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Marker renderings of traditional Rods and Customs, etc


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#1 traditional

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 07:16 AM

These marker sketches were done 6 or 7 years ago when I was just in the mood for doing something other than working on 1/1 cars or scale models. Some of the vehicles are from memory and many use reference to real vehicles although not necessarily in the illustrated position. Only two represent a particular real vehicle..the '58 Reventlow Scarab, and the Isetta that my brother and I own and restored 20 years ago.

As you can see,  the subject matter represents my somewhat traditional hot rod tastes.

 

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#2 traditional

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 07:17 AM

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Edited by traditional, 16 December 2012 - 07:19 AM.


#3 uncle potts

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 07:35 AM

Wish I could do that!



#4 Jantrix

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 07:56 AM

That's some talent right there. Nice work.



#5 jeffs396

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 08:56 AM

Those are incredibly realistic Cliff!

 

Nice! B)



#6 Chuck Most

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 10:52 AM

Not a Chevy guy at all, but that Advance Series pickup needs to be built!



#7 Casey

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 11:37 AM

:wub:  Beautiful renderings, Clifford.



#8 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 01:50 PM

Man, you're about as good as Foose. Seriously, beautiful work. Wow.



#9 Austin T

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 03:42 PM

So cool,you sir have tallent. :rolleyes:



#10 Harry P.

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 05:38 PM

Very nice! Tell me more. What paper are they on? Do you do a line drawing first and then fill in the colors? I assume you used templates? Highlights done with goache? I want the details!   :D



#11 rmvw guy

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 05:49 PM

You like what I like, I just wish I could draw like you, beautiful!!!

#12 traditional

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 01:38 AM

Very nice! Tell me more. What paper are they on? Do you do a line drawing first and then fill in the colors? I assume you used templates? Highlights done with goache? I want the details!   :D

I use Letraset A4 paper (bleedproof) and, yes, I start with a rough pencil or pen sketch which I then slip under the A4 paper and use Pilot pens for the tighter line drawing. The markers are Pantone and the highlights are Prismacolor white pencil with the white flashes (I call them bird s--t) done with dabs of old style typing 'white-out'. 

I have various curves and ellipse guides that I have left over from my 'Industrial Design' days.

 

The Letraset paper is great because it allows the controlled blending of the markers without the 'spreading' that happens on most absorbent papers.



#13 darquewanderer

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:06 AM

The drawings are beautiful. Love to be able to do this.



#14 Harry P.

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 05:59 AM

I use Letraset A4 paper (bleedproof) and, yes, I start with a rough pencil or pen sketch which I then slip under the A4 paper and use Pilot pens for the tighter line drawing. The markers are Pantone and the highlights are Prismacolor white pencil with the white flashes (I call them bird s--t) done with dabs of old style typing 'white-out'. 

I have various curves and ellipse guides that I have left over from my 'Industrial Design' days.

 

The Letraset paper is great because it allows the controlled blending of the markers without the 'spreading' that happens on most absorbent papers.

 

Yep, just as I thought! I used to do it pretty much the same way until Photoshop came along. Now it's been so long since I've actually drawn something by hand, I doubt I could even still do it anymore!  :rolleyes:

 

But I still have my full set of markers, ellipse guides and ship's curves, etc. Probably even have a pad or two of paper left somewhere... but haven't touched any of it in over 20 years.



#15 traditional

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 06:25 AM

 

Yep, just as I thought! I used to do it pretty much the same way until Photoshop came along. Now it's been so long since I've actually drawn something by hand, I doubt I could even still do it anymore!  :rolleyes:

 

But I still have my full set of markers, ellipse guides and ship's curves, etc. Probably even have a pad or two of paper left somewhere... but haven't touched any of it in over 20 years.

I guess I'm a bit of a 'Luddite' because, although I happily use the computer for communication, downloading digital pics, and browsing hobby stuff, I am too intimidated by anything but relatively simple tasks on the computer. That's not to say that I'm unimpressed by computer art...Photoshop, Alias, etc......I'm truly amazed by it.  It's just not something that I expect to ever have the dedication or time to learn.  You know...you can't teach an old dog..........



#16 Harry P.

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 11:16 AM

You know...you can't teach an old dog..........

 

I used to think the same thing. I was a graphic artist/designer, doing it all the "old fashioned" way... airbrush, Letraset, illustration board, Parafilm... the whole shebang.

 

Then along came Photoshop and Illustrator and Quark Express, and sudden;y my world changed forever. It was either learn how to do it all on the computer now, or find another line of work. So I was literally forced to learn it. It was a pretty tough transition, as I had never had any sort of computer training at all. Learning how to do what you do for a living in a whole new and different way, while you're still trying to make a living doing it as you learn, was a pretty nerve-wracking experience.



#17 Harry P.

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 11:19 AM

BTW... I really like Photoshop now!

 

elvis.jpg

 

2002Avenger.jpg

 

cougar2.jpg



#18 traditional

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:26 PM

BTW... I really like Photoshop now!

 

elvis.jpg

 

2002Avenger.jpg

 

cougar2.jpg

Harry, those illustrations are truly outstanding and you obviously handled the Photoshop transition really skillfully. I'm very impressed with your talent.

Although the computer design programs were coming in during my last few years as an Industrial Designer, I was still able to successfully continue using my drawing and modelling skills until I retired. Certainly, the younger designers were coming in with computer skills and the entire profession is now completely tied to the use of computer design tools .. The only shortcoming that I notice is that the younger designers now have less ability to 'ideate'...throw out a bunch of ideas and alternatives at the beginning of a project. They tend to develop one idea on the computer and perhaps miss opportunities to differentiate in the marketplace. Although I'm long retired, I still get contracts from time to time from some of my friends in the business to explore a variety of ideas in quick sketch form. My ability to look at products from another angle and explore different ideas has netted me 127 patents over the years.

These days, though, I much prefer my hobbies.......1/1 cars and scale models, and I'm tending to refuse design contracts.... for selfish reasons only.


Edited by traditional, 17 December 2012 - 12:28 PM.


#19 Harry P.

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 01:23 PM

I hope you realize how lucky you are... to be able to refuse contracts and work on hobbies instead! Man, what I wouldn't give to be in that situation! 



#20 Harry P.

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 01:31 PM

The ironic thing about making the switch from creating a brochure, for example, by sticking type down on illustration boards and making "keylines" and overlays on acetate sheets, etc. vs. creating the same piece today in Illustrator or InDesign is that while I was making the switch over to the digital world, I fought it all the way.... now I can't believe how much easier it is to create that same print piece electronically... and just how labor-intensive the "old ways" were.

 

But then again, client deadlines were a lot easier to deal with, because people knew it took time to do the work. Nowadays, clients think that all you have to do is hit a few letters on your keyboard and the stuff just magically appears... and they've shortened up their deadlines. Everybody wants everything immediately.    :rolleyes: