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3D-printed 1/24 scale 15" Vector Wheel


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#41 Chief Joseph

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 05:01 PM

Thank you for your comments!

After talking to a few guys today, I think I will be offering a version of the vector wheel with the lug nuts and centercap attached.  It'll be just one piece like a normal Monogram wheel front.  It'll be slightly cheaper than the version with separate parts, but the trade-off is it'll be harder to paint.  

 

The grille is coming soon.  Stay tuned on that.

 

The Buick GN is undergoing something of a renaissance right now.  December 11th was the 25th anniversary of the last GN rolling off the production line, and there has been a documentary film released this week called "Black Air."  The film explores the unique culture surrounding the cars and the people who own them.  And the Grand National will be re-introduced by GM, built on the same platform as the outstanding Cadillac ATS. Yeah, 4-doors but at least it's RWD.  



#42 azers

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 07:14 PM

Yeah.ill look forward to the grill just let us know. And ill take a few sets of the new vector wheels when your ready. Just keep us updated. Better go get my buick on payday.

#43 Scuderia

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 10:02 PM

Great to hear about the grille that looked very slick. Will definitely make me by multiples of the GN and GNX kits for ideas. Your craftsmanship is great



#44 brodie_83

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 03:59 AM

I'm in for the multiple-piece wheels...it's all about detail and accuracy for me! I also heard about that GN documentary movie and saw a teaser trailer of it on YouTube awhile back. I'm guessing it's making it's way to DVD...I gotta have that too! Someday I'm determined to buy back my '87 GN that I never should have sold in the first place...I miss the heck out of that car!

#45 azers

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 06:30 AM

I like both ideas multi piece wheels for us detail fanatics, one piece wheels for those of us with limited dexterity and want the look still. Ill take them in both versions please.

#46 Ben

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 09:25 AM

That's some really nice work on those wheels and that grille!!!!!!!!!



#47 azers

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:01 PM

Recieved my vectors today. Really nice. Curious to see the one piece vectors. Can't wait for your next project. Joe.

#48 chase-cars

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 12:16 PM

That's kind of an open-ended question...

 

I don't do any of the resin casting, that's done by talented people who are good at it, and have been doing it for years.  I create some custom parts like wheels, tires, alternative front ends (to change my '74 Dodge Monaco to a '77 Dodge Monaco Royal) and get them 3D printed.  I use ProEngineer software because I use it at work all the time, then upload the 3D files to somewhere like Shapeways or iMaterialise and they send me a master model.

 

This gets used as the master model for the silicone mold :)



#49 Bernard Kron

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 06:11 AM

Along with NormL's thread on modeling his Atom, this is a great thread helping to flesh out the issues surrounding this rapidly progressing technology. It's following the general path I've seen with other computer-based technologies which eventually migrated to the home computer platform. I can remember the early days of Aldus Pagemaker and Photoshop, running them on 386 computers and sending the results out to service bureaus for output of acceptable quality.  Even with today's powerful home computers, cheap data storage, commonly available photo art and drawings at little or no cost, and even high speed cloud (on line) computing, it's still advisable in many cases to use a service bureau for certain types of high quality output when the front end capital investment (for printers, materials, etc.) doesn't make sense or is simply unavailable.

 

In our world consider white or metallic colored decals. You may be able to create the original art on your home compuer, and even look at a proof by printing out in high resolution on your home inkjet or laser printer, a printer which may have cost you as little as $50.00. But you still have to go to someone who has a Micro-Dry or die sublimation printer (Alps, Oki, etc.) to get final output on decal stock. The cost of printers and supplies is prohibitive for the home hobbyist who may print 10-15 sheets of decals per year on the outside, and even fewer that actually require this technology. So, while making and printing decals is now a common part of our hobby, it still makes sense to job out parts of the process. And very importantly, cheap printing didn't destroy the aftermarket in decals or remove them from the inside of model kits.

 

Rapid Prototyping and 3D printing have evolved at breakneck speed. Home printing is a reality. High strength, high density print media are starting to be a reality. (Some F1 teams are now printing work parts in the pits during race meetings to mount and use on their cars immediately.) High resolution output is a reality. Over time all these key elements will continue to cheapen. The time it takes to process and print output will continue to shrink. But video game enthusiasts don't generally create their own game objects, any more than we car modelers make our own decals or mix our own paints.

