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Createx Wicked Colors Paint Questions


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#41 Skip

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 03:49 AM

Spraying acrylic paints is sort of a learning curve for those of us who have sprayed toxic anything onto our models and other stuff for years.

Lacquer used to be kind of fun until the "lacquer buzz" turned into the "lacquer headache"! One of the automotive Art magazines I subscribe to has a monthly column on materials safety, seems a whole lot of us Old farts are getting sensitized to the chemicals we've used for many years. I've been pretty careful over the years, I got laughed at once or twice for wearing respirators while painting even with rattle cans, I've had a Paasche spray booth for a long time. I've noticed the weird side effects of using many of the paints was lessened just by using a few simple safety items and techniques some as easy as reading labels.

#42 Jon Haigwood

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 07:13 AM

If you look on youtube for AutoAir (same people that make Wicked colors) paint tips there on video.

http://www.youtube.c...DesignsAirbrush

#43 trapper

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Posted 26 March 2015 - 10:17 PM

Hello everybody, Iam just wondering if anyone has used wicked colors airbrush paints? If so, what did you think? Iam thinking about trying them but I would like to know what they are like first. Any help would be great, Thanks.



#44 Chief Joseph

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 04:37 AM

They work well.  To see some past discussions, copy & paste this line into Google or your browser address bar:

 

site:modelcarsmag.com wicked colors

 

They are water-borne, so they don't adhere to bare plastic like good old enamel or lacquer.  Bare plastic should either be primed or cleaned really well and scuffed.  The paint works straight out of the bottle with a large-ish airbrush nozzle and lots of air pressure, or you can reduce it to work with smaller airbrushes and lower air pressure.  Don't thin them with water-- only use the Wicked or Auto-Air reducers.  They go on either satin-like or matte ("detail" colors), and should be top-coated with a clear if you are painting a body.  Just about any clearcoat will work over them.



#45 fseva

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 12:29 PM

They are water-borne, so they don't adhere to bare plastic like good old enamel or lacquer.  Bare plastic should either be primed or cleaned really well and scuffed.  The paint works straight out of the bottle with a large-ish airbrush nozzle and lots of air pressure, or you can reduce it to work with smaller airbrushes and lower air pressure.  Don't thin them with water-- only use the Wicked or Auto-Air reducers.  They go on either satin-like or matte ("detail" colors), and should be top-coated with a clear if you are painting a body.  Just about any clearcoat will work over them.

 

The Auto-Borne colors use some solvent so that they flow better - I find they make nice paints for interiors because they generally turn out flat or satin. I have tried airbrushing Wicked colors, but the concept of reducing with a specific amount of reducer is so foreign to me, I stopped trying. I have no problem reducing my lacquers with just about any amount of thinner I want... in fact, it seems the thinner a lacquer is, the farther it goes. However, that doesn't apply to all lacquers. Alclad Polished Aluminum is very thin, but does not go very far. So, it may actually be thinned too much so that the company makes a better profit.