Jump to content


Dispelling Modeling Myths


  • You cannot reply to this topic
109 replies to this topic

#21 Art Anderson

Art Anderson

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,977 posts

Posted 07 May 2013 - 06:33 AM

There's a few myths, or maybe "Half-truths" floating around on the forum about how people go about certain meathods or achieve certain results. Some of these may have some folks confused, or even scared to try a new technique. There are a few "myths" that I would like your help to get straightened out, and if you guys can think of more, please post them!

 

#1- Alclad, I've read on several instances where Alclad was hard to work with because of it being so delicate, but I've also read where it's just as tough as kit chrome... so which is it?

 

#2- Scribing open panels, BMF makes a tool just for this, yet guys insist on claiming to use the back-side of a #11 blade (which I can never get to follow the groove). How many of you actually use an Exacto blade to open panels?

 

#3- Fine line masking, again something that can be purchased, but when people ask the painter how they get such fine lines masked, they always come back with the old "stacking of the blades" response...

 

I don't want to start any arguements amongst the members, just would like to bring the truth about some things to light is all! ^_^ 

I see neither truth nor falsehood in any of these so-called "myths", but rather that regardless of tools or materials that may be available, many of us prefer techniques which we have developed over the years, that work well for us.  
 

Bear in mind, not everyone has seen with their own eyes, nor had available locally, many of the tools and materials that can be found in the hobby and related marketplace nowadays.  Additionally, not every modeler likes every possible tool that has come down the pike, being comfortable with the tool or technique that has served them well over time.

 

For some modelers, it's the trip to the finished project that is important, for others, it's the finished project--regardless of the route taken to achieve it.

 

Art



#22 chepp

chepp

    MCM Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:East of Pomona, CA
  • Full Name:Charley Hepperle

Posted 07 May 2013 - 06:45 AM

4. Paint won't stick to polished plastic.



#23 plowboy

plowboy

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,543 posts
  • Location:in the middle
  • Full Name:Roger Hayes

Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:40 AM

Never used Alclad. Never seen any that looked as good as kit chrome. When I need something re chromed, I send it to Dale at LittleMotorKarCo. The few bucks he charges is well worth the effort, time and aggravation I save.

 

I use a razor saw, photo etch saw and occasionally the Xacto blade to open panels with. I get much better results with the razor saw and photo etch saw than I do with the Xacto blade.

 

I use Tamiya tape almost exclusively for masking. I also use the blue painters tape. But, when I do, I always cut a new edge onto it.

 

The scallops on this model were masked with a single piece of 1 1/2" blue painters tape. It also dispells the myth about one part putty shrinking, cracking and falling out since the head light buckets are made entirely from Squadron's white putty. The putty is around 1/4"-3/8" thick in areas. The bars holding them up are glued into holes drilled into the putty. The body work on the chop is also done with white putty. So much for that myth.

 

008-17_zps90abbf77.jpg

 

 

 

  



#24 Greg Myers

Greg Myers

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,639 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Full Name:Gregory Myers

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:27 AM

Now that's a work of art Roger. :o



#25 pharoah

pharoah

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 736 posts
  • Location:Shelbyville,IN
  • Full Name:John Farrow

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:30 AM

Nice build Roger!

 I use Squadron white putty too with no issues.

 

What about the myth that if you ever build the perfect model that you're really happy with,you turn inside out?

Hasn't happened to me and probably won't.  :lol:



#26 johnbuzzed

johnbuzzed

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,175 posts
  • Location:Indian Land, SC
  • Full Name:John "the Buzzard" Buzzerio

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:32 AM

4. Paint won't stick to polished plastic.

I don't think the problem lies with the plastic being polished, rather, it's the chemical(s) in the polish that might cause the paint to not adhere. 



#27 Quick GMC

Quick GMC

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 885 posts
  • Location:Southern California
  • Full Name:Cameron DeMille

Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:59 AM

I think the difference, at least what it appears to me, is that Alclad has the reflection of chrome, but not the brightness, if that makes sense. I can see myself in a piece that is sprayed with Alclad, but when in the sun, chrome will have those blinding, glaring bright spots where the sun hits. Alclad will shine, have a reflection, but not the brightness or glare you get from chrome

 

does that make sense? I think I confused myself. 



#28 Greg Myers

Greg Myers

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,639 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Full Name:Gregory Myers

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:05 AM

Art's got it right.Everybody has different ideas on how to do things. :P



#29 kitbash1

kitbash1

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 393 posts
  • Location:Pickering, Ontario, Canada
  • Full Name:Douglas Graves

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:15 AM

Here's my 2 cents.

 

# 1 Alclad : follow the directions to the letter, and it turns out fine.

 

# 2 : I have alway's used the back of a # 11 X-acto knife to open up doors, trunks and panel lines on plastic. But for resin I use a panel scriber which works great on the resin.

 

# 3 : I use BMF for masking as well as 3M fine line tape and Tamiya masking tapes.



#30 edward smith

edward smith

    MCM Friend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 197 posts
  • Location:Maine
  • Full Name:Edward

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:41 AM

I believe in one thing that never fails.....pictures. You can go on and say that this works or that works but, show me pictures and proof and I am okay.

#31 cruz

cruz

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,614 posts
  • Location:Maryland
  • Full Name:Marcos Cruz

Posted 07 May 2013 - 10:54 AM

When mastered, Alclad works phenomenally but yes, if handled too much it will rub off a bit. On small parts around the engine you will not need to worry but if you are doing bigger things like bumpers, it's best not to handle your model much, at least on those particularly exposed areas.

