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#1 rcdave

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:12 PM

If I spray 2 coats of blue and think it's too dark can I spray a coat or 2 of white and then more blue. Will it brighten up the blue? If so any tips?

#2 Chas SCR

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:18 PM

What blue are you starting with? if it's a normal blue then the answer is no. They have to be mixed and can not be put over each other to get the same effect as if you did red over yellow to change the hue # if that is what you are asking.



#3 rcdave

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:12 PM

What blue are you starting with? if it's a normal blue then the answer is no. They have to be mixed and can not be put over each other to get the same effect as if you did red over yellow to change the hue # if that is what you are asking.


Tamiya Mica Blue is the paint. I didn't think white would change the hue of any paint. I don't really want to change the hue I just want to brighten it up a little. Unless someone can recommend a blue brighter than Mica that looks good. I think my monitor make the paint chart brighter than the actual paint.

#4 MAGNUM4342

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:15 PM

It COULD brighten it, but then you run the risk of too much paint buildup. I suggest you strip it and go with a white primer base, or a lighter blue. Remember that the primer color can sometimes alter the hue of a paint. Under most circumstances, a white primer will brighten a color while a black primer will darken said color. (I know, common sense :P ) Rust colored primer is usually reserved for reds and oranges as far as i'm concerned.

 

Another thing you could try is to sand the paint down first, then hit it with white and follow that with the color.

 

A little more info would help here. What paint brand/shade are you using, what was the original primer and what car/color are you trying to duplicate?



#5 rcdave

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:30 PM

I used Duplicolor primer sealer(light tan)and Tamiya Mica blue. I'm just trying to get a blue I really like. I like the blue on this truck I built and wanted to match it but I used Rustoleum to paint it and learned my lesson with that.

#6 rcdave

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:36 PM

I used Duplicolor primer sealer(light tan)and Tamiya Mica blue. I'm just trying to get a blue I really like. I like the blue on this truck I built and wanted to match it but I used Rustoleum to paint it and learned my lesson with that.

Here's the truck.
LosiMicroMonsterV2591024x768.jpg

Edited by rcdave, 05 February 2013 - 03:38 PM.


#7 MAGNUM4342

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:41 PM

Okay then, duplicolor light tan verses white primer won't yield that much of a hue difference. I suggest going with a lighter shade of blue. Do you have an uploadable picture of the blue you want?



#8 rcdave

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 04:24 PM

Okay then, duplicolor light tan verses white primer won't yield that much of a hue difference. I suggest going with a lighter shade of blue. Do you have an uploadable picture of the blue you want?


You must have just missed the pic when you posted. You can see the unavoidable orange peel from the rustoleum.

#9 Guest_G Holding_*

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:07 PM

Mica Blue or Mica red do change colors over different primer base. They will be the brightest, and show the "mica" off best over white, followed by yellow, grey, red, black in that order. Note...gold and silver are close to yellow and grey



#10 rcdave

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:07 PM

Mica Blue or Mica red do change colors over different primer base. They will be the brightest, and show the "mica" off best over white, followed by yellow, grey, red, black in that order. Note...gold and silver are close to yellow and grey


Thanks, that's what I was thinking. Do you think 2 light caots will make a difference? I am worried about the paint getting thick in areas I can't sand.

#11 plowboy

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 04:52 AM

If you like the color you have and just want it to be smoother. Wet sand the orange peel out with 2000 grit sandpaper and shoot a coat of clear over it. Since you've used Rustoleum, I would also brush a coat of Future floor wax over it before spraying the clear.



#12 hooknladderno1

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 05:02 PM

I recently did the old "spoon test" over white, gray, red oxide and black primers to see which one would give me the shade closest to what I was trying to match on some 1:1 replicas.  I always knew that the primer color would make a difference , just not how much!  Boy, was I surprised!  Do yourself a favor, get a pack of plastic spoons at the dollar store, Walmart, etc, and give it a try!  You will be amazed...  The color that I sprayed was Krylon Cherry Red, to match some fire apparatus that my hometown once ran.  Before having "custom paint" mixed up, I thought I'd give it a whirl..  Turned out the gray primer worked best.

picsay-1358910394.jpg



#13 Guest_G Holding_*

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 06:20 PM

Thanks, that's what I was thinking. Do you think 2 light caots will make a difference? I am worried about the paint getting thick in areas I can't sand.

 

 

I was taught by many masters for Tamiya color coats spray 1 misting coat ...almost covers . Wait 15 min to tack apply 2 wet coats, 15 minutes apart. You should have even smooth color now . Then in 15 minutes do the same 3 steps, 15 min apart with TS13 clear. Put aside to dry and cure. I have found this works the best with ALL TAMIYA LACQUER PAINT ....SO now that TS13 is gone, I reverted to waiting 2 days(or dehydrator ) and duplacolor lacquer clear.  I sure missTS13, but the finish will look the same as Tamiya and duplicolor cure together well.

 

I warm all tamiya lacquers with HOT water and seem to have little or no peel, so all clear will lay flat and need minimal polishing using Novus 2


Edited by G Holding, 08 February 2013 - 06:22 PM.