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modelling research project


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#21 Art Anderson

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 06:39 AM

Greetings fellow modellers,

I am a graduate student at the University of North Texas and a modeller. As a design student, I am interested in studying modelling as an activity, especially with regard to the differences between modellers interested in reproducing existing objects and those interested in kitbashing etc. for the purposes of creating something new out of their imaginations. I am currently doing a study on this difference, and would be much appreciative of anyone in this community who would be willing to answer a few questions. If you are interested, answer the following in response to this thread:


Model-making methods and processes: a hermeneutic research project

Questionnaire

Please answer the following questions in your own words:

1. What is a model kit? A box with ready-made parts, for assembly according to instructions
2. What activities (e.g. painting, sanding, burnishing) do you associate with modelling: Sanding, filing, cutting, burnishing, polishing
3. Do you follow instructions when building a model? Only if it's a new kit, with assembly steps or part I don't recognize
4. How skilled are you at modelling? Subjective question, seriously! As one who is doing research at the college level, this question is VERY subjective. That said, I've been building model car kits for right at 60 years, so I have experienced just about all there is to experienced--consider me highly skilled.

5. What are kit conversions? Have you ever done a kit conversion? As a former manufacturer of hand-cast urethane resin model car kits and conversions, I've done several hundred over the years--before I got into resin casting, I built over 200 models of Indianapolis 500 cars, 98% of which were conversions, from one subject to another.
6. What is kitbashing? Have you ever kitbashed? Kitbashing is simply the art (or craft) of combining various parts or portions thereof of different model kits to arrive at a different version of what might have been produced by a model company.
7. What is the object of model-making? What is the end product? Most all model builders would say that it is purely our hobby, our window into the world of creativity. But the bottom line is, almost all of us do it because it's there, and it's a challenge, and it's fun
Frankly, your questions are so simple as to appear almost sophomoric (now go look that up in your dictionary).

All material included in the research report will be anonymous.

Thank you very much for your time & best wishes



#22 slownlow

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:03 AM

To me "scratch building" is also creating new components for an existing cast model. For example, fender skirts, exhaust, tuck and rolled interiors......and much more.
on this Rommel Rod the items scratch built are- tailgate hinges, exhaust pipes, hood ornament, wood truck bed, wood box, lower side panels damaged in track fender repositionl, headlight lenses,door decals and roof.

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#23 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:05 AM

as Carl Sagen implied, to make an apple pie, first you must invent the universe



Ummmm.....what do you have to invent first to make a cherry pie?

#24 slownlow

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:25 AM

William, that question is just the pits.

#25 chepp

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 09:25 AM

1. What is a model kit?
A collection of parts and instructions that can be used to make a representation of another object. Typically, the kit is composed of plastic shapes molded in the shape of the object's parts. Other materials are sometimes included such as steel axles, screws or other structural parts. Decals, and sometimes photo-etched bright metal details, are also typical components.
2. What activities (e.g. painting, sanding, burnishing) do you associate with modelling? Removing the parts from sprues, sanding/scraping mold parting lines, gluing sub-assemblies together, painting and polishing are typical activities. Cutting, grinding, re-shaping, adding parts from other kits and/or making additional parts from non-kit materials such as sheet plastic, metal tubing and so on are also common activities for more advanced model builders.
3. Do you follow instructions when building a model?
I refer to them when building sub-assemblies that are not easily understood by observing the parts, but generally I don't build the kit following the instructions from beginning to end. Most of my builds tend to use one or more kits to make models that have little in common with the kits they started from.
4. How skilled are you at modelling?
Advanced amateur. I often don't get it looking "right" the first time but I have the patience to continue shaping/sanding/painting until it is -- or completely re-make a part.
5. What are kit conversions? Have you ever done a kit conversion?
I'm guessing that it means making a different item than the kit was designed to represent, For example, converting a Camaro Z/28 coupe into a Camaro SS convertible. No.
6. What is kitbashing? Have you ever kitbashed?
Kitbashing is using parts from two or more kits to make a model. A simple example would be using the body from one kit on a chassis from another. Yes.
7. What is the object of model-making? What is the end product?
For me, it's a creative activity that I use to make something that I like to look at. I may enter the model in a contest to see how it compares with other entries. Whether in-person or online, building and showing the model (both during construction as well as finished) is a social activity as well even though I'm alone when building it. In a literal sense, the end product is a small version of an actual or imagined larger object, usually a vehicle. In a broader sense, the end product represents the skill of the builder where the process of building is probably more important than the model itself.

Edited by chepp, 29 October 2012 - 09:29 AM.


#26 bbowser

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:21 PM

Seems to me the only relevant question is the last one, the rest all seem pretty obvious? For some it's the journey, for others the destination (pretty much like everything else in life).

When I was a kid modeling taught me a lot about cars and how they work (also aircraft, naval craft, armor, etc) as well as building dexterity, problem solving, and building confidence. Now I build as a stress reducer (most of the time :blink: ) and to have tokens of the real cars I would own if I were Jay Leno. Sites like this one that let us share our work and constructive criticisms have helped me step up my game although I wouldn't call myself anything above average. Great thread, I hope this helps you in your studies.

