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sharing scans of books........


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#1 B_rad88

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:23 PM

hey guys, long time no chat. been absent for awhile and now im back. well let me get to the point...


i checked out a few model car building books from the library tring to find some extra tips and stuff, and i was wondering would i get into trouble if i scaned the books and posted them here for other ppl to enjoy? i going to scan them for my personal use, but i wasnt sure about sharing them. 2 of the books are old.... like really old by DENNIS DOTY, and another book too. i know alot of ppl have read them and ect. but for those who havent or anyone else that wants some extra referance materials, i wasnt sure. any answers would be greatly welcomed!


thank you, and ill post pics of my finished civic coupe sometime soon....... lol

Brandon

#2 Harry P.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:27 PM

Pretty sure if you read the fine print up front it'll say something about any unauthorized reproduction, distribution, etc., without the author's or publisher's permission is not allowed.

#3 B_rad88

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:46 PM

ok, i just want to be safe and not sorry, you know. there is one person on here that scaned and posted a model mag article on how to make a working soft top for a 1/24th scale, but that was like years ago......

#4 Skydime

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 08:08 PM

Yeah, I am pretty sure I wouldn't do it even it the books have no copyrights. It would be fairly dirty to compile months and possibly years of work to sell a book and then have someone give it away for free without the author(')s(') permission.

But now, I am sure that a listing of the book authors and titles wouldn't hurt.

Edited by Skydime, 23 November 2012 - 08:10 PM.


#5 2002p51

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:05 PM

Yeah, I am pretty sure I wouldn't do it even it the books have no copyrights. It would be fairly dirty to compile months and possibly years of work to sell a book and then have someone give it away for free without the author(')s(') permission.


All books are copyrighted, as are photographs.

Scanning and sharing of photos is just as bad.

There are some who believe that any photos that are out on the web are "free" for the taking.

Not so.

Be careful, my friends.

#6 Greg Myers

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 05:13 AM

Yeah, I read all that. Why not just show us what books you liked Brandon. I often Google books I've heard about here on the board. There are many sources. Just picked up a really old one from Aurora Plastics.
Posted Image

#7 2002p51

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 05:58 AM


allow for limited and reasonable uses as long as the use does not interfere with owners’ rights or impede their right to do with the work as they wish.


review a book, a new piece of technology, a food product or whatever widget,


allow copyrighted works to be used without permission for the benefit of the public.



The above is true, but that does not allow someone to take a photo they find on the web and post it on their Facebook page for example. That's not a book review nor does it "benefit . . .the public".

Fair Use was created specifically to allow things like movie trailers, book reviews, music reviews, etc., and etc. that provide a beneficial service to both the public and the original author.

Those modelers who go out on the web and find "reference" photos for a model they are working on then save them in a Fotki album which they then share on a model board like this one are, technically speaking, violating the copyright of the that photo's owner.

Now of course, the likely hood of anybody being prosecuted for something like that is very, very low. But we should know that the law exists and be careful with what we do with the photos we find out there in internet land!

#8 Harry P.

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:03 AM

Now of course, the likely hood of anybody being prosecuted for something like that is very, very low. But we should know that the law exists and be careful with what we do with the photos we find out there in internet land!


What about the fact that Google makes the photos available in the first place?

#9 sjordan2

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:25 AM

Where you're most likely to get into trouble is if you make unapproved copies of copyrighted materials for commercial purposes or profit. For example, people who have offered copyrighted material that they have compiled themselves, for sale on a place like eBay - Ferrari and others have come down hard on those offerings. And we've seen small, cottage-industry decal makers get cease-and-desist orders from copyright holders. A few years ago, I was able to obtain complete digital files of things like Ferrari and Jaguar owner's manuals and parts manuals, and I never see them anymore on eBay. Today, the copyright police have more resources than ever.

Scanning a whole book is right in there with piracy of copyrighted materials like DVDs, music, etc. Not a good idea, and I certainly wouldn't make it available online.

#10 Mercman

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:31 AM

Best thing to do is ask for permission. I found a print by Dale Klee that I wanted to make a model of. I wrote him and got his permission to copy the print. I have to add the disclaimer that IS NOT MY WORK (print) and was given permission to use it.

#11 Mercman

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:33 AM

Another question comes to mind, How long is the copyrite good for on printed material. If the publication has been gone for a long time?

#12 2002p51

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:49 AM

What about the fact that Google makes the photos available in the first place?


Google found themselves in court many times over exactly that. In some cases they have had to remove the links, in others the copyright holders realized that the link to their website was beneficial.

Just this morning I was reading an article about copyright protection in the world of social media. The last time there was a review and update of copyright laws was in 1998, well before the existence of Google, Facebook, Twitter, et. al.

The entire subject of copyright in the face of new technology is constantly changing and evolving.

