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3-D Printing is now affordable


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#141 Modelbuilder Mark

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:26 PM

My question still stands, if I want to make a part/piece that is new, NOT a scan/replica of an existing part, would I not have to have some drafting skills to create the "master" that the printer would work from? 



#142 Henchmen4Hire

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:01 PM

It's not that hard to make 3D models guys. I learned to make models for video games in like a day, just by watching free tutorials of varying quality online. After a week I was already comfortable experimenting on my own and have made lots of cool models since.

 

You're simply moving around a bunch of dots (vertices) to get the shapes you want, the more dots you use the more detailed the model can be. Whatever 3D modeling program you use makes the process easier by letting you create shapes, lines, bends, curves, extrusions, etc. You can even set up a blueprint in the program (pictures/drawings from different angles of the object) and use it for reference as you make the model, so it's not like you have to use a ruler and measure every little thing in real life.

 

I don't know what other steps you have to take to get the printer to recognize a model, but I imagine the kind of model needed would have to be sculpted in something like Zbrush, something with tons and tons of polygons/vertices (high-resolution, or whatever the term is). But again, it's not hard to learn, provided you have a good teacher and the money to keep paying for the classes haha. Good luck with those outrageous prices...


Edited by Henchmen4Hire, 12 March 2013 - 08:03 PM.


#143 Chas SCR

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:09 PM

@ Mark, yes you would have to know how to draw it basic blue print reading style and know what you are trying to do by taking it from your head and putting it into the computer and scaling it to work. Here are three pics from start to complete that I did for a test part.

 

 

 

154145_4848105654302_450705621_n.jpg484755_4848105574300_698288309_n.jpg208242_4848105774305_289709977_n.jpg



#144 Modelbuilder Mark

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:23 PM

@Chas

 

Thanks, that is what I was thinking may be the case. That may be what would make it the most out of reach for most people who build models casually or for fun. Not the eventual expense or access of the tools. 



#145 Henchmen4Hire

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 05:21 AM

That may be what would make it the most out of reach for most people who build models casually or for fun.

 

It really shouldn't though, for example you can make that rim in like 5 minutes or less using basic shapes (a cylinder, a 6-sided polygon, some insetting and scaling). Scaling an object to the right size is a one click operation, you can even type in exact dimensions.

 

Give it a shot everybody, who better to learn how to make 3D-printable models of car parts than model builders?



#146 johnbuzzed

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:03 AM

I think that 3D printing will start off with some cottage industries first but I don't think it will be a hit with the larger corporations too soon- think of all of the retooling that would be involved, along with the time involved in the production of a single part.  It doesn't seem to me to be very cost-effective.   As far as home use, the abilities to design and produce parts with 3D printers will be the same as with any other somewhat complex tools.  Not everyone can be a whiz with a lathe, end mill or even an airbrush on their first attempts- stuff like this will take practice.  I don't think I'll ever get a 3D printer for my personal use but I would most certainly use parts produced thru the use of one.

 

Along the ST train of thought, one of my co-workers just used the term "universal translator" in describing a piece of equipment that we use here.  Reality does follow fiction... :blink:



#147 ajwheels

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 06:18 AM

 

Give it a shot everybody, who better to learn how to make 3D-printable models of car parts than model builders?

Until scanners get really good..........and a whole lot cheaper.............one still needs that CAD source file to print from..................but the CAD tools are getting more user-friendly all the time, and a number of them are free online, and the learning curve is a lot less steep these days...................also, lots of tutorials out there as well...............

 

As Henchmen said, give it a shot............you may find you have a knack for it, and then you will never look at a model kit in the same way again.............the sky's the limit...............

 

Tony



#148 NormL

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 07:40 AM

Scanners are good, it is the software that needs to improve for the creation of parametric models from point clouds.  Coming from clouds to models is much harder than modeling in 3D ...



#149 Rob Hall

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

Our Makerbot Replicator 2 showed up at the office this afternoon...



#150 Lownslow

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 07:06 PM

Our Makerbot Replicator 2 showed up at the office this afternoon...

You gonna make some stuff post pics if you do ive eyed the machine before but something puts me off about extrusion printing.



#151 CrazyGirl

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 07:28 PM

whats a 3D printer and plastic do ?? i am confussed here ,, i still have a hard time with a simple printer and turning my computer on and off lol and dont get me started on the cell phones ,,, ugggggggg



#152 Lownslow

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 07:41 PM

whats a 3D printer and plastic do ?? i am confussed here ,, i still have a hard time with a simple printer and turning my computer on and off lol and dont get me started on the cell phones ,,, ugggggggg



#153 CrazyGirl

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 01:48 AM

omg this is amazing  and it's not all that much money when you think about it  , i remember in 1985 spending 3500 dollars for a junky computer, i just wonder how small of a part you can make , like could it make a carburetor you think ?



#154 NormL

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 04:38 AM

I printed this at Shapeways.com

 

 

It truly is just amazing technology, I got the bolts on the tops of the wheels to show up


Edited by NormL, 15 March 2013 - 04:46 AM.


#155 DirtModeler

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 11:21 AM

CEO of Autodesk talking about 3D printing @home.

 

http://www.popsci.co...d-printing-home



#156 Dave Ambrose

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 01:47 PM

I saw this 3D printer earlier this week in Austin. The parts coming out of it in fine mode are impressive indeed. We're very close to something that can make parts or resin casing masters without a lot of post printing prep work.



#157 Modelbuilder Mark

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 02:38 PM

one thing I do not recall seeing in this thread, will my Tenax and other liquid glues join these parts to normal styrene?


Edited by Modelbuilder Mark, 15 March 2013 - 02:39 PM.


#158 GrandpaMcGurk

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 04:28 AM

one thing I do not recall seeing in this thread, will my Tenax and other liquid glues join these parts to normal styrene?

 

Solvents, MEK, tube glues etc. won't work effectively.......they have little or no effect on the printed materials............Use CA.



#159 GrandpaMcGurk

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 06:21 AM

There's been a lot of talk and speculation in this thread about desktop 3-D printing.

While it's true that the costs are coming down and more than likely will continue to do so.....there's one very important thing to keep in mind, the equipment and the material is only one side of the coin. On the other side....(in layman's terms) it's just a tool.

If you use a pair of vice grips to change your spark plugs the end result will be obvious. In other words......the machines regardless of cost will only do what you tell them to.

If you put in poor info you will have a nicely printed poor part.

Get my drift?  

I read somewhere that they were going to or have already sent a printing machine into space.........think about it, instead of having to send a shuttle with a plastic part into space (how's that for costly) they just send the info to the machine and it prints out a ready to use plastic air valve or whatever to replace the broken one.

So for you guys think think 3-D printing is going to fade away anytime soon...think again....it's just going to get better and more affordable. 


Edited by GrandpaMcGurk, 16 March 2013 - 06:23 AM.


#160 CadillacPat

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 10:22 AM

I don't see anyone having said it would "fade away", in fact just the opposite.  It will take a long time for it to fade into use for replacing injection molded Models, if to any tiny degree.

What many of us have stated is that ease of use will be the main issue.

Add that to cost of material, quality of parts, time it takes to make parts, machine cost, etc., and you can see how only a fraction of Modelers will ever be using these.

UNTIL,

Just like the ease of PhotoShop, one is able to simply open an image and click the Mouse one time, just like Star Trek.

 

Way too many boxes of Models remain available and will for a long long time to fill the majority's needs.

Just like those who make professional Decals, look how many there ever were, only a handful, and look how many are current, only a couple.

 

CadillacPat