Jump to content


Police Car Question


  • You cannot reply to this topic
36 replies to this topic

#1 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 17 December 2012 - 06:07 AM

This is supposed to be on it's way to us.

 

Cool.  I like it !!

 

0-ford5.jpg

 

 

QUESTION:

 

In real life, how many two door police cars were actually used?

 

I guess the bad guy gets to ride shotgun. !!?!?!

.

.

.



#2 Danno

Danno

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,831 posts
  • Location:Okay. By now you all know ~ Aridzona.
  • Full Name:Nameless Natural Luminary

Posted 17 December 2012 - 06:16 AM

Jim,

 

In the earlier days, there were more 2-door police cars than 4-door police cars.  They were cheaper and officer safety in the event of a prisoner transport had not yet become a big concern.  It wasn't until the 60's that 4-door sedans became more common in law enforcement service. 

 

Paddy wagons were still very common, so prisoners in cities were usually transported in the back of the big van.

And, yes.  If a bad guy was to be hauled in where a paddy wagon wasn't available, he/she would usually be carried in the front passenger seat.  They just weren't allowed to drive!

 

The '57 Ford 300 was very popular in law enforcement in its day.  This should prove to be a huge seller.

 

 

B)



#3 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 17 December 2012 - 06:21 AM

Jim,

 

In the earlier days, there were more 2-door police cars than 4-door police cars.  They were cheaper and officer safety in the event of a prisoner transport had not yet become a big concern.  It wasn't until the 60's that 4-door sedans became more common in law enforcement service. 

 

Paddy wagons were still very common, so prisoners in cities were usually transported in the back of the big van.

And, yes.  If a bad guy was to be hauled in where a paddy wagon wasn't available, he/she would usually be carried in the front passenger seat.  They just weren't allowed to drive!

 

The '57 Ford 300 was very popular in law enforcement in its day.  This should prove to be a huge seller.

 

 

B)

Thank you Dan !!

 

I knew you would know.  Or is that, I knew you knew.  Or, you knew I knew you would know.  Or.................

.

.

.



#4 Danno

Danno

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,831 posts
  • Location:Okay. By now you all know ~ Aridzona.
  • Full Name:Nameless Natural Luminary

Posted 17 December 2012 - 06:34 AM

Not a problem, Jim.

 

 

By the way ... Happy Birthday! (a day or so late). 

 

Glad to see you're staying just ahead of me.  This is one thing I wouldn't want to catch up on.  ;)

 

 

B)



#5 Scuderia

Scuderia

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,504 posts
  • Location:Michigan
  • Full Name:Lawrence Greene

Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:01 AM

Anyone know if this new or if it's an updated re-release?

#6 Terry Sumner

Terry Sumner

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,456 posts
  • Location:Connecticut
  • Full Name:Terry Sumner Sr.

Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:01 AM

Just to give you a little more info on the prisoner transport part...here in Connecticut, we in the Connecticut State Police always have and still do transport our prisoners right in the front seat next to us. The reasons are a few...  each trooper is assigned a cruiser that he/she operates 24/7/365, on duty and off duty. Our cruisers are not marked by paint. The only marking on them is when we attach the roof rack every day upon returning to duty. The rack attaches to the roof with a cam release/attach lever or a screw into a pre mounted bracket and the wiring is via a 10 pin socket. Our cruisers have no barrier between the front and rear seats. So, all prisoners are handcuffed behind their backs and placed in the right front seat and then seat belted in.  Makes it a lot easier to watch them this way.



#7 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:48 AM

Anyone know if this new or if it's an updated re-release?

 

This kit will be put out by Model King and is based on the new Revell 57 Ford.  Model King is adding police items to the kit. 

 

It is expected to be released in early 2013.



#8 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:51 AM

Not a problem, Jim.

 

 

By the way ... Happy Birthday! (a day or so late). 

 

Glad to see you're staying just ahead of me.  This is one thing I wouldn't want to catch up on.  ;)

 

 

B)

 

Thanks.

 

So if I can go into a cryogenic state for a while, then you will catch up.

.

.

.

.



