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gold nugget w900 1/16: update 8/22 - Epilogue


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#61 Pete_Fan

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:09 AM

Nice interior! And nice dash on the Pete!

#62 olsbooks

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 03:45 PM

Just a quick update.  Just a masking tape put together.  Panel fit will be better once permanently set "in" the doors.  And finally got the door to cab fit decent.  Lots and lots of fussing, sanding, filling and sanding.  Primary paint exterior is a Valspar metallic aged copper from Lowes.  Pretty darn close.  So the door jambs, frames, and cab interior/firewall is now painted.  It is not a smoothe flowing paint going on and gets worse as it dries .  Lots of sparkle though and some ultra ultra fine wet sanding and polish should smoothe it out before the gold, brown, and black followed by clear.

 

Just got to get motivated on the instrument panel...

 

Merry CHRISTmas to all.

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#63 Bennyg

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:38 PM

Looking good.

Ben

#64 olsbooks

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 01:04 AM

Well fooling around with the lighted instrument panel begins and amazingly holds great potential.  If I can just measure and drill the holes right, this is going to work well.  Basically I am creating a laminate. The idea was "stolen" from how they used to do headlights on toy trains decades ago.

 

 A layer of white plastic, a layer of clear, drill the holes for the gauges  and then "solid" layer white for the backing.  Put black on the edges of the clear that you do not want light entering or exiting from to help "bottle it" to where you want it to go. 

 

Measuring and drilling is going to be key to getting this to look good.  (isnt it always?).  The photo below shows a first experiment off a single bright blue/white LED.  I plan to put the gauge "faces" on the backside piece of laminate.  Depth of the gauge face is going to be the make or break of this so more playing around will be required but it seems to hold alot of potential.  Thinner is better but the clear sheet needs to be as thick as possible to send more light.

 

LOTS of work ahead on this part but the foundations seem to be there.   

 

I encourage those of you especially with good eyes and tooling to look into this and give it a try. 

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Edited by olsbooks, 18 December 2013 - 01:11 AM.


#65 olsbooks

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:45 PM

Well, this might just turn out far easier than anticipated.....Famous last words.  Sorry about the fuzzy pic but no tripod and a flash would wash out the lighting.  Simply lightly glue a scrap of styrene on the backside of the existing dash. This will become the template for the clear plastic.  I then drilled through the gauges. Remove the template and use it as the guide for the clear.  Put a piece of black paper on the back of the clear for the backing once done drilling.   With the black paper on the back of just the clear, I am free to draw/paint in the gauge faces accurately and can still move forward with the dash itself and detail it out without fear of messing something up.  Granted a thinner "visible" dash built from scratch would look better but the cons outweigh the pros of scratchbuilding  for me at this time. Anyway, once the clear and backing is done and the "visible" instrument panel is done, a bit of cement to marry the two should do just fine.  I might play with putting a second LED on the lower left side somewhere to even out the lighting but space is very limited

 

Surely somebody has done this before. Even on 1/25 this should work.  Since most semi's are flat panels, all the better. Some gentle heat will bend the clear without affecting its light carrying qualities as that how I am doing the backside of this one.  That way the LED can be placed slightly away from the instrument panel to avoid any possible light bleed and aimed for maximim brightness..

 

Again, sorry about the fuzziness of the pix.  But hopefully you get the idea.. 

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Edited by olsbooks, 18 December 2013 - 12:50 PM.


#66 Bennyg

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 08:04 PM

Love this project. I plan to use your ideas on my Peterbilt.

Ben

#67 olsbooks

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 01:52 AM

A loose mockup.  This trick for the lighting the gauges has worked extremely well and has been far easier than anticipated.  The biggest trick is placement of the LED and making sure it does not bleed or leak light to where you dont want it.  I used some thin foil it to "bounce" the light back where I wanted it.  Sadly, pix will not show it well but I am just tickled with this. A 5mm high itensity white does just fine and I will route the fiber optics from the door panel lights to the same LED.  It is enough to catch your attention but does not stand out like a soar thumb.  Subtle.  More work to do finishing it off is required but you get the idea.

