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#1 Harry P.

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:05 AM

This is the Lindberg 1/16 scale 1910 Model T "Torpedo." Here's the kit I started with:

 

lindberg-1910-ford-model-t-car_zpsbd29df

 

 

Henry Ford didn't come up with his famous "any color as long as it's black" idea until much later–early Model Ts were actually available in several colors (red, dark green, dark blue, gray and black, depending on the specific model)… but to me a Model T should be black, so that's what I went with. The kit is very basic and simplified, so I added a few details that were missing.

 

T4_zps22c3fac6.jpg

 

T1_zps3dc79478.jpg

 

 

I replaced the kit's dashboard/firewall with a scratchbuilt one, made of real wood, stained and varnished. I also added real wood floorboards and a scratchbuilt pedal surround and steering column collar. All of the "brass" trim on the firewall is strips of paper painted brass, the brackets connecting the upper and lower parts of the firewall are tiny trips of paper, all "bolt heads" are tiny brass nails (hull planking nails left over from a wooden ship kit).

 

I opened the doors by scribing them with the back side of my X-acto blade. The hinges are made of short lengths of aluminum tube, the hinge pins are more of those brass ship's hull planking nails. The doors really do open now, but I'm afraid the tiny hinges will break if I open and close them too often... so they stay closed!  :D

 

 

I also added the choke control from the dash to the carb. The interior "leather" panels were made by cutting pieces of sheet acetate to fit each interior panel (the area ahead of the doors and the doors themselves, then "sculpting" the leather by laying some Bondo onto the acetate panels and sort of swirling it around. Once the Bondo hardened, I smoothed down the surface with sandpaper, but left a little of the dips and bumps… so it sort of looks like slightly wrinkled or wavy leather. Then I painted the Bondo "leather" panels, popped them off the acetate (Bondo doesn't stick to acetate) and glued them in place. The tiny door latches were scratchbuilt, but they're so small you can hardly even see them on the finished model!

 

T7_zps7bff85f5.jpg

 

T2_zps00e3214e.jpg

 

 

As usual with kits of cars from this era, the "brass" parts have that mirror-finish polished and lacquered look, like brass-colored chrome. That might be fine on a restored show car, but my guess is that most Model T owners didn't keep the brass on their cars in concours condition, so I did my usual trick of spraying all the brass parts with transparent black window tint to tone down the brass and give the parts some depth, then Dullcote over the top to get that look of natural, unpolished brass. In the photos below you can see that my technique on the brass-plated parts comes pretty close to the look of real, unpolished brass (which is what the straps on the gas tank are made of).

 

 

I sanded off the molded-in straps on the gas tank and replaced them with straps made of brass strip. I left them unpainted (they would have been painted body color on the real car). The kit glass was useless… it had swirl marks in the plastic, and it was way too thick… when you place it in the windshield frame it sticks out past the frame… sort of that "coke bottle glasses" look… so I used the kit pieces as templates to make new glass from a sheet of thin Lexan (actually leftover "glass" material from the London Bus I posted a while ago). As you can see, the windshield frames are very thin, there's not a whole lot of margin for error when fitting the glass! I "glued" the glass in place by running some Future into the joint between the edges of the "glass" and the frames.

 

T8_zpsfce473d1.jpg

 

T3_zps93f38a34.jpg

 

 

The engine in the kit is very basic, only 4-5 parts in all. I added the lower radiator hose (not included in the kit) and some basic wiring. The radiator "hoses" are lengths of aluminum tube painted a reddish brown (per some reference photos), and the hose clamps are made of aluminum duct tape.

 

T6_zps42456a2f.jpg

 

T5_zpsbbbe3f79.jpg

 

The tires were painted with automotive interior vinyl dye, and the seats, interior "leather" panels and convertible top boot were painted with acrylic craft paint (very dark gray), then sprayed with transparent black window tint, and finally Dullcote.



#2 sjordan2

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:25 AM

Kudos. Just goes to show that the simplest subject or kit can be turned into a very fine piece of work using the right techniques and elbow grease.