#27 charlie8575

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 02:23 PM

Seems to me the only relevant question is the last one, the rest all seem pretty obvious? For some it's the journey, for others the destination (pretty much like everything else in life).

When I was a kid modeling taught me a lot about cars and how they work (also aircraft, naval craft, armor, etc) as well as building dexterity, problem solving, and building confidence. Now I build as a stress reducer (most of the time :blink: ) and to have tokens of the real cars I would own if I were Jay Leno. Sites like this one that let us share our work and constructive criticisms have helped me step up my game although I wouldn't call myself anything above average. Great thread, I hope this helps you in your studies.


I second just about everything Bob said, except that none of my cars have been cool enough to kit- except my four 1991-96 GM B-body wagons and I don't have the cash to blow on four Modelhaus kits right now.

Someday, though, I will.

Charlie Larkin

#28 blunc

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:35 PM

Ummmm.....what do you have to invent first to make a cherry pie?

Cherries... just sayin... ;)

#29 Art Anderson

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 03:31 AM

Noted--but, according to the dictionary, both are acceptable. Perhaps the double L is out of fashion; I will switch to the single L, if you indeed think it the more apt. Thanks for the advice.


From what I've read of British model magazines, Modelling (with two L's) seems to be the preferred spelling across the pond, and yes, this version is an acceptable spelling here in the USA.

Art

#30 sjordan2

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 03:56 AM

From what I've read of British model magazines, Modelling (with two L's) seems to be the preferred spelling across the pond, and yes, this version is an acceptable spelling here in the USA.

Art


When I searched for this cover, my spellcheck didn't like using the double L, but Art and the others are correct. However, something else is amiss here...

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#31 Art Anderson

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 04:03 AM

Greetings fellow modellers,

I am a graduate student at the University of North Texas and a modeller. As a design student, I am interested in studying modelling as an activity, especially with regard to the differences between modellers interested in reproducing existing objects and those interested in kitbashing etc. for the purposes of creating something new out of their imaginations. I am currently doing a study on this difference, and would be much appreciative of anyone in this community who would be willing to answer a few questions. If you are interested, answer the following in response to this thread:


Model-making methods and processes: a hermeneutic research project

Questionnaire

Please answer the following questions in your own words:

1. What is a model kit A package including supplies (anything from raw pieces of wood, to completely formed, molded plastic or metal parts, along with instructions or scale drawings for the purpose of building a model)
2. What activities (e.g. painting, sanding, burnishing) do you associate with modelling? All of these, but many more activities, including but not limited to making parts, perhaps complete assemblies, even body shells from scratch ("from scratch" is defined as using basic, raw materials to achieve the desired result)
3. Do you follow instructions when building a model?It all depends. If the kit for the model is one I have done before, instructions may not be necessary, but generally "yes, I do follow instructions (see my comments about kitbashing, conversions and scratchbuilding)
4. How skilled are you at modelling?More skilled than I sometimes claim credit as having, less skilled than often I want to think I am.
5. What are kit conversions? Have you ever done a kit conversion? Converting, or changing the kit from the manufactured subject to something different, as in a different version of the same basic model car. And yes, I've done a good many conversions of model cars, to produce in result a different version of the same series of car, or even to take say, a Chevrolet Impala Convertible, convert it to a Chevrolet Biscayne sedan, which can involve "kit bashing" (in this case, using the roof from a '59 Cadillac, along with the windshield assembly from a '59 El Camino, to come up with a '59 Chevrolet Biscayne 2dr sedan. Also included in a project such as this meant modifying the interior panels, dashboard, steering wheel and seats both front and rear.
6. What is kitbashing? Have you ever kitbashed? "Kitbashing" is simply the use of portions and/or parts of more than one dissimilar model kit to come up with the desired subject as a result. This can be as simple as using say, the engine from "Kit A" with "Kit B" to come up with a finished Model C.
7. What is the object of model-making? What is the end product?, For me, as a model car builder, the object is to have, at completion, a miniature replica of an actual vehicle or perhaps a vehicle that could actually have been built in real life.

All material included in the research report will be anonymous.

Thank you very much for your time & best wishes



#32 Greg Myers

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 05:33 AM

Umm... Excuse me? Non-US English speaking? Don't you mean US version? I believe Canada, a Commonwealth nation, use's the correct term, as do we here in Australia.... I believe the US had a war with the British & became Independent, and decided it would change a few words etc around to suit them, no?
I mean fair dinkum Harry, the guy ask's a pretty decent question/s & you're the first 1 to jump on & comment but all you say is you spelt modelling incorrect? Sad coming from a moderator....
Dan

My thoughts exactly. Here's a good chance to further our hobby and we go off on a typical ranting frolic.

#33 W-409

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 06:00 AM

1. What is a model kit?
-Model kit is basically a box with parts what can be put together to present a model and maybe some reference material and instructions.

