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3D printing growing as we speak

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#81 1930fordpickup

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:00 PM

The only thing that is friendly to us is the software . I was working with SLA printed models in 1996 to 1999, this stuff still looks the same to me. It is all layers that need to be filled and sanded. For Harry -VCR'S and CD players prices dropped more in this amount or time.  YES I think it will be a big bonus for us in the future , just not in the next few years. The TDR stuff is great I have a few of there 1/8 scale parts and I like them .Just the price is holding me back for more.  



#82 Chief Joseph

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:05 PM

Eventually the technology may make it to the home but probably in ways we haven't even thought of.

"Hey, kids; what do you want me to print for dinner?  Soylent Red or Soylent Green?"



#83 slantasaurus

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:35 PM

 

Every time the topic is brought up, we get the people who say "it's here, NOW!", and other who continue to say "it's almost here", but you can keep saying that for years.

 

3D printing might be mainstream someday, but look at it like this........The Cubs fans have been saying "Wait until next year" for over 100 years and that's still not here. :P


Edited by slantasaurus, 22 October 2013 - 01:35 PM.


#84 raildogg

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 04:21 AM

I will admit to wanting a 3D printer to add to my shop, but. I am one who would, and could, use one for model parts and other very useful items I would want the very best model of printer available, for a certain price point, that being a Fused Deposition type. Currently they are not at a stage where they are cost effective for home shop use. It is the ,only best way, to "grow" any design modellers would and will buy from and for.  If I wasn't on a fixed retirement income, I might think about a printing service just for scale modellers, the horizons scare me in its enormity.



#85 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:01 AM

Have a company ID or business ?? Would you like a FREE 3D printed sample from a MakerBot to hold in your hands and actually SEE the resolution for yourself?? Apply here...

 

http://pages.makerbo...ign=de_10172013



#86 sjordan2

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:48 AM

If anyone has been following Norm Larson's thread on his 3D-printed Ariel Atom, who is probably more qualified on this subject than anyone else here, I would direct you to this thread for his experience with 3D printing:

http://www.modelcars...ic=69078&page=1

Edited by sjordan2, 24 October 2013 - 11:49 AM.


#87 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 07:03 AM

More real information from the real world, about 3D scan-to-design-to-production. This is an engineering white paper webinar about current tech and capabilities. They ask for some info from you, like company affiliation, etc. Anyone serious about learning more would do well to look at it.

 

http://www.engineeri...ystems-webinar/

 

And here's another readable white paper about how laser scanning actually works. Again, anyone with serious interest in this tech should read it.

 

http://www.engineeri...-line-scanning/



#88 KingSix

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 07:57 PM

In time, 3-D printing will put an end to resin casting, the overall "sketchy" customer service and the ridiculously high prices. Think about it, being able to download a file and print up bodies, parts, even entire kits in the comfort of your own home. Resin casting is the past, the horse and buggy in a top fuel world .. I say bring it on ....



#89 mademan

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:30 AM

In time, 3-D printing will put an end to resin casting, the overall "sketchy" customer service and the ridiculously high prices. Think about it, being able to download a file and print up bodies, parts, even entire kits in the comfort of your own home. Resin casting is the past, the horse and buggy in a top fuel world .. I say bring it on ....

It sounds all well and good, and the last post you made about this in the resin section, you said the " ridiculous price of resin" ..... if you are complaining about the price of resin...... 3d printing is not for you.  I speak from experience, owning a number of 3d printed parts, 1 off items etc...... people complain about a 80.00 resin KIT from modelhaus........ some of these wheel sets just for 4 wheels are 35.00.  So now you have a 3d printer in the comforts of your own home... excellent. Well a regular ink cartridge for most computers is around 35.00 + ..... how much will a cartridge of printing product ( abs, etc.) cost to be able to operate your printer?



#90 KingSix

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:48 AM

It sounds all well and good, and the last post you made about this in the resin section, you said the " ridiculous price of resin" ..... if you are complaining about the price of resin...... 3d printing is not for you.  I speak from experience, owning a number of 3d printed parts, 1 off items etc...... people complain about a 80.00 resin KIT from modelhaus........ some of these wheel sets just for 4 wheels are 35.00.  So now you have a 3d printer in the comforts of your own home... excellent. Well a regular ink cartridge for most computers is around 35.00 + ..... how much will a cartridge of printing product ( abs, etc.) cost to be able to operate your printer?

 

Depends on the media you're using, but roughly he same $$ amount. That coupled with the "hit & miss" communication and generally poor customer service from most resin casters, it's worth the extra money to me. I hate ordering something, then finding out after I pay , it'll be 6-8 weeks before you receive your item . If you get any communication at all. I understand that most casters do it as a "side business" but that doesn't exclude them from having good business practice, which includes keeping inventory, keeping amount of product current with what you have listed in your catalog/website etc etc .. I'm not saying all casters are like this, but more often than not, you get stuck waiting .. 