As a professional photographer who relies on the sale and publication of my photos for at least part of my income, copyright is something that I am very concerned about and try to stay up on everything that is going on.

But I do have to pick my battles. If a client right clicks a photo from my Facebook page and puts it on his I'm not going to launch an all out legal attack. However, if that same client was to put that photo on a t-shirt and start selling them, he and I would have a serious talk. :D

#13 2002p51

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:51 AM

Another question comes to mind, How long is the copyrite good for on printed material. If the publication has been gone for a long time?


The copyright is good for the lifetime of the creator plus 70 years.

#14 Dr. Cranky

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 07:06 AM

I don't recommend it. I just paid 69 dollars for GASSER WARS which is a book that has been out of print and very hard to get. The best thing to do for those of us who collect books is just to keep an eye open for when a copy goes on sale for a reasonable price.

That's the best way of keeping up your collection without getting into any sort of copyright violation trouble. Besides, part of the fun of collecting materials is the hunt!

#15 Darin Bastedo

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 07:27 AM

I agree that posting the books here in their entirety would be bad, though I think it would be a great service to us if you posted maybe the cover, and a brief review of the book and what you particularly liked or disliked about it. that way if we were interested we could hunt down a copy of it ourselves. Often I can find books on amazon or through my local used book store cheap.

as far as downloading reference pictures, often I download pics from classic and other car dealers, with their permission. Often times you will find a polite email to them will get you permission fairly easily. (and sometimes they will send you hi-res copies by email.) Once the car is sold, often to them, the photo has lost all commercial value to them. Things get stickier when you are dealing with an photographer who see's the photograph as a salable piece of art. While I agree that they should be able to protect their copyright it is foolishness to post that photo to a blog or photo sharing site, and expect that the photo won't be copied or downloaded. water marking the photo helps, but even then if you are worried about that it's best you keep your photos off the internet.

#16 CadillacPat

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:09 AM

In the past decade I've seen my own CadillacPat's DieCast Customizing Tutorials copied word for word, used as promotional descriptions on eBay, even partially paraphrased and posted as someone's own.
Doesn't bother me a bit since it proves the writings are not only appreciated but used to great length.
Everything I write is posted for FREE use so I find the plagiarism amusing.

CadillacPat

#17 CadillacPat

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:19 AM

People who make a living from writing would not agree.


Let me clue you in Ace,
I do make a living from the information in my CadillacPat's DieCast Customizing Tutorials!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
And,
I am glad they are read and used to such an extent.

Anyone can copy and paste Ace!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

#18 southpier

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:35 AM

first we need to define "original". every idea is based on something which has come before it. all boils down to the filters applied by the "originator".

#19 2002p51

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:51 AM

Things get stickier when you are dealing with a photographer who see's the photograph as a salable piece of art. While I agree that they should be able to protect their copyright it is foolishness to post that photo to a blog or photo sharing site, and expect that the photo won't be copied or downloaded. water marking the photo helps, but even then if you are worried about that it's best you keep your photos off the internet.


This is exactly right. The problem comes in that one almost NEEDS to use social media to promote their work these days. To ignore Facebook and other social media is to be almost invisible to any potential market. So you just have to make up your mind that you're going to lose some control to gain some exposure and not lose any sleep over it.

Fotki has a right click protect feature that I use but Facebook is like the wild frontier!

One thing that I do is post only low resolution versions of any photos. Yes, they can still be used on Facebook pages and e-mails and such, but they cannot make decent prints or use them in any sort of printed material.

Believe it or not, there are still some honest people out there who will contact me about payment for use of my photos on their website. It happens. :)

#20 sjordan2

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 11:38 AM

I agree that posting the books here in their entirety would be bad, though I think it would be a great service to us if you posted maybe the cover, and a brief review of the book and what you particularly liked or disliked about it. that way if we were interested we could hunt down a copy of it ourselves. Often I can find books on amazon or through my local used book store cheap.

as far as downloading reference pictures, often I download pics from classic and other car dealers, with their permission. Often times you will find a polite email to them will get you permission fairly easily. (and sometimes they will send you hi-res copies by email.) Once the car is sold, often to them, the photo has lost all commercial value to them. Things get stickier when you are dealing with an photographer who see's the photograph as a salable piece of art. While I agree that they should be able to protect their copyright it is foolishness to post that photo to a blog or photo sharing site, and expect that the photo won't be copied or downloaded. water marking the photo helps, but even then if you are worried about that it's best you keep your photos off the internet.


Nothing wrong with the limited use you suggest, and to a certain point it's quite legal.

As to owners of saleable material, there is an awesome car photographer (www.schlegelmilch.com) who makes his images available to registered site members for posting however they want. He makes money from doing coffee-table books and selling beautiful prints of these shots, but posts them on his site in smaller file sizes, with a very subtle watermark, for anyone to use.