Jump to content


3-D Printing is now affordable


  • You cannot reply to this topic
159 replies to this topic

#21 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,663 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:00 PM

I can see model kits being sold online in a downloadable file, and printed at home.

 

That's exactly where I see this going. There will be a whole new crop of model kit "manufacturers" that will sell you a kit in printable form... all you do is buy the "kit" and print it out. No more injection molding machines, no more tooling, no more factories, no more packaging and distribution.

 

The music industry is almost there. It went from a physical product (first records, then tapes, then CDs) that had to be manufactured and packaged and shipped and warehoused and sold in brick and mortar stores, to where we are now... downloadable electronic files. Every year, CD sales are falling and music downloads are growing. Soon CDs will be relics of the past. I've read that auto manufacturers are already phasing out in-dash CD players.

 

The newspaper industry is going the same way. Every day, a newspaper goes out of business. Why bother with giant printing plants and huge rolls of paper and hundreds of trucks delivering the paper to hundreds of locations when you can do it all online a lot easier and a lot faster, and save a ton of money, too? It's a no-brainer.

 

I see the model car business going exactly the same way. Why bother with machines and factories and packaging and shipping and inventory when you can do it all electronically and eliminate all of that stuff?

 

It's inevitable. The only question is how soon will it happen.



#22 Lownslow

Lownslow

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,841 posts
  • Location:West Side Chicago
  • Full Name:Frank Rizzo

Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:16 PM

There will no doubt be all sorts of easy "do it yourself" 3D software coming, maybe even in a package with the printers.

Sketchup is probably the best option out, Blender as well. 



#23 Edsel-Dan

Edsel-Dan

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,388 posts
  • Location:Pocomoke, Maryland
  • Full Name:Daniel Lee Gunter

Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:25 PM

Talk to friends into Paper models, they use Several 3D programs Pepakura, Metasequoia, Blender & Anim8tor

are 4 I know of

 

Just "Search" 3D drawing and you will find Many already out there.

 

I Build and Collect Paper Models along side Plastic & diecast, but do not Design they yet.

I have a few  of the 3d freeware software programs on my PC too.

Pep, Anim8tor & Blender are in my Paper Models folder along with a few 2d drawing programs



#24 charlie8575

charlie8575

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,628 posts
  • Location:Marlborough, Ma.
  • Full Name:Charlie

Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:27 PM

I wonder if some program can be used to take a picture from a photo CD, and then convert the picture into whatever the printer wants to use?

 

I've tried CAD before, and wanted to throw the computer out the window. The most infuriating thing I ever tried aside from attempting to use one of my friend's so-called "smart" phones.

 

I'm personally waiting for a CAD drafting board that acts like a pencil and paper one. When those come out, I'll give it another try.

 

Charlie Larkin



#25 martinfan5

martinfan5

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,367 posts
  • Location:Los Santos, San Andreas
  • Full Name:Jonathan Stephens

Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:57 PM

There will no doubt be all sorts of easy "do it yourself" 3D software coming, maybe even in a package with the printers.

I would be more shocked if that did not happen.

 

I know alot of people wont want to agree with this, but this could be a very good thing for the model industry as a whole, how much money they will save, and all that savings can be used , well I was going to say tool up new kits, but rather desgin new kits, frees up more money for licensing cost, and so on

 

The only down side with down-loadable kits, is having plastic tires,  I like having rubber tires, so that is one issue I can think of already,  I am not going to guess, but I dont think we will see down-loadable kits anytime soon though,  I am going to guess, 3D printing is going to have to become just as mainstream as ink printing, so its going to take awhile, but I am just guessing like the rest of us



#26 Lownslow

Lownslow

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,841 posts
  • Location:West Side Chicago
  • Full Name:Frank Rizzo

Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:59 PM

I would be more shocked if that did not happen.

