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New guy from Cleveland - Starting Int'l Transtar 4300 and Great Dane 40' Van


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#1 FLAWLESSVW

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 05:03 PM

Hi Guys. I'm new to the forums, and very new to model building. I've got an Ertl International Transtar 4300 and a Great Dane 40' Dry Goods Trailer as my first "major" modeling projects ever. I've only built 2 other models: a Minicraft Hasegawa T-38A Talon 1/72 scale (jet) and a Testors F4U-1 Corsair 1/72 (plane). Both were to get my feet wet in model building, and both came out pretty nice. I am nervous to start the big-rig as I know it is going to be a WAY bigger project than the two little planes I built and they're the only previous experience I have, but I've got a good eye for detail and this hobby is something I've wanted to start for many years (I'm 36 and am enjoying the "mental escape" model building provides).

I got the Transtar 4300 for $15 (can you believe that!) at a small hobby shop. It looks like it is from the late 70's / early 80's. The box had some water damage, but the contents are fine and even the decal sheet looks pretty good. The trailer was $30 and still in original cellophane which seemed like a good price as well.

I've read lots of the threads on here already and will continue to do so for more education.
ANY and ALL suggestions, tips and tricks are gladly welcome! Some of the 4300's on here look amazing, and I'm still debating on paint scheme ideas.

I'm thinking of starting with the trailer since it seems less complicated than the tractor...
Since I'm in the un-boxing stage, I need tips for early-on in the project. I'm going to begin prep sanding and was wondering if automotive grade scuff pads are acceptable for pre-paint preparation? (3M maroon pad) The trailer, for example, has tons of tiny bumps which are supposed to simulate the rivets on a real trailer, and I'm afraid even light sandpaper would remove them. I figure a scuff pad would be enough to prep?

I have a can of Testors Spray Enamel Semi Gloss Grey primer, and Testors Gloss White spray (for the trailer). I also picked up a can of Krylon Fusion gloss white which I am debating using instead of the Testors white (over the Testors Primer). Thoughts? I look forward to talking with you guys and learning!

Attached File  2002-12-08 12.00.00-131.jpg   99.02KB   9 downloads

#2 Ben

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 07:18 PM

Hi Guys. I'm new to the forums, and very new to model building. I've got an Ertl International Transtar 4300 and a Great Dane 40' Dry Goods Trailer as my first "major" modeling projects ever. I've only built 2 other models: a Minicraft Hasegawa T-38A Talon 1/72 scale (jet) and a Testors F4U-1 Corsair 1/72 (plane). Both were to get my feet wet in model building, and both came out pretty nice. I am nervous to start the big-rig as I know it is going to be a WAY bigger project than the two little planes I built and they're the only previous experience I have, but I've got a good eye for detail and this hobby is something I've wanted to start for many years (I'm 36 and am enjoying the "mental escape" model building provides).

I got the Transtar 4300 for $15 (can you believe that!) at a small hobby shop. It looks like it is from the late 70's / early 80's. The box had some water damage, but the contents are fine and even the decal sheet looks pretty good. The trailer was $30 and still in original cellophane which seemed like a good price as well.

I've read lots of the threads on here already and will continue to do so for more education.
ANY and ALL suggestions, tips and tricks are gladly welcome! Some of the 4300's on here look amazing, and I'm still debating on paint scheme ideas.

I'm thinking of starting with the trailer since it seems less complicated than the tractor...
Since I'm in the un-boxing stage, I need tips for early-on in the project. I'm going to begin prep sanding and was wondering if automotive grade scuff pads are acceptable for pre-paint preparation? (3M maroon pad) The trailer, for example, has tons of tiny bumps which are supposed to simulate the rivets on a real trailer, and I'm afraid even light sandpaper would remove them. I figure a scuff pad would be enough to prep?

I have a can of Testors Spray Enamel Semi Gloss Grey primer, and Testors Gloss White spray (for the trailer). I also picked up a can of Krylon Fusion gloss white which I am debating using instead of the Testors white (over the Testors Primer). Thoughts? I look forward to talking with you guys and learning!

Attached File  2002-12-08 12.00.00-131.jpg   99.02KB   9 downloads


Hey Anthony, welcome to the fun world of model trucks! For paint prep on the plastic pieces in those kits, all you need to do is wash them with very warm soapy water with a detergent like Dawn. All you want to do is remove any oils from the surface. Any abrasives might end up leaving scratches that will be seen after painting. There's all kinds of cool this available aftermarket if you want to add your own personal toches to your models. Always be sure and ask questions here if there's anything you might not sure about. There are lots of very knowledgeable people on this forum and everyone loves to help!

#3 Ben

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 07:22 PM

I forgot to mention, always be sure to "test" spray some scrap plastic before you start painting the actual model. Testors paints are made for models but Krylon can sometimes "craze" the plastic and leave a really rough finish. You always want to test different paints with each other on a scrap as well just in case they don't work well with each other.

#4 Fat Brian

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 08:23 PM

The best place to find sanding implements is a local beauty supply store. Pick up nail files in various grits, shapes, and sizes on the cheap, twenty dollars should get you a wide assorment.

#5 FLAWLESSVW

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 12:32 PM

Thanks for the replies guys. I am leaning more towards the Duplicolor paints after reading more on here. I'm taking your advice and doing the spoon test (with the ONLY plastic spoon I could find in the house! Going to need to hit up Burger King for more!)

Fat Brian, I will deplete my wife's stash first then, and go to Sally Beauty to restock after she notices :)

Ben, what type of aftermarket things do you mean? I'm not surprised that there is stuff available, but being so new to the scene, I have no idea what's out there. I got a message from a local guy inviting me to the meetup, so I'm sure after talking with all those guys for an hour or so I won't be quite so green!

#6 Fat Brian

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 05:10 PM

Check out all the stuff available at these sites:
http://www.ppvintage....com/index.html
http://www.auslowe.c...ntpage&Itemid=1
http://www.freewebs..../truckparts.htm
http://www.aitruckmo.../kitsparts.html

#7 clayton

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 09:59 AM

2 great kit to start off with.