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Stacey David's Rat Roaster Revisited - 3-31 Done! Final Photos and Under Glass Tomorrow


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#21 Bernard Kron

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 03:21 PM

...also your pictures look dreamy with the fogged background.  Would you mind sharing your photo technique?...  

 

Thanks!

 

Without drilling down pretty deep into Photoshop I'll stick to a pretty general outline of what I did for those "dreamy" shots. First off, the original shots were just quick grab shots on my work bench. My work area looks like a bomb hit it, I'm an incredibly messy builder. So when it comes time to grab some shots of work in progress I'll shove tools, paint, parts, etc. out of the way to clear a space and then hide as much of it as possible using a plain sheet of white or black plastic or paper braced vertically, usually leaning up against a paint can or rubbing alcohol bottle. I'll put a second sheet of the same color on the workbench top. My workbench is very brightly lit, with 3 75 watt spotlamps shining on it, so there's plenty of light for photography. I never use a flash.

 

I use the macro setting on my camera (the close up setting) and get in as tight as possible while still including the desired angle, perspective and details I want to include. Most of time the raw pictures still have some details in the background so I need to block them out in some way. So what I do is use the "lasso" tool in Photoshop and draw an encircling shape around the part of the picture I do want to include. Then I "inverse" the selection so I'm actually working with the part of the image I want to get rid of. Now let's say that I am using a white background. I fill the area I'm getting rid of with the same color, in this case white. The "dreamy" effect is the result of "feathering" the edges of the selected area. Feathering is another Photoshop setting that fades the edges of the selected area. You can control how abruptly or gradually you fade in the effect your doing to the selected area. In this case the "dreamy" effect is simply the white fill color overlapping with the image where it fades out, creating a foggy haze.

 

Finally. I crop the image down to a pleasing proportion and save it in an 800 pixel width so it will look OK on most people's monitors.

 

I do other things as well in order to make sure the photos reproduce the color properly and also to make sure that the fill color matches the background color properly, but that's basically what I do... 


Edited by Bernard Kron, 30 March 2013 - 12:58 AM.


#22 Bernard Kron

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 03:00 AM


I thought I’d take some additional time to show the technique I outlined in the previous post. I was shooting a picture of the motor area I plan to use in my Under Glass post and grabbed some additional shots for the Workbench Saturday thread. So I saved some interim shots to illustrate my procedure.

 

My workbench area showing the black plastic background sheets set up for photography.
DSCF1699-workbench-web.jpg

 

The photo I will use as taken by my camera.
DSCF1702-raw-web.jpg

 

The photo as I imported it into Photoshop, having adjusted color, saturation, contrast, etc. to more closely resemble the actual color.
DSCF1702-as-opened-web.jpg

 

The selection area I will process to darken it in order to match the black background.
DSCF1702-selection-area-wed.jpg

 

The selected area filled with black, using the “feather” function to fade it in. In this photo I have outlined the selected area in red. You’ll notice I smoothed the contours of the selection using the “selection/smooth” function in Photoshop to get a more natural flow.
DSCF1702-slection-darkened-web.jpg

 

Here is the same shot as above but without the red line.
DSCF1702-initial-darkening-web.jpg

 

The completed work ready for cropping. I touched up some light spots in the dark background and sharpened up the colors and contrast in the main image. Yes I know, there’s dust on the trunk lid!
DSCF1702-before-cropping-web.jpg

 

The final cropped image.
DSCF1702-final-web.jpg

 

The motor shot I will use in the Under Glass post. I wanted to have an image without the grill shell in place.
DSCF1688-web.jpg



#23 Bernard Kron

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 05:10 PM

All done! Tomorrow it rolls into the studio for some beauty shots and then Under Glass.

 

Thanx for following along,
B.

 

DSCF1709-web.jpg



#24 crazyrichard

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 09:02 PM

came out awsome !!