 

I know alot of people wont want to agree with this, but this could be a very good thing for the model industry as a whole, how much money they will save, and all that savings can be used , well I was going to say tool up new kits, but rather desgin new kits, frees up more money for licensing cost, and so on

 

The only down side with down-loadable kits, is having plastic tires,  I like having rubber tires, so that is one issue I can think of already,  I am not going to guess, but I dont think we will see down-loadable kits anytime soon though,  I am going to guess, 3D printing is going to have to become just as mainstream as ink printing, so its going to take awhile, but I am just guessing like the rest of us

actually theres soft compound material thats available but still in its early stages.



#27 Jantrix

Jantrix

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,385 posts
  • Location:Tampa, FL. USA
  • Full Name:Rob Mattis

Posted 16 January 2013 - 01:47 AM

Yep, trading parts will more likely be trading 3-D images.



#28 Foxer

Foxer

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,047 posts
  • Location:The Berkshires, Massachusetts
  • Full Name:Mike DeRagon

Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:25 AM

The printer uses ABS plastic so that seems like a close material to what we all know.

 

One thing is it prints solid objects and uses a web-like interior to save material. This is good for small part but bodies would seem to be out of the picture.



#29 Ace-Garageguy

Ace-Garageguy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,537 posts
  • Location:Down two, then left.
  • Full Name:Bill Engwer

Posted 16 January 2013 - 03:16 AM

Yup.



#30 Casey

Casey

    MCM Ohana

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,217 posts
  • Location:Milwaukee, WI
  • Full Name:Casey Littmann

Posted 16 January 2013 - 04:39 AM

One thing is it prints solid objects and uses a web-like interior to save material. This is good for small part but bodies would seem to be out of the picture.

 

As Frank mentioned, you can print a 1/25 scale body in sections if it doesn't fit within the printer's maximum printing area. And here we all thought multi-piece bodies died with Revell's '57 Ranchero and Monogram's 1/32 "Forty-niner" kits.  :D

 

I'm still believe 3D printing will compliment injection molding, rather than replace it. 50+ years of tooling won't be rendered obsolete, and the memories those injection molded kits evoke is a real, bankable selling point which 3D printing can't match.

 

Jonathan brought up a good point, too, mentioning the "non-plastic" parts a kit includes. Now, while I'm all for hard plastic tires, a decal sheet will not be as easy to print out for most of us, even though we've had the ability to do it ourselves for well over a decade. And how about chrome plating? Those parts'll need to be sent out to be chromed, as Alclad and the others still haven't been able to equal vacuum plating.



#31 High octane

High octane

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,967 posts
  • Location:Midwest
  • Full Name:Nick

Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:44 AM

I'm  a dinosaur and I'll stick with the kits in my stash and all my aftermarket parts that I already have. I don't need anymore stuff, just motivation to build what I have.



#32 Harry P.

Harry P.

    MCM Ohana

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,663 posts
  • Location:NW suburban Chicago
  • Full Name:A mere layman...

Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:49 AM

I'm  a dinosaur and I'll stick with the kits in my stash and all my aftermarket parts that I already have. I don't need anymore stuff, just motivation to build what I have.

 

You remember how the dinosaurs couldn't adapt to change and they all died out?

 

You don't want to be one of them...  :D



#33 sjordan2

sjordan2

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,813 posts
  • Location:Knoxville, TN
  • Full Name:Skip Jordan

Posted 16 January 2013 - 06:58 AM

I would expect to see an increasing number of print-to-order retail services that could offer larger printers and higher quality, using files from a number of sources, while affording to keep up with changing and improving technology (and keeping prices reasonable due to volume). In other words, more companies like Shapeways, with increasing capabilities. It will be interesting to see how such services deal with inevitable copyright questions.

 

I think home 3D printers will go through a series of fast-moving improvements in price and performance, and make early versions prone to becoming obsolete.



#34 2000-cvpi

2000-cvpi

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 580 posts
  • Location:Kalamazoo, Michigan
  • Full Name:Corey Sarenius

Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:11 AM

 
You remember how the dinosaurs couldn't adapt to change and they all died out?
 