#3 cobraman

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 07:11 AM

Looks very nice. I like how you toned down the brass parts.



#4 jeffs396

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 07:46 AM

Very nicely done Harry!

 

Going that extra mile really brought the build to life B) 



#5 Bonekrosha

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 08:19 AM

Beautiful build !!!

I've got one of these waiting in the wings.
I'm going to either make it a drag car or a Monster Truck-style car.
Either way big nasty motor with as close to a stock body as possible :)

#6 crazyrichard

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:02 AM

ooeeh that is georgeous !!

#7 sjordan2

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:16 AM

A. Is the black window tint available in spray cans?

 

B. What wood did you use, and what did you use to finish it?



#8 lanesteele240

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:28 AM

Im impressed that you made a lendburg kit look as good as any Tamiya.
Great job Mr Sir

#9 crazyjim

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:30 AM

Very nice.  Naturally, I like the SHINY :) :) :)



#10 Kennyboy

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:43 AM

WOW Harry! That looks just amazing. The level of detail is incredible. Good show sir!



#11 Harry P.

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:47 AM

A. Is the black window tint available in spray cans?

 

B. What wood did you use, and what did you use to finish it?

 

A. Yes, it's Testors Transparent Black Window Tint in the typical 3 oz. can. It's sort of a blackish clear... like a mix of 90% clear, 10% black.

 

B. I used basswood for the wood parts, the firewall/dash stained that orangy color per many reference photos I have and "varnished" with Future. The floorboards are basswood strips that I darkened with watered-down black acrylic craft paint... no other finish on them.

 

I like using basswood because it has no visible grain to speak of, so you don't get any out-of-scale grain on a model. Also it's almost white, so you can stain it to look like just about any kind of wood species. And it's soft, so it's easy to shape and sand.



#12 Cato

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 12:01 PM

The tires were painted with automotive interior vinyl dye, and the seats, interior "leather" panels and convertible top boot were painted with acrylic craft paint (very dark gray), then sprayed with transparent black window tint, and finally Dullcote.

 

As usual Harry, you expand the materials and techniques far beyond what such a simple kit provides. Great lesson in creativity.

About that vinyl dye, do you mean 'fabric spray' and is it fragile on the tires??



#13 Harry P.

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 12:31 PM



As usual Harry, you expand the materials and techniques far beyond what such a simple kit provides. Great lesson in creativity.

About that vinyl dye, do you mean 'fabric spray' and is it fragile on the tires??

 

Yeah, they call it interior vinyl and fabric coating. And no, it's not fragile at all. In fact, I tried to rub some off just to see, and nothing. After all, it's meant to be used on interiors (like seats!)... so if it rubbed off easily that would be a real problem! There are many brands, I used this:

 

shw-hvp106_zpsd2ff6d4c.jpg



#14 Cato

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 01:31 PM

Thanks-good tip.



#15 Harry P.

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 03:43 PM

I'm thinking I'll do the tires on my Pocher 1907 Fiat now. WAY cheaper than buying the aftermarket white tires from Marvin!



#16 Danno

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 05:33 PM

Most excellent, Mr. P!



#17 Mr.1/16th

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:39 PM

I love this kit!



#18 Cato

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 01:28 AM

I'm thinking I'll do the tires on my Pocher 1907 Fiat now. WAY cheaper than buying the aftermarket white tires from Marvin!

Hmmmm-idea. For RR, maybe Marvin's black tires ('cause they fit better and cost less) sprayed to white walls with your Dupli-spray... :rolleyes: ;)



#19 sjordan2

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 05:51 AM

Hmmmm-idea. For RR, maybe Marvin's black tires ('cause they fit better and cost less) sprayed to white walls with your Dupli-spray... :rolleyes: ;)

 I thought Marvin had whitewalls for the Rolls.



#20 Cato

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:46 AM

 I thought Marvin had whitewalls for the Rolls.

Yes he does-for $10 more EACH...