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Another Super 7

True Scratch-building Brass & Aluminum Machining Casting

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#301 Scale-Master

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 12:17 PM

Thanks guys!

 

More progress on the frame… This section plugs into the rear of the main frame.

DSC02036_zpsd5437011.jpg

…as well as fine tuning the fit of the body to the frame.

DSC02037_zps53e875c1.jpg



#302 Scale-Master

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:24 PM

I made the motor mounts and soldered them to the frame.  They are made of brass rod and acid etched brass sheet.  Also added the cross member for the trans mounting point.

DSC02040_zps40c56c45.jpg

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#303 Harry P.

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:48 PM

Ok, possibly a stupid question, but here goes anyway.

 

You could have built the chassis using styrene stock. Probably easier, faster, etc. Is there a particular reason that you go the brass/solder route instead? I'm curious, because if if it was me, I'd definitely have gone with styrene and liquid cement vs. brass and solder, because once it's panted, you can never tell the difference.

 

Is working with brass a personal preference for you? Just curious, because like I said, the same results (visually) could have been achieved via a much easier technique, and the end result would have been indistinguishable.



#304 Mooneyzs

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:18 PM

Mark... Nice work on the chassis and motor mounts. It looks great. I think may of asked you this already but what style of solder Iron are you using... Pencil, gun or resistance solder iron? I had some trouble last night with something compared to your chassis would be simple but when I had heated my area to solder I got the rest of it too hot and had joints on the other end shift since it got hot enough for that solder joint to melt. Anyway just trying to better learn better soldering tricks lol

#305 Scale-Master

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:45 PM

Harry,

No, this project would not work with styrene.  A Tamiya kit has a nearly one piece molded ABS frame.   A glued together styrene one would fail when coupled with the other plans I have for this.

I choose the materials I think will work best for the application(s).  For the quality I am striving for, brass is a far better choice than styrene. I have worked with both materials, (there is a reason so many people use brass for this type of model making).  In the long run the use of brass will provide a more stable and stronger chassis that will result in less repair work than one made of styrene.  That equates to less time.  Plus in order to mount the other metal parts to it, I need the strength.  Right off the bat I can guarantee styrene would not be strong enough to make the motor mounts I made today work. 

If I took the approach that since you can’t tell what it is made of once it is done so I can make it cheaper or easier, my models would not look or last the way they do.

 

Chris,

I am using a butane pencil type, resistance and a torch.

 

 



#306 Harry P.

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:51 PM

Hmmm, interesting.

 

I don't agree with your logic, but I can understand your viewpoint. And I wasn't trying to shoot down your choices, just wanted to hear why... which I did, so thanks! 



#307 Chas SCR

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 04:47 PM

Harry, I think it's when the traveling to the shows start is what Mark is trying to say on upkeep for a project like this. I maybe wrong but seems that the couple of cars that I have done in styrene would have been better off if I learn to use brass for the repair or even keeping it together with out having to worry about repairs.



#308 Scale-Master

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 05:23 PM

Yes, that is a significant part of it Chas. I have seen several models reduced to rubble from travel, (one poorly engineered example supposedly shook itself apart on a drive down the 405...)

But over time styrene can sag too, just sitting in the showcase, especially when encumbered with other heavier (metal) parts. I found that out the hard way...

But the real concern for me is the inherent rigidity and predictability that brass provides for a long term build.  I know the metal parts I make this year will still fit next year or later.  Plus soldered brass is far stronger than glued plastic.  Build a strong core/infrastructure…, even if it seems like it takes longer it really doesn’t in the grand scheme (if you do it right...). 



#309 vintagedragfan

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 01:25 AM

that is some beautiful craftsmanship Mark! starting to look like a chassis, the brass work certainly is a lot more challenging (for me at least) I am looking forward to seeing it at the GSL! I did manage to fit the cuda in my carry on case, so I will have it there as well, again fantastic work



#310 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 02:20 AM

Always a pleasure to tune into this one and see the progress.



#311 blunc

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:35 AM

Always a pleasure to tune into this one and see the progress.

I concur. :)



#312 BMX Addicts

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 03:40 AM

AWESOME!!!!....   



#313 Chas SCR

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:16 AM

Great detail work as always Mark, can not wait to see you and your dad in a few weeks and learn from you more!



#314 Scale-Master

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 02:51 PM

With the engine secured into the frame, I decided to make the header.  Brass, solder, steel and styrene, (I made the flange while I was building the head).

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The collector is just brass pieces soldered together.

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It is a press fit to the header.

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#315 simonr

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:03 PM

Mark, do we'll see this at the upcoming GSL?

 

 

Simón P. Rivera Torres



#316 Harry P.

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:11 PM

I wasn't slamming Mark's methods, just asking why.

 

I agree, obviously a soldered brass chassis is stronger than a glued plastic one. But I don't buy the argument that the strength of brass is needed for a model's structural integrity. It's a model... it weighs a few ounces. Nobody is going to ride on it or use it to hold up a wobbly table. I have many 1/8 scale models that are all plastic... built many years ago and still perfectly fine. No sag.

 

I can see using brass as a personal choice; I'm not questioning that. In fact I'm impressed by Mark's craftsmanship and skill. He knows that. I'm just not buying the argument that it's needed.  ;) 



#317 Scale-Master

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:28 PM

Simon,

Yes I will have some of the parts with me.

 

Harry,

These Sevens (with the metal I add) weigh in at significantly more than a few ounces, one of them is well over a pound, this one is likely to outweigh it.  I don't think you were aware of that.  And I do appreciate the compliments, from everyone.



#318 Harry P.

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:33 PM

Exactly. You create your own problem by adding weight using brass!

 

(don't worry... I'm just yanking your chain)...  :P



#319 Scale-Master

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:45 PM

I know you're joking, but the "over pounder" has an ABS frame. It holds it, (with metal reinforcement), but a styrene multi-piece frame would have certainly had problems, if not during construction, definitely over the years on the shelf.



#320 Harry P.

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:55 PM

"Over pounder?"

 

You want fries with that?

 

:lol: