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obscure questions - march madness!


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#41 southpier

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 01:47 PM

"enthusiastic operation" - love it! somehow i missed this post and figured folks were tired of me asking inane questions. thanks for the in depth answers.

#42 southpier

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 01:51 PM

now .... back to some "scratchbuilding" because that other thread has gotten a little out of hand.


i want to make some nerf bars for a dirt tracker. someone sent me a scan of an old magazine article that captions a photo of a front end including "... nerf bars made from concrete reinforcement...".

i thought if i rolled some .050 styrene rod between 2 coarse files i could texture it enough to look convincing from a few inches away.

Q: anyone think of a better way to make re-rod?

thanks

#43 Fat Brian

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:40 PM

Rebar is tough because the texture on it is raised not engraved. You might be able come up with something but it will be hard.

#44 southpier

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:20 PM

in the past three days i read a thread that (i think!) had a blue '32 Ford sedan with the roof cut out pictured. the poster specifically mentioned his affinity for building body framework.

 

having spent the better part of the evening doing just that same thing to an AMT '32 Victoria, i was wondering:

 

where's the post in question - i couldn't find it 5 pages into the "view new content" search thingie

 

and

 

could someone share the secrets of this apparent black art?

 

i struggled through it and came up with 2 good back inserts using cardstock & then styrene, but there must be a better way.

 

thanks



#45 southpier

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 11:17 PM

on the subject of detail ......... i recently read a post featuring a car with excruciatingly detailed parts in some places and very obviously overlooked basic fitting & finishing in others. i thought this detracted from the excellent work put into the areas which were finished so nicely.

 

i understand trying a new trick here and there, but when the grounding steps are overlooked, it brings it all down.

 

 

guess this really isn't a question afterall.



#46 southpier

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:08 AM

interesting comments regarding Revell's SD "rat roaster" elsewhere made me think: has anyone considered offering vacuumformed panels thin enough that the louvers could be opened up?

 

i imagine they would need to be made a little overscale to compensate for paint build up, but would this be possible for hood sides and trunk lids?

 

would just strips 'o' louvers (like the solid styrene once kit offered) be a viable alternative, with the builder responsible for cutting out the panel for flow through?



#47 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:12 AM

interesting comments regarding Revell's SD "rat roaster" elsewhere made me think: has anyone considered offering vacuumformed panels thin enough that the louvers could be opened up?

 

i imagine they would need to be made a little overscale to compensate for paint build up, but would this be possible for hood sides and trunk lids?

 

would just strips 'o' louvers (like the solid styrene once kit offered) be a viable alternative, with the builder responsible for cutting out the panel for flow through?

That would be tricker than snot (or is it slicker than snot?) but it's kinda in the micro-surgery realm. I've seen a couple of guys almost unbelieveably open the louvers on some vintage 1/25 racing cars, but man, you'd have to do it under magnification ...and forget about getting the openings all the same...there are no files that small, to my knowledge.  A real louver only sticks up 1/2 inch or so from the surface, so in 1/25th, the opening would be less than 1/2 of one mm.


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 23 January 2013 - 09:14 AM.


#48 southpier

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:41 AM

Minor point..."top loader" refers to access to the guts when one is servicing or assembling the gearbox. "Top-shift" is the distinction as to where the linkage goes in, like "top-shift '39 Ford" or "top-shift LaSalle", as opposed to side-shift.

Ford top-loader (The internals are partially accessed through the plate bolted to the top. Many gearboxes "load" from the sides or even the bottom.) with side shifter linkage connected to a through-floor shift lever........

toploader-shftr-1.jpg?1303598351
You're correct that column-shift linkage works with side-shifted gearboxes. There was a short time when column-shift was a cool setup in customs and rods, because it was the 'new thing' in production cars. I'll check the exact time period if you want.....You're also correct that it is usually less positive feeling than a floor shifter (because of the complexity of the linkage and the need for it to change direction, and to allow for movement of the gearbox on its rubber mount, relative to the chassis / body), hence the return to floor-shift for performance applications.

......

 

the question about column shifters came into my head again, so i searched this thread. since the Ace offered, could we agree that an early '50s rod could sport a '3 on the tree' ? and be plausibly "correct"? 

 

i'll be using the excellent picture to cobble together my linkage. how i get it to the stering wheel is anybody's guess!