 

The key issues to watch going forward are printer resolution at low prices, and the general availability of fused media technologies and high density print materials. For the hobbyist modeler cheap, fast printers, smooth surfaces for larger objects (bodies), accurate and finely detailed small objects and easily produced and/or readily available 3D drawings will be the pivot points that make the promise of this technology a reality. It will be at that point the Harry's vision will become something that we will add to our world, but not necessaily to the exclusion of the ways we do it now (purchasing complete kits and aftermarket parts).

 

Having said all this I gotta say, those Vector wheels are gorgeous!!! :)  B)



#50 spkgibson

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 02:14 AM

I have a suggestion for you....How about making a 1973-74 style Dodge Dart grill.....And the factory stock 71 Duster full wheel covers...And also the 70-71 Dodge full wheel covers for the up coming 71' Dodge Demon....They could also be used on Challengers...Coronets....Chargers...And Super Bees.....I would need about 12 sets.....And 5 of the 73-74 Dart grills....Would possibly be a great seller to Mopar fans.



#51 Chief Joseph

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 04:12 PM

Well, about two months ago we moved from a house to a condo, which means all my casting work came to a halt.  I'm working on getting a fume hood/paint booth so I can get back into the business of making parts for my models.  In the meantime, I have plunged headlong into digital modeling.  I'm working on a bunch of items to have 3D-printed, so when I get back to casting I'll have stuff to work with.  I can make a digital master in a fraction of the time it takes to make a scratchbuilt master, but getting the digital files printed is an expensive proposition.  I made this wheel for the 84-85 Buick Regal T-Type today:

85t3_zpsb2374ae8.jpg

(Pic from GNTTYPE,org)

TType_zpsaf7d2c92.png

 

I altered the design just slightly so the wheels can be cast in a one-piece mold.  I wish I had done that with my Vector wheel... oh, wait... all I have to do is open up the Vector wheel file, make a few edits, have it printed ($), and voilà, I have a new version without the hassle of modifying a scratchbuilt master.  Using the "power of computerized technology,"  I can make tire/wheel assemblies that match up very well:

BFG-TType_zps1bb0cc30.png

 

 

Now if I just had an Objet Eden printer, I could print these at home.  If I had an extra $65K sitting around, I could pick up this one on eBay!

 

 



#52 azers

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 06:29 PM

Ill be waiting for new items when you release them. Joe

#53 Len Woodruff

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:27 AM

Well, about two months ago we moved from a house to a condo, which means all my casting work came to a halt.  I'm working on getting a fume hood/paint booth so I can get back into the business of making parts for my models.  In the meantime, I have plunged headlong into digital modeling.  I'm working on a bunch of items to have 3D-printed, so when I get back to casting I'll have stuff to work with.  I can make a digital master in a fraction of the time it takes to make a scratchbuilt master, but getting the digital files printed is an expensive proposition.  I made this wheel for the 84-85 Buick Regal T-Type today:

85t3_zpsb2374ae8.jpg

(Pic from GNTTYPE,org)

TType_zpsaf7d2c92.png

 

I altered the design just slightly so the wheels can be cast in a one-piece mold.  I wish I had done that with my Vector wheel... oh, wait... all I have to do is open up the Vector wheel file, make a few edits, have it printed ($), and voilà, I have a new version without the hassle of modifying a scratchbuilt master.  Using the "power of computerized technology,"  I can make tire/wheel assemblies that match up very well:

BFG-TType_zps1bb0cc30.png

 

 

Now if I just had an Objet Eden printer, I could print these at home.  If I had an extra $65K sitting around, I could pick up this one on eBay!

 

 

 

What software do you have to use for the 3-D artwork Joe?



#54 Chief Joseph

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:19 AM

 
What software do you have to use for the 3-D artwork Joe?

Autodesk Inventor. Parametric modeling, similar in function to Solidworks or Catia. It's totally useless for organic items, but for things like this it is excellent.

#55 Foxer

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:21 AM

I just opened 3ds Max for the first time in years the other day to show my wife how a cat tree we bought will look in the house.  Maybe it time to get back modeling the way 3D Printers are so much in the news!


Edited by Foxer, 07 April 2013 - 02:22 AM.