You don't want to be one of them...  :D

Unfortunately a rather large part of the modelers in general are like dinosaurs. They are so unwilling to adapt.

This technology is going to change the hobby, for the better. No more paying large sums of money for a rare annual kit, just make it at home. The little obstacles like tires and chrome playing will get sorted out. The hardest majority of the technology has been done, the printer itself.

#35 Foxer

Foxer

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,047 posts
  • Location:The Berkshires, Massachusetts
  • Full Name:Mike DeRagon

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:22 AM

This technology is going to change the hobby, for the better. No more paying large sums of money for a rare annual kit, just make it at home. The little obstacles like tires and chrome playing will get sorted out. The hardest majority of the technology has been done, the printer itself.

 

Actually, the printer technology is the easy part! Where everyone will stumble is creating a 3D model. I've been using (not creating that much) 3D models since 1992 when 3D Studio came out. I've looked at making a car but never wanted to ride that learning curve. There are a number of people making 3D Car models and most currently sell for around $100. This is not a new thing and is a pretty established industry. So expect your 3D models to start at $100 plus printing.

 

Here's a site with 3D Auto meshes to see what's being created now. They would still need much massaging to use for 3D printing.  3d02.com



#36 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:32 AM

Unfortunately a rather large part of the modelers in general are like dinosaurs. They are so unwilling to adapt.

This technology is going to change the hobby, for the better. No more paying large sums of money for a rare annual kit, just make it at home. The little obstacles like tires and chrome playing will get sorted out. The hardest majority of the technology has been done, the printer itself.

 

 

caveman_dinosaur_hyperactive_653045.jpg

.

.

.



#37 Lownslow

Lownslow

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,841 posts
  • Location:West Side Chicago
  • Full Name:Frank Rizzo

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:32 AM

 

Actually, the printer technology is the easy part! Where everyone will stumble is creating a 3D model. I've been using (not creating that much) 3D models since 1992 when 3D Studio came out. I've looked at making a car but never wanted to ride that learning curve. There are a number of people making 3D Car models and most currently sell for around $100. This is not a new thing and is a pretty established industry. So expect your 3D models to start at $100 plus printing.

 

Here's a site with 3D Auto meshes to see what's being created now. They would still need much massaging to use for 3D printing.  3d02.com

its not as easy ive been working on making a 3d printable body out of one of those for almost a month if it wasnt for NormL helping me out i wouldve gave up by now.



#38 johnbuzzed

johnbuzzed

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,242 posts
  • Location:Indian Land, SC
  • Full Name:John "the Buzzard" Buzzerio

Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:52 AM

Hey, the dinosaurs were around for millions of years - not too shabby for a bunch of small-brained creatures.  I, too, feel like one of them.  I'll welcome the aftermarket items that will be available via 3-D printing but I'll still want to open that sealed kit box and get that rush of fresh styrene.  It is said that the sense of smell is the most evocative and I pretty much agree with that line of thought.



#39 Darren B

Darren B

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,230 posts
  • Location:Turkey Town, NM
  • Full Name:Darren B.

Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

I believe model kits will be around for many years to come and i hope so cause i too like the thrill of opening up a brand new model kit, plus alot of the printing of the 3-d parts are fairly rough so making a body would be fine but it would require a lot of sanding to make it smooth, not sure about the new printers but what i have seen printed in the past there pretty rough up close. I'm gonna purchase the 6"x6"x6" version to make parts, valve covers, blowers, turbos, small parts until I learn all the ins and outs then ill move up to a larger one some day. I just think its a really cool process, yes you have to learn a program (I downloaded sketchup from google free and already doing simple shapes) but after that scratchbuilding will be a hole lot easier.


Edited by Darren B, 16 January 2013 - 02:39 PM.


#40 sportandmiah

sportandmiah

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 557 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Full Name:Arnold Jackson

Posted 16 January 2013 - 03:50 PM

Any pictures of parts or cars made? I would like to see the quality.