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1/12 '57 Chevy


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#21 lanesteele240

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 08:57 PM

Ok, im very impressed, but will you please tell me what bolt sizes you used on your engine and which ones you use the most when detailing a build.
I have visted scale hardware's web site but when i get there i'm set aback by all the choices an frankly the prices. I would not mind paying for the ones i can use but i would hate to start out with 130 bucks worth of bolts that i can never use

Any info would be welcome and thanks for sharing your build

#22 ewaskew

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:39 PM

Looks real good man and the extra detail is a great little touch.



#23 Casey

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 10:30 AM

Ok, im very impressed, but will you please tell me what bolt sizes you used on your engine and which ones you use the most when detailing a build.

 

Quite honestly, you use whatever bolt size the real car uses in various places. 3/8" hex head is common for bolting fenders and inner fender to the main body structure, 5/16" or 3/8" for oil pan bolts, 1/2" or 9/16" hex head for water pump bolts, bellhousing to engine block bolts are 9/16" or sometimes 5/8" hex head, and so on. Divide the real hex head dimension/size by the scale you're working in, and pick the closest size RB Motion or Scale Hardware offers. You might only need to use the threaded rod or threaded bolts for things like the motor mounts or control arms, since most of the time only the bolt/nut heads and washers are visible.

 

Looking great on the FI unit, Cameron. That's a lotta plumbing.  :huh:



#24 Bugatti Fan

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 09:53 AM

Regarding making bolts (or rather bolt heads). I looked at proprietary stuff like proper tiny bolts for modellers and also the various photo etched stuff as well.....Too expensive!  Could not find any hexagonal shaped plastic rods to slice, either from Plastruct or any other company and that I found surprising!

I also tried the old heat stretched sprue method on a hexagonal  a bic biro outer case. Stretched it ok but it was too brittle to cut even with a a razor saw.

I needed lots of bolt heads of different sizes. So how could they be made really cheaply and made of plastic so that they could be cemented in place with a spot of Contacta or similar?

Then I hit upon an idea!  Maybe I could punch them out of plastic card? I got a cheap set of Allen keys and selected some of the smaller ones that looked about the right size for the bolt heads that I wanted to make. I hacksawed off the long straight section of each key I needed and ground one end flat to give sharp edges to each side of the hexagon shape. These would become my PUNCHES.

Next job was to make a COMBINATION DIE that would take each size. What I used was a piece of 1.5mm (approx 1/16th inch) gauge plate (mild steel would also do) about 75mm (3 inches) by 50mm (2 inches) then got a a piece of wood battening about 20mm (3/4 inch square) and cut 2 lengths from it of 50mm (2 inches). I drilled 2 holes to take suitable screws at each end of the 3 inch long piece of steel plate. These are to screw the 2 battens to the underside of the steel plate to make a bridge shape once all the die holes are drilled.

Now I drilled a number of suitably sized holes to match each of the punches in the plate positioned in the centre section that would be between the support battens to act as die holes for the punches to go through. To determine each of the hole sizes, I carefully measured the diameter across each of the Allen key pieces from point to opposite point (not across the flats) that were cut from the Allen keys. After drilling a set of holes as dies, I then screwed the bits of batten to each end of the piece of steel plate to form the bridge section. This was to make some clearance for the punched hexagonal plastic card shapes to fall through onto some card that was located underneath. This method is a bit crude, but it works. Basically we are punching a hexagonal punch through a round drilled hole. This will have to be set up on a small bench drill press for accuracy. The selected punch is be mounted in the machine's chuck and brought down to accurately align and go through the corresponding drilled die hole.

The die bridge part will need to be clamped down at this stage. If you have a small milling machine this is much easier as the die can be clamped in a vice or on the machine bed and the X ( RH to LH), and Y (Front to Rear) axis movement handles can be used to accurately align the punch and die required.

This is a very cheap way to knock out loads of plastic card hex bolt heads once the machine is set up. Trial and error will show how thick you can go with the plastic card however.

Hope that this is of help to other modellers.


Edited by Bugatti Fan, 31 May 2013 - 06:57 AM.


#25 AzTom

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 04:53 AM

That engine looks awesome!

 

Someone makes one of those punch dies for hex bolts, I have the one for round holes and it works great.

 

For the record, Plastruck does have the hex rod, that is what I use. 

 

PlastructHex-vi.jpg



#26 crazyrichard

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 06:58 AM

whow awsome work . just looks real :wub:



#27 Bugatti Fan

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:02 AM

Tom,   Thanks for the heads up on the Plastruct Hexagonal Styrene Rod.

            It does not seem to appear on any of the Plastruct racks I have seen in model shops here in the UK.

            I will keep a better weather eye open for it now I know it does exist.

            A company named EMA (Engineering Model Associates) in London seem to be the main importers, so I will try them first.

            The proprietary punch / die tools you mentioned. I have seen them at shows and they are very good (and quite pricey too!)

             However they are precision tools so the cost has to reflect that. It's just a question of how affordable they are.



#28 Darren B

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:03 PM

wow any updates on this , was hoping to see more.....



#29 Ira

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:24 PM

Great Engine!

Wonderful Detailing... B)



#30 Quick GMC

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 09:54 AM

This one is still in the works guys, just very slow. I am more focused on some 1/24 stuff and I just had a baby, so it may be a while. It is not forgotten though. I appreciate all the comments. I am learning these skills as I go, so sometimes I get frustrated not knowing what to do next, so I put it away. I think I will move on to other parts of the car though, so I can make progress on something.



#31 Mike Kucaba

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:09 AM

If this is the 1/12th Chevy it was tooled in the 90's The 1/16th chevies were tooled in the 70's.

 

You probably know by now that many hex bolt heads can be simulated by hex shaped plastic and brass rod.

 

Your work on this is certainly stunning.