#9 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,417 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:02 AM

Just to give you a little more info on the prisoner transport part...here in Connecticut, we in the Connecticut State Police always have and still do transport our prisoners right in the front seat next to us. The reasons are a few...  each trooper is assigned a cruiser that he/she operates 24/7/365, on duty and off duty. Our cruisers are not marked by paint. The only marking on them is when we attach the roof rack every day upon returning to duty. The rack attaches to the roof with a cam release/attach lever or a screw into a pre mounted bracket and the wiring is via a 10 pin socket. Our cruisers have no barrier between the front and rear seats. So, all prisoners are handcuffed behind their backs and placed in the right front seat and then seat belted in.  Makes it a lot easier to watch them this way.

 

I'm no cop, but logic would tell me that transporting a prisoner in the back seat, handcuffed and behind a shield, where it's impossible for him to have any physical contact with you, would be a lot safer than having him sitting right next to you. Just sayin'...



#10 Zarana-X

Zarana-X

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 546 posts
  • Location:Yucaipa, CA
  • Full Name:Jason Smith

Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:08 AM

 

I'm no cop, but logic would tell me that transporting a prisoner in the back seat, handcuffed and behind a shield, where it's impossible for him to have any physical contact with you, would be a lot safer than having him sitting right next to you. Just sayin'...

 Sounds like Connecticut has alot of faith in the honor system.



#11 Jim B

Jim B

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,464 posts
  • Location:Chittenango, NY
  • Full Name:James Bongiovanni

Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:57 AM

I'm not "up" on 1950s cards, but isn't this a Ford Mainline?



#12 Danno

Danno

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,831 posts
  • Location:Okay. By now you all know ~ Aridzona.
  • Full Name:Nameless Natural Luminary

Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:18 AM

I'm not "up" on 1950s cards, but isn't this a Ford Mainline?

 

 

 

Nope.  Ford didn't use the "Mainline" name in 1957. 

 

 

B)



#13 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:19 AM

I'm not "up" on 1950s cards, but isn't this a Ford Mainline?

 

No.  But I'll bet Danno "mainlines" a few of these kits............

.

.

.



#14 Dr. Cranky

Dr. Cranky

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,356 posts
  • Location:Transylvania, Florida
  • Full Name:Virgil "Doctor Cranky" Suarez

Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:28 AM

I just want to know what Hollywood is cooking, now that he's turned another birthday.  Happy birthday!



#15 Danno

Danno

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,831 posts
  • Location:Okay. By now you all know ~ Aridzona.
  • Full Name:Nameless Natural Luminary

Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:03 PM

 

No.  But I'll bet Danno "mainlines" a few of these kits............

.

.

.

 

 

 

LOL.  Probably . . .

 

 

:lol:  :lol:



#16 Mercman

Mercman

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,062 posts
  • Location:Fargo ND
  • Full Name:Junior

Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:57 PM

In Fargo here back in the 60's they still had 2 door cruiser's. My dad would come home in one for supper. He was a cop here for 33 years.



#17 Jim B

Jim B

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,464 posts
  • Location:Chittenango, NY
  • Full Name:James Bongiovanni

Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:17 PM

But this is supposed to be a 1957.



#18 Art Anderson

Art Anderson

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,681 posts

Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:22 PM

This is supposed to be on it's way to us.

 

Cool.  I like it !!

 

0-ford5.jpg

 

 

QUESTION:

 

In real life, how many two door police cars were actually used?

 

I guess the bad guy gets to ride shotgun. !!?!?!

.

.

.

Yes, 2drs were far more common than 4drs decades ago.  Indiana State Police used 2dr sedans in the more rural parts of IN until the early 1960's.

 

Art



#19 Agent G

Agent G

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,506 posts
  • Location:Las Vegas
  • Full Name:Wayne Gray

Posted 17 December 2012 - 02:55 PM

The St. Louis Metropolitan Police used two door cars until the 1959 model year.  Even then, the first of the four doors were assigned to the Canine Division.

 

Efficient and safe prisoner transportation has been, and always will be, a topic for discussion.

 

From the first "Black Maria" to the most modern police vehicle, conveying someone who doesn't want to go, has been and will be, a challenge.

 

G



#20 2000-cvpi

2000-cvpi

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 557 posts
  • Location:Kalamazoo, Michigan
  • Full Name:Corey Sarenius

Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:12 PM

 
I'm no cop, but logic would tell me that transporting a prisoner in the back seat, handcuffed and behind a shield, where it's impossible for him to have any physical contact with you, would be a lot safer than having him sitting right next to you. Just sayin'...

But in the front seat you can hit the bad guy with a sap to quiet him or her down.