I use a scriber to start my panel lines but always finish with the Xacto knife. The scriber makes it easier to start the process but the deeper you go, the wider the line will look.

I've always had good luck with Tamiya tape, if you burnish it well and mist your paints while applying them you will not go wrong. Of course, the use of an airbrush when performing this task will definitely work best but if done carefully, even using spray cans will work. BMF is another good alternative.

#32 chepp

chepp

    MCM Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 43 posts
  • Location:East of Pomona, CA
  • Full Name:Charley Hepperle

Posted 10 May 2013 - 01:38 PM

4. Paint won't stick to polished plastic.

 

I don't think the problem lies with the plastic being polished, rather, it's the chemical(s) in the polish that might cause the paint to not adhere. 

 

I figured that more people would comment on this one. To me, the conventional wisdom is that you need some "tooth" on the surface to be painted -- such as scuffing with 400 grit wet-or-dry for a coat of flat primer. On my next model, I'm going to try the polished plastic method and spray on many light coats of diluted gloss paint, skipping the primer.

 

How about posting some more myths?



#33 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 10 May 2013 - 02:03 PM

I use a #11 blade to open panels.  The trick is to go very very slowly at first and use a very light touch (light pressure on the blade).  After a while you can press harder.

 

When masking, hit it with a little bit of clear first.  That way the color coat will not bleed through.  Any bleed through, under the tape, will be clear.

 

Another myth:  You can paint and build a model car from sealed box to finished car in 24 hours.  I am about to check out this myth.  I'm signed up for my model club's 24 hour build fest.

 

 

.



#34 martinfan5

martinfan5

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,234 posts
  • Location:Los Santos, San Andreas
  • Full Name:Jonathan Stephens

Posted 10 May 2013 - 03:25 PM


Another myth:  You can paint and build a model car from sealed box to finished car in 24 hours.  I am about to check out this myth.  I'm signed up for my model club's 24 hour build fest.

 

 

.

Good luck Jim,  are you sure you want to be in the same house for 24 hours with the guys :lol: :lol: :lol:



#35 Tonioseven

Tonioseven

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,849 posts
  • Location:Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Full Name:Antonio Holmes

Posted 10 May 2013 - 05:55 PM

#3. Tamiya tape, Jammydog tape from Scalefinishes.com as well as fine line tape I got from Hobbylink Japan. I don't have the patience to cut fine lines with two hobby blades nor do I care to when there's tape readily available.

 

1-vi.jpg

 

11-vi.jpg

23-vi.jpg

70-vi.jpg

75-vi.jpg

DSCN4616-vi.jpg


Edited by Tonioseven, 10 May 2013 - 05:58 PM.


#36 Shelby 427 1965

Shelby 427 1965

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 544 posts
  • Location:Armagh, Ireland
  • Full Name:Tomo Pattison

Posted 11 May 2013 - 12:14 AM

For #2, I use the BMF scriber tool continuously over the panel lines, and when you look on the other side and can see it about to cut through the plastic, I then use a sharp blade to get a perfect precision cut. Works every time :)

#37 Guest_G Holding_*

Guest_G Holding_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:38 AM

I'm with Tonio.....I use the same as him, and our lines are crisp. I don't do the skinny ones like Tonio showed, but his are killer!



#38 Hollywood Jim

Hollywood Jim

    MCM Avid Poster

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 434 posts
  • Location:Arizona, USA
  • Full Name:Jim F.

Posted 11 May 2013 - 05:12 AM

Good luck Jim,  are you sure you want to be in the same house for 24 hours with the guys :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

 

I am as sure about this as we all are about our next model project coming out perfect.   :lol: :lol:

 

 

.



#39 om617

om617

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,398 posts
  • Location:Norway
  • Full Name:Tommy Olsen

Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:45 AM

For #2, I use the BMF scriber tool continuously over the panel lines, and when you look on the other side and can see it about to cut through the plastic, I then use a sharp blade to get a perfect precision cut. Works every time :)

 

Been scratching my head a while on how i should do this. Will try the BMF tool,thanks.



#40 zenrat

zenrat

    MCM Ohana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 839 posts
  • Location:Mount Martha, Victoria, Australia
  • Full Name:Fred Maillardet

Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:20 PM

...It also dispells the myth about one part putty shrinking, cracking and falling out since the head light buckets are made entirely from Squadron's white putty. The putty is around 1/4"-3/8" thick in areas. The bars holding them up are glued into holes drilled into the putty. The body work on the chop is also done with white putty. So much for that myth.

 

008-17_zps90abbf77.jpg

 

 

 

  

How old is this build?

IMO while one part putty can be sanded smooth and then painted over before it gets a chance to shrink it will shrink given enough time. I;ve got builds in my cabinet that were filled and sanded smooth 5 or 6 years ago but which now exhibit sinking along all the filled seams.

Now I used automotive cellulose knifing putty not something intended for model use but I maintain that a one part putty which dries by evaporation will reduce in volume as the solvent evaporates.

If all the evaporation has occurred before sanding and painting then I can see how no more shrinking would take place but is that going to happen without a long drying time or thin coats?

I don't know.

Good luck with your builds as they age and if you are happy with what you are using then by all means stick to it (after all there is no wrong or right way to do stuff in our hobby - despite what certain posters on this forum I could name think) but I learnt from experience that I prefer a 2 part filler as the 1 part one I was using shrank.


Edited by zenrat, 11 May 2013 - 06:21 PM.