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Z'd, ZEED FRAMES SIMPLIFIED TUTORIAL


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#21 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:11 PM

Easiest way to do that is to use a second frame, which will allow you to make the kicked up portion at the rear longer to compensate for the shortening effect that would otherwise have to happen.

 

Art

 NO NO NO. I do NOT understand why the SIMPLE GEOMETRY of this is so hard to understand.

 

LOOK at the 45 DEGREE cuts in the 6TH PHOTO, and how the cut ends relate to each other when reassembled. THESE CUTS ALLOW THE FRAME TO REMAIN THE SAME LENGTH.

 

If the cuts were made at 90 DEGREES, and the ends overlapped, there WOULD be shortening, BUT NOT AS SHOWN !!!!!

 

WITH 45 DEGREE cuts THERE IS NO SHORTENING. THIS IS SIMPLE HIGH SCHOOL GEOMETRY., common sense and OBSERVATION.

 

WHY must you CONTRADICT CORRECT INFORMATION ??

 

DO the mod AS SHOWN and MEASURE IT !!!!! I have done this MULTIPLE times MYSELF, on REAL chassis AND MODELS and MEASURED IT, it's accepted as correct in the history of hot-rodding and cited in MANY OLD PERIOD ARTICLES. IT WORKS AS STATED.

 

There is NO DAMM SHORTENING !!!!


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 11 May 2013 - 03:19 PM.


#22 David G.

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:18 PM

What a clever and easy way to Z a frame!

 

Thanks for sharing this

 

David G.



#23 JasonFL

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:21 PM

I found your tutorial on another site a long time ago and used it on my 32 5 window ford and have to say it worked great. Everything lined up and was very easy to do. Thanks for posting it again Bill, great tutorial.

#24 southpier

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:26 PM

not understanding. how would the shortening (with the exception of the saw kerf - which is easily remedied) take place?

 

 

I really hope there's no scale arithmetic involved!



#25 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:25 AM

not understanding. how would the shortening (with the exception of the saw kerf - which is easily remedied) take place?

 

 

I really hope there's no scale arithmetic involved!

 

Yes, you don't even lose the width of the saw kerf if you very slightly adjust the final position of the cut parts when you glue them back together. No scale arithmetic required. :)

 

I suggest putting reference marks close to the ends of the rails BEFORE cutting, measure between them, and make sure you have exactly the same measurement when you glue everything back together. B)



#26 southpier

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 02:17 PM

if there's no place where the frame rails are parallel, what's a good way to get a line perpendicular to the centerline of the chassis?  this information could be helpful for a myriad of purposes.

 

thanks



#27 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 04:13 PM

The best way would be to place a small mark on the top of one rail (where it looks like a good place to do the cut), measure the distance of this mark from a fixed point of the rail (like where it intersects a crossmember) with a dial-caliper, and transfer this measurement to the other side of the frame, where you'd make a corresponding mark.

 

A line drawn between these two marks will be perpendicular to the centerline of the chassis. If you're careful, you should be able to get within a few one-thousandths of an inch.



#28 plowboy

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:06 AM

 There is NO DAMM SHORTENING !!!!

 

Are you sure about that Bill? Did you measure your frame with a micrometer or scan it with a lazer before and after you performed these alterations? The chemical reaction between the glue and styrene alone would surely have made the frame at least a few microns shorter. :D

 

Seriously though, if you follow Bill's instructions exactly, you'll have no problems.



#29 GoatGuy

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 02:31 AM

I'm glad I found this info before I cut my '32 frame. Thanks for posting. Makes the process look very easy.



#30 PappyD340

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 02:55 AM

Thanks for the tutorial Bill, will make notes for future reference!! :D