#91 Tom Geiger

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:40 AM

It sounds all well and good, and the last post you made about this in the resin section, you said the " ridiculous price of resin" ..... if you are complaining about the price of resin...... 3d printing is not for you.  I speak from experience, owning a number of 3d printed parts, 1 off items etc...... people complain about a 80.00 resin KIT from modelhaus........ some of these wheel sets just for 4 wheels are 35.00.  So now you have a 3d printer in the comforts of your own home... excellent. Well a regular ink cartridge for most computers is around 35.00 + ..... how much will a cartridge of printing product ( abs, etc.) cost to be able to operate your printer?

 

Agreed!  The cost of 'printing out' a complete kit would be higher than you pay for resin today.  And the provider wouldn't be giving you the file for free, it would be a pay for download situation, not unlike buying software from the Internet.

 

The technology will go through a few stages of integration within the hobby.  As said in this thread, the very best equipment will still be expensive and used in industry. The people in the hobby who debut it will be trained folks from industry who have access to this equipment professionally.  I've been printing my own decals since 1988 or so, long before people had home computers and printers. I had a professional CAD system at work where I drew the decals, and an HP pen plotter that I printed them on with real ink pens. Same kind of situation.

 

At first this technology will be used to create masters for resin casters. They will either have the skill to create the drawing file and print out the master, or will pay others with the skills and equipment to do so.   The second stage will be buying parts that were created by 3D printers from others just like you buy resin or photo etch today.  They will either mail them to you, or send the file to your local Staples store to print it locally for you.  The aftermarket company may be able to modify the parts to your needs.  Maybe they can print it out as a 1/24 scale instead of 1/25 scale.  Maybe they'll be able to modify a wheel from 5 lug to 4 for you as a special order.

 

And yes, somewhere down the road you will be able to create your own 3D artwork and print from your own 3D printer in your home. It won't be as commonplace as a VCR or microwave oven, as those are everyday consumer devices that are easy to use. It will be as common as knowing someone who owns a lathe today. I know I won't have one because I don't have enough of a need. Today my own color inkjet printer dries up because I don't use it all that often.  My 3D printer use would probably go the same way if I had one.

 

There will be a cutting edge of the technology in the hobby, very much the same way people have pioneered other disciplines. There will be guys who will invest the time and money into having the latest and greatest and will  develop the skills to create amazing things.  This will open up a whole new level at model car shows. 

 

And once model cars and computer work is combined like this, maybe this will be the thing that interests young folks in the hobby!



#92 bbowser

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 12:28 PM

Check out this slideshow on Computerworld, 3D printers for less than $500 right now.  It's closer than we think.

 

http://www.computerw...lyam_2013-11-14



#93 sjordan2

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 05:22 AM

Saw an article on this in today's paper. Urbee, the first 3d-printed car (body and interior):

 

http://korecologic.com/



#94 Chuck Most

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 05:37 AM

Saw an article on this in today's paper. Urbee, the first 3d-printed car (body and interior):

 

http://korecologic.com/

I don't remember which issue (it was fairly recent) but Car and Driver did a small article on that car and spoke with its builder.



#95 KingSix

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 06:11 AM

 

Agreed!  The cost of 'printing out' a complete kit would be higher than you pay for resin today.  And the provider wouldn't be giving you the file for free, it would be a pay for download situation, not unlike buying software from the Internet.

 

The technology will go through a few stages of integration within the hobby.  As said in this thread, the very best equipment will still be expensive and used in industry. The people in the hobby who debut it will be trained folks from industry who have access to this equipment professionally.  I've been printing my own decals since 1988 or so, long before people had home computers and printers. I had a professional CAD system at work where I drew the decals, and an HP pen plotter that I printed them on with real ink pens. Same kind of situation.

 

At first this technology will be used to create masters for resin casters. They will either have the skill to create the drawing file and print out the master, or will pay others with the skills and equipment to do so.   The second stage will be buying parts that were created by 3D printers from others just like you buy resin or photo etch today.  They will either mail them to you, or send the file to your local Staples store to print it locally for you.  The aftermarket company may be able to modify the parts to your needs.  Maybe they can print it out as a 1/24 scale instead of 1/25 scale.  Maybe they'll be able to modify a wheel from 5 lug to 4 for you as a special order.

 

And yes, somewhere down the road you will be able to create your own 3D artwork and print from your own 3D printer in your home. It won't be as commonplace as a VCR or microwave oven, as those are everyday consumer devices that are easy to use. It will be as common as knowing someone who owns a lathe today. I know I won't have one because I don't have enough of a need. Today my own color inkjet printer dries up because I don't use it all that often.  My 3D printer use would probably go the same way if I had one.

 

There will be a cutting edge of the technology in the hobby, very much the same way people have pioneered other disciplines. There will be guys who will invest the time and money into having the latest and greatest and will  develop the skills to create amazing things.  This will open up a whole new level at model car shows. 

 

And once model cars and computer work is combined like this, maybe this will be the thing that interests young folks in the hobby!

 

 

    Alumilite White (Amazing Casting Resin) 2 gal. White  $114 plus shipping .. still need a "master" , still need material to make the mold , vessels to mix and measure , all of this incurs more cost and TIME. When you are done you'll have a finished product that will undoubtedly need more clean up than a 3-D printed part. Again, we're back to this "time" thing. You're also going to get a limited amount of casting before the mold is no longer usable and you're back to square one. 

