Jump to content


How to "dry" assemble?


  • You cannot reply to this topic
14 replies to this topic

#1 brodie_83

brodie_83

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts
  • Location:Duluth, MN
  • Full Name:Brodie Nyrud

Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:30 AM

Just wondering how people are "dry" assembling their models for test-fitting parts. I have a kit that i want to test fit parts to see what the out-of-the-box ride height is. Is there a way to temporarily assemble a kit, say with Elmers white glue?

#2 Jantrix

Jantrix

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,148 posts
  • Location:Tampa, FL. USA
  • Full Name:Rob Mattis

Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:38 AM

Yep, that's the ticket. Alene's Tacky Glue is also good.



#3 JunkPile

JunkPile

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • Location:Kansas, USA
  • Full Name:Chuck Saxton

Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:46 AM

Small dabs of super glue is way faster than white glue.  Snaps right apart



#4 Foxer

Foxer

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,741 posts
  • Location:The Berkshires, Massachusetts
  • Full Name:Mike DeRagon

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:26 AM

Many do use Elmer's glue to test fit because it's removable with water. I use Microscale Micro Liquitape as it remains tacky and the parts can be taken apart and restuck.



#5 Ace-Garageguy

Ace-Garageguy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,702 posts
  • Location:Down two, then left.
  • Full Name:Bill Engwer

Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:39 AM

My $.02...I hack and modify everything, so to me it all depends on what parts I'm mocking up, and what materials I'm using.

 

 I'll often use just a touch of liquid cement to hold things together while I'm working out styling changes or suspension mods to hit the stance I want, and a Touch-N-Flow applicator is great for getting just a drop exactly where you want it. Too much, and you'll damage the parts when you take it apart.

 

White glue can be helpful if you're closer to final assembly and have time to let it dry (it's not fast-dry and things have to be held exactly in position while you wait)  It's not water-soluable once it's fully dry however, so you'll have to scrape it off with a fingernail.

 

I also often use rubber cement to hold things temporarily as well. 

 

If you're mocking up resin parts, CA is usually necessary...again, just a drop. Liquid plastic glue will also stick styrene to resin for a mockup.



#6 Tom Geiger

Tom Geiger

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,099 posts
  • Location:Exton, PA
  • Full Name:Tom Geiger

Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:59 PM

MVC003S-vi.jpg

 

One of the pros showed me how he built his models. He designed the entire thing to assemble by pin or press fit.  He then could assemble the entire model and then take it apart to paint all the parts.  I do a lot of this now, note how this engine goes together. As an additional benefit, once you glue it together with bits of straight pin, it's not falling apart!



#7 Danno

Danno

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,486 posts
  • Location:Feenicks
  • Full Name:Nameless Natural Luminary

Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:20 PM

I'm with TomG. 
 
I pin as much as I can.
 
 
B)

 



#8 sportandmiah

sportandmiah

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 557 posts
  • Location:USA
  • Full Name:Arnold Jackson

Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:05 PM

I really like the pin idea. I've never seen that before..can't wait to try it.

#9 phantomw

phantomw

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Location:Gainesville FL
  • Full Name:Val Quintana

Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:15 PM

I used pins and very little C.G

#10 Tom Geiger

Tom Geiger

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,099 posts
  • Location:Exton, PA
  • Full Name:Tom Geiger

Posted 30 January 2013 - 06:40 PM

MVC002F-vi.jpg

 

Here's another photo of the pin method. Look at the two mirrors. They are both just sitting on straight pins in this photo. I drilled the holes prior to paint to avoid mishap with my paint job. If you look through the interior, you can see the pin on the passenger side.  Once you figure out the length, just clip the straight pin down to size. Then you can glue it from inside the body. No chance of glue showing on your paint job!  I do this with door handles too.  And they'll never ever accidently come off!

 

In fact on this model I never did glue the pins. They're just holding the mirrors in place.  This truck was the box art model for the Model King '79 Ford pickup kit.  I was afraid that the mirrors and other accessories would fall off while being mailed around, so I left them off for the photographer to put on for the photo shoot. 

 

MVC002F-vi.jpg

 

Also I wasn't sure what accessories they'd want to photograph so every thing can go on or off. The front brush bar is on pins and the bed cover is just sitting in place. Note that the mirror isn't on in this photo.

 

MVC003F-vi.jpg

 

And here it is with the roll bar pinned into the bed. See the mirror is in place in this photo.



#11 jaymcminn

jaymcminn

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 668 posts
  • Location:Naples, FL
  • Full Name:Jason McMinn

Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:35 PM

I do a little of everything to mock up my models. I'll pin parts,  make brackets and mounting points for major subassemblies out of styrene, and use white glue to mock up suspensions for the perfect stance. I usually use Micro Kristal Klear for this... it's thicker and dries quicker than ordinary white glue and is still water soluble. 



#12 iceman-555

iceman-555

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • Location:Far West Texas
  • Full Name:Joel

Posted 22 April 2015 - 12:35 PM

I saw this thread referenced in another one.  Are there regular pins or thin metal rods?



#13 Art Anderson

Art Anderson

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,641 posts

Posted 22 April 2015 - 01:50 PM

 

I'm with TomG. 
 
I pin as much as I can.
 
 
B)

 

 

I've taken to drilling and pinning just about everything I can--I simply use K&S .020" brass rod and a #76 drill in my pin vise.  A suggestion when using brass rod--when you cut it, take the time to "dress" off the cut ends with some 400-grit sandpaper--yes it can be tedious--but it does make the whole process a lot easier come assembly time.

 

Art



#14 Russell C

Russell C

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Full Name:Russell Cook

Posted 22 April 2015 - 07:10 PM

I saw this thread referenced in another one.  Are there regular pins or thin metal rods?

 

Pins can be pretty much any round 'rod material' under the sun, as long as you have a corresponding drill bit to match the diameter. Paper clip wire, used staples, heat stretched plastic sprue, etc.  For years, I've been using mostly some old cloth-insulated copper coil wire I found in a discarded electrical thing, the insulation comes off easily and it is nicely bendable.



#15 afx

afx

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,741 posts
  • Location:Crownsville, MD
  • Full Name:JC Reckner

Posted 23 April 2015 - 12:45 AM

I'm with Art my favorite pinning rod is the K&S .020 brass rod, very thin but very strong. I also bought a variety pack of straight pins that included several different sizes (gauge).  This pack will out live me and my building career.  If you pre-assemble your sub assemblies and ad  pin mounting you can almost dry fit the entire model before you painted a thing. 

 

DSCN2341-vi.jpg

 

Various size styrene rod is also a good pinning choice.  I cut of the short little stub that is cast into the part and add a larger and longer piece of rod. Here I have extended the pin using styrene rod.

 

DSCN2570-vi.jpg

 

Here I have replaced the cast in mounting pin on the shift lever.

 

DSCN2548-vi.jpg

 

And like Bill. I love my Touch-n-Flow applicator and liquid cement. I don't use for temporary assembly like Bill but I find it it is a fantastic tool for permanent work.