2. What activities (e.g. painting, sanding, burnishing) do you associate with modelling?
-Cutting, slicing, sanding, smoothing, puttying (however it is said), painting, polishing, assembling, cleaning, foiling etc. And rarely weathering. I have no idea what burnishing means, so I don't count it in here.

3. Do you follow instructions when building a model?
-Yes and No. If I've built the same kit already once, I may not need the instructions. But usually I double check little details from instructions, if I'm not sure which way valve covers need to be installed (problem with Mopar engines :lol: ) and what locator pin needs to be attached in what place. Also I might look colors for parts from the instructions.

4. How skilled are you at modelling?
-Not too special, but not the worst one either. I've built little over 50 models right now, and more is coming all the time. I'm trying to get better with every model I build, but it doesn't always go like that. Decide yourself: http://tapahtumakuvi...Models By Niko/

5. What are kit conversions? Have you ever done a kit conversion?
-I'd say that making modifications to model kits is kit conversions. For example Chopping '50 Oldsmobile would be a kit conversion for me. And yes, I've done kit conversions many, many times. Most of my builds have some kind of kit conversions done, like making a flip nose to my Chevy Beretta Bracket car, or making roll cage for '59 Simca Gasser.

6. What is kitbashing? Have you ever kitbashed?
-Using parts from more than one model kits. For example buying a '50 Oldsmobile model kit, taking the chassis from Revell Pro Sportsman Chevrolet and engine from MPC Pro Stock Camaro kit. I've done many times kitbashing, it's fun and gives alot more possibilities to have little more unique or different model than everyone else.

7. What is the object of model-making? What is the end product?
- For me as a car modeler, the object is to have fun and complete models as I'd like to have or drive in 1:1 world too. Also getting better modeler is good object.

#34 sjordan2

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 06:48 AM

Yup! The number on the grille is upside down! ;)


Close, actually. The picture is backward. Check the positions of the windscreens and carburetor stone guard. On my copy of the book, it's easier to see that the steering wheel is also on the wrong side.

Edited by sjordan2, 30 October 2012 - 07:14 AM.


#35 Harry P.

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 08:45 AM

Close, actually. The picture is backward. Check the positions of the windscreens and carburetor stone guard. On my copy of the book, it's easier to see that the steering wheel is also on the wrong side.


And you can clearly see that the "8" is backwards...




:lol:

#36 sjordan2

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 08:49 AM

And you can clearly see that the "8" is backwards...


:lol:


The funny thing is that a few years ago I was corresponding with Gerald Wingrove on another subject, and when I mentioned it, he wasn't aware of it. Meanwhile, back to your regularly scheduled thread topic. Sorry for the hijack.

Edited by sjordan2, 30 October 2012 - 08:50 AM.


#37 Junkman

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 10:31 AM

1. What is a model kit?

Something that comes in a carton box with an illustration on top, consists of injection moulded polystyrene plastic runners or sprues with components attached to them, that can be assembled into one or more three-dimensional objects.


2. What activities (e.g. painting, sanding, burnishing) do you associate with modelling?

There are very few activities I don't associate with modeling and I won't list them here.



3. Do you follow instructions when building a model?

It depends on the complexity of the model, but as a rule of thumb, real men don't read instructions.



4. How skilled are you at modelling?

ROFL. Go ask John Teresi.



5. What are kit conversions? Have you ever done a kit conversion?

Very few. But I have started hundreds...



6. What is kitbashing? Have you ever kitbashed?

Kitbashing is combining components from two or more model kits in order to create something neither of the kits would have yielded on its own.
Yes, I kitbash frequently. This leads to a chain reaction. Since many of my kits aren't complete because of said kitbashing, I have to kitbash ever more.



7. What is the object of model-making? What is the end product?

I assume you mean 'objective'?

The objective is to create an image of something one loves to look at, and it is generally motivated by the same appreciation of form and function, as creating art, or artefacts. The end product should be an object resembling this image as close as possible.


#38 ultraspacemobile

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 08:11 PM

Thank you all again for responding to my questionnaire! I know the questions may seem simplistic--and, as one poster suggested, "sophmoric"--but the answers I have obtained so far have given me valuable insight into the different ways modelers conceptualize the activity and the materials associated with it.

By the way, does anyone here have any suggestions for other popular modeling forums from which I could solicit responses?

#39 Junkman

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 12:43 PM

The spectrum could possibly be further broadened by contacting modeling forums in other countries than the USA.
Different societies may have different outlooks on the hobby, who knows.
Modeling is as old as culture itself and in one form or another has been practiced in every single one of them.
Even the cavemen were modeling, as countless finds prove.

#40 bbowser

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 01:06 PM

The spectrum could possibly be further broadened by contacting modeling forums in other countries than the USA.
Different societies may have different outlooks on the hobby, who knows.
Modeling is as old as culture itself and in one form or another has been practiced in every single one of them.
Even the cavemen were modeling, as countless finds prove.


I knew we were all cavemen! George Carlin said we're all just monkeys with car keys!