 

    3-D printing filament is currently $31 a roll from Amazon.com , a "decent" 3-D printer is in the $500 -$1500 price range. The FlashForge 3D printer which is currently $1200 also from Amazon is a pretty good machine, is stand alone, meaning you just plug in the file and go and will print in a range from 0.01 to 0.03 mm, giving you an undoubtedly cleaner final product than resin casting will. ( while the initial price may be daunting, the cot will offset itself quickly, depending on how much casting you do ) Now, as far as the files go, there are PLENTY of 3-D files out there that are easily converted to work with a 3-D printer, a lot of them are free, some are not. But, once the file is yours , you can print to your hearts content . Also you can "reverse engineer" files from video games to get different body styles or mod them to make them your own . 

 

I wonder, did people fight change like this when indoor plumbing was invented ? They did with the TV, VCR, DVD etc etc .. but look at where they are now ? Support will undoubtedly grow as this technology progresses. I see it this way. You can either accept it, embrace it, or get out of the way. It's pretty simple.


Edited by KingSix, 16 November 2013 - 06:11 AM.


#96 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 10:02 AM

 

 

    Also you can "reverse engineer" files from video games to get different body styles or mod them to make them your own . 

 

 

 

Yes, and Pico Elgin of the ACME club has already done just this with his Lamborghini 350 / 400 GT. The early Lambo isn't available anywhere in either styrene or resin.

 

 

 

 

  I wonder, did people fight change like this when indoor plumbing was invented ? They did with the TV, VCR, DVD etc etc .. but look at where they are now ? Support will undoubtedly grow as this technology progresses. I see it this way. You can either accept it, embrace it, or get out of the way. It's pretty simple.

 

 

Yes, change is always resisted energetically for some odd reason. If the energy expended by naysayers was put into forward-thinking, humanity would be a LOT farther along. I'll never understand.


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 16 November 2013 - 10:05 AM.


#97 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 10:14 AM

You can also probably count on your fingers and toes the number of folks on the planet who have the ability AND the interest to make a GOOD master for resin casting. Little things like poor accuracy and lack of symmetry spoil many attempts. 3D modeling and printing will allow vastly improved product output with a less-demanding skillset than ever before...much like computer illustration has allowed artists who simply don't have the eye-hand coordination to produce work using traditional materials and methods, but who DO have an appreciation of form, style, color and composition, to produce some breathtaking stuff.

 

Traditional prototyping and machine-shops have been resisting the trend towards this technology, but the ones who will be in business in 10 or 20 years are taking it seriously and embracing its capabilities. Whether for making accurate masters for resin casting, developing prototypes for injection-molding, or straight print-from-file output, it's coming, and it will make models better.

 

I personally don't think that 3D printing will REPLACE injection-molding for mass-market output, any more than carbon-fiber will ever replace steel. Different materials and technologies have their own particular strengths. BUT, 3D modeling and printing in a vast range of materials for a wide range of applications is already having a major impact on the world as we know it, whether we know it or not.


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 16 November 2013 - 10:28 AM.


#98 KingSix

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 10:23 AM

You can also probably count on you fingers and toes the number of folks on the planet who have the ability AND the interest to make a GOOD master for resin casting. Little things like poor accuracy and lack of symmetry spoil many attempts. 3D modeling and printing will allow vastly improved product output with a less-demanding skillset than ever before...much like computer illustration has allowed artists who simply don't have the eye-hand coordination to produce work using traditional materials and methods, but who DO have an appreciation of form, style, color and composition, to produce some breathtaking stuff.

 

Traditional prototyping and machine-shops have been resisting the trend towards this technology, but the ones who will be in business in 10 or 20 years are taking it seriously and embracing its capabilities. Whether for making accurate masters for resin casting, developing prototypes for injection-molding, or straight print-from-file output, it's coming, and it will make models better.

 

Which is why I am spending so much time looking into setting something up.. guys like Pico are already way ahead ... but after seeing the wheels & Lambo body he had at Smyrna , I'd say he's on the right path. Having the ability to make drastic or not so drastic changes on a computer monitor vs. sculpting and re-sculpting .. it's pretty much a no brainer .. no waste, much faster time from concept to prototype to production, having the option of buying the file & printing it yourself or sending it to a company to have it printed .. it's coming, whether you like it or not .. and it will be a game changer ..  



#99 Ace-Garageguy

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 10:35 AM

Another real-world-focused article that might be of interest...a not too difficult extrapolation of material presented here is that 3D printing of METAL tools for injection-molding mass-market products (models included) is entirely within reason.

 

http://www.deskeng.c...cles/aabmxc.htm


Edited by Ace-Garageguy, 16 November 2013 - 10:37 AM.


#100 bbowser

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 10:42 AM

Great article Bill, thanks for sharing.  I am just blown away by the accelerating pace of developments with this technology (as well as everything thing else).  Is the world speeding up or am I slowing down?  Never mind, I already know that answer :(