 

Probably the toughest thing was painting the gauge "rings" silver.  For those that have the tools and skills to fab a "thin" dash (the visible part) an airbrush with Alcad chrome, it would take this up to the next level.

 

Good luck with it Benny!  Look forward to seeing that Pete lit up.

 

 

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#68 olsbooks

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 10:55 AM

Perhaps a silly question as I never drove a KW of this vintage. 

 

The model column has 3 "levers" on it.  2 on the left side and both are "heavy". I understand turn signals on the left and and trailer brakes on the right.  Is the other one supposed to be a lever to tilt or telescope the wheel?  Reason being as in the kit, there is either wires or plumbing going to all 3 which makes no sense to me if indeed a tilt or telescope and in checking prototypes, have not found nothing like it.

 

Help please. Thanks

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#69 Kenny B

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 05:06 AM

Perhaps a silly question as I never drove a KW of this vintage. 

 

The model column has 3 "levers" on it.  2 on the left side and both are "heavy". I understand turn signals on the left and and trailer brakes on the right.  Is the other one supposed to be a lever to tilt or telescope the wheel?  Reason being as in the kit, there is either wires or plumbing going to all 3 which makes no sense to me if indeed a tilt or telescope and in checking prototypes, have not found nothing like it.

 

Help please. Thanks

Looking good Jesse.

I want to say that the third lever is the brake saver.

 

Kenny B.



#70 olsbooks

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:55 PM

Sorry about the typo Kenny B. 

 

Merrry CHRISTmas and thanks for the encouragement.  It is truly appreciated. 

 

Hope to get the steering column and shifter done but that will be about it thru Jan.  Going for a spicer shifter (see below) as I always liked those.  Prototypically correct?   No... but the tranny on this kit may wind up disappearing anyway. Instead that area may become the "hub" for the exterior fiber optics. 

 

I plan to be using at least two different voltage systems between bulbs and LEDs and want to keep the systems on totally isolated power sources.  Plans are put the batteries inside the fuel tanks and DIP switch panels for individual light controls inside the battery boxes.  I am toying with the idea of smoke generators in each stack if I can find some junk toy steam engines but that is a ways away.  Maybe even a little sound chip with Cat engine idling???.

 

Making the shifter base boot like KW used instead of the supplied Pete style is going to be a challenge cutting about a dozen little circles of different diameter and stacking them.  Then whiddling up a spicer knob.  These are the kinds of things that really are hardest for me.  Blind in one eye and cant see out the other...  :o

 

Again, Merry CHRISTmas to all and to all a good night.

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#71 olsbooks

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 10:10 AM

Had a bit of time and started on the steering wheel and column as well as the shifter.  New air lines and wires made out of cheap single strand wire.   For the shifter,I just took a chunk of sprue and then hacked off the top of a round head machine screw for the "knob.   And just used layers of scrap plastic stacked to make the large shifter boot.

 

A little clean up, painting and routing of the shifter air lines and it should work.  Anyway, a day (w/flash) and night (no flash) photo of the instrument panel just to give you an idea.  The graphic on the dash between the center gauges and right gauges is just a personal expression of my faith and something I like to put somewhere subtly in pretty much everything I put any serious work in. 

 

So I just kinda "set" everything in loose for the pix here.  More touch up and clean up required obviously...but getting there.  Isn't it nice  how if I blow the pix up to 2-3x actual size for posting here, it shows flaws I otherwise never would find? Back to work! :huh:

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Edited by olsbooks, 23 December 2013 - 11:52 AM.


#72 dad vader

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 05:51 AM

Yes the third lever on the steering column is for the Cat Brakesaver. Brakesavers were hydraulic converters attached to the back of the engine,to slow thw drive train down. This was before the days of the exhaust brakes.



#73 olsbooks

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 12:19 PM

Thanks much.  Learn something new every day.   Heard of them but never played hands on with one or familiarized myself with how it worked or was configured for the driver.

 

Thanks again.



#74 dad vader

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 05:44 PM

Thanks much.  Learn something new every day.   Heard of them but never played hands on with one or familiarized myself with how it worked or was configured for the driver.

 

Thanks again.

I started wrenching on big trucks in 1982,at 18 years old. The last Brakesaver I worked on was in a 1979 w900. A heavy equipment company had a whole fleet of them. Basically it is a big torque converter,it takes engine oil directly from the engine oilpan,(that is what the two large oil lines running from the oil pan to flywheel housing on the kits 3408T Are for) It functions just like a torque converter on an automatic trans does,only in reverse.

 

The lever is an air lever that controls a hydraulic valve usually bolted to the engine flywheel housing above the left motor mount and controls the flow of oil to the control port on the brakesaver. (I dont see that valve anywhere in the kit or the Peterbilt kit either) It was really complicated,they leaked alot as the truck aged,and the unit was VERY heavy. I for one am very glad the went away. They were a pain in the butt to work on.

 

Just trying to put the info out there.



#75 olsbooks

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:02 AM

That is very interesting.  I have not done hardly anything on the engine but noticed how odd the oil pan was and knew there was some reason for it.  Rattling the memory banks I now think I recall seeing "Cat Brake Saver" vaguely on the spec books we used which listed all the options. Or maybe I am thinking of some sort of tag on the hood of other makes .   We were GMC mostly for big fleets. Cats...much less all gussied up with high dollar and heavy bells, buttons, and whistles like this were almost unheard of back then.

 

Thanks again for sharing.  You guys got my curiousity up on this thing now so a detour to the old manuals is in order.  I found this and yup, it looks like a pipefitters nightmare.

 

 

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#76 olsbooks

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:15 AM

Seeking advice again...on the sleeper.

 

I want to take this thing down to a single bunk sleeper but have real concerns about keeping the right shape and curvature of the roof panel.  Trying to do this looks very intimidating for a guy with minimal tools and bad vision.  I am thinking if I do this to whack out of the middle but without a flat surface on the entire piece, being so visible, then being painted metallic bronze to boot, am really getting jittery about it. 

 

Any advice or has anyone done this and been truly pleased with the end results?



#77 Bennyg

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 12:41 AM

Good progress on the interior.

Ben

#78 olsbooks

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 01:07 AM

While hacking the sleeper roof down to a single bunk sits on the back burner waiting for a moment of revelation, I finished up the shifter. And based on some work seen by others here, took a stab at making the front axle steerable.  At least on 1/16 scale, it is going much easier than anticipated.  Just drill straight through completely.  Then make the cuts, a little clean up, and then insert a straight pin.  The tie rod was a little more tricky but basically the same.  We will see what happens when I go to put in the linkages to the steering box.. :blink:

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#79 olsbooks

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 05:28 PM

Let me say I really appreciate the recent PM's received and especially those from the newer guys.  I will continue to try to explain how I come up with this stuff.  There are far better and more professional ways out there.  True masterpieces.  Sometimes my low budget "bubble gum and bailing wire" tricks work. Sometimes not.  My whole thing is to pull off something just a little "better" than the box with limited budget, tooling and abilities. 

 

 

Dinking around with the tires and wheels just to move on to something else for a while.

 

I dont know if it is just this particular kit, but the quality of the chrome plating is just horrid.  It is so thin that just a gentle wipe with soft rag to remove dust, it starts to go to the black.  Well, Alclad is not an option so an improv was in order.

 

Plans were to weather this thing like a 2-3 year old rig anway thankfully.  So, a little trick was conjured up that worked pretty well.  I wanted to make the fine machining groves in the wheels visble somehow but not risk destroying what was left of the chrome as I wanted to keep the shine as a base.  I wound up "dusting" a wheel with cheap alumiminum spray paint.  I then took a fairly stiff wide paint brush, dipped in in brush cleaner, shook out the excess