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 02:21 AM

The best way to do it is to prepare a mixture of 25% distilled water and 75% airbrush medium (Liquitex) and then thin your paint with it. I always spray my acrylics and hit them with a few minutes of hair dryer time.

#6 Brendan30

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 02:31 AM

The best way to do it is to prepare a mixture of 25% distilled water and 75% airbrush medium (Liquitex) and then thin your paint with it. I always spray my acrylics and hit them with a few minutes of hair dryer time.


Thanks Cranky, where Can I get Liquitex? is it something have to buy online etc.. I guess the best way to do it would be to mix a large batch of it to have on hand on every use.

Thanks for the help.
Brendan

#7 Brendan30

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 02:34 AM

I have 4 new kits sitting that I purchased yesterday at the MAMA show in Maryland.. Which by the way was very nice. I saw a lot of different techniques for rusted rods that were amazing. One looked like the paint was swirled and textured on the model in rusted colors. I can't figure out how this was achieved.

#8 Dr. Cranky

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 02:36 AM

Brendan, you can find Liquitex airbrush medium at your local Hobby Lobby, art supply store or craft store. You should not have any trouble finding it, but if you do then turn to Amazon and you'll find it there. A bottle of the stuff will last you a lifetime.

#9 Agent G

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 06:45 AM

Windex and primer. I found it works well over a white primer. It's very touchy about surfaces so clean and primed is the key. Did I mention primer?

G

#10 Kmidd65

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 07:17 AM

Cranky, thanks for the tip on the hairdryer, I tried that on a spoon test and it really helps speed up the process! The cheap acrylic paints lay on in thin translucent coats so this definitely helps the process! I love the stuff I learn on this board!

#11 Aaronw

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 07:42 AM

I thin with water and about two drops of windex unless it's white or yellow. Then just straight water. Being water based it's always half dry before it hits the model so emmediate cleaning of the airbrush is recommended on small jobs. periodic cleaning on larger jobs. In other words, if you're painting a body clean the airbrush between coats with windex, water or mix of both.


You can add retarder to acrylics to extend the working time.

#12 Dr. Cranky

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 07:54 AM

Cranky, thanks for the tip on the hairdryer, I tried that on a spoon test and it really helps speed up the process! The cheap acrylic paints lay on in thin translucent coats so this definitely helps the process! I love the stuff I learn on this board!


Kirk, this is why I like using acrylics for my weathered and junky beauties . . . because I can build up layers. Of course I use mostly Vallejo Model Air and Medea Art acrylics (they have a rust colors kit) and I get good results.

#13 Chief Joseph

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 08:01 AM

You can add retarder to acrylics to extend the working time.

Yep, that's what the Liquitex Airbrush Medium that Dr Cranky mentioned is. It slows the drying enough to airbrush the acrylic paint and also helps with tip-dry. I painted a Klingon Cruiser a couple of years ago with craft paint thinned with water & Liquitex AB medium and it worked very well. The colors were perfect out of the bottle and as it's been said already, primer is a must. Just for fun, I recently painted a car body with some craft paint and then put clear lacquer over it and it worked as good as any other base coat.

#14 Brendan30

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 08:05 AM

Yep, that's what the Liquitex Airbrush Medium that Dr Cranky mentioned is. It slows the drying enough to airbrush the acrylic paint and also helps with tip-dry. I painted a Klingon Cruiser a couple of years ago with craft paint thinned with water & Liquitex AB medium and it worked very well. The colors were perfect out of the bottle and as it's been said already, primer is a must. Just for fun, I recently painted a car body with some craft paint and then put clear lacquer over it and it worked as good as any other base coat.


Do you have a pic of the model painted in the craft paint?

#15 Chief Joseph

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 09:29 AM

Do you have a pic of the model painted in the craft paint?

I don't have a pic of the car body that I painted (it was a test shot and had four different base paints all cleared over) but here is the Klingon ship:
Posted Image
Posted Image
Sorry for the large pics. The light green paint went on smoother than the gray paint, but after everything was covered in a gloss clear for decals and then semigloss clear, there was no difference.

I also have an old King Ghidorah monster kit that I painted with craft paint a long time ago. In that case the paint was thinned with windshield washer fluid and the result was good. The trick is not to put too much paint on at one time because it has a tendency to run. Build up the color with several light coats. Craft paint isn't very tough paint, either; don't handle it too much and get a clear over it as soon as possible.

Joseph

#16 Aaronw

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 09:39 AM

Yep, that's what the Liquitex Airbrush Medium that Dr Cranky mentioned is. It slows the drying enough to airbrush the acrylic paint and also helps with tip-dry. I painted a Klingon Cruiser a couple of years ago with craft paint thinned with water & Liquitex AB medium and it worked very well. The colors were perfect out of the bottle and as it's been said already, primer is a must. Just for fun, I recently painted a car body with some craft paint and then put clear lacquer over it and it worked as good as any other base coat.


I did not know the AB medium did that, I thought it was used to extend the volume of the paint making it easier to mix colors without thinning them out to much, kind of like adding linseed oil to artists oils. The stuff I have is made by Golden and just says retarder on the bottle. Good to know, I've seen the AB medium but never tried it.

#17 Marcus M. Jones

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 10:58 AM

i don't know about the folk art brand but some of these other paints you really need to read any warning labels they might have before spraying. i remember back in high school one brand of acrylic paint had a warning of 'will cause cancer if inhaled'

#18 Brendan30

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 03:04 PM

Great tips everyone, I think in this case with the folk art it may be better for those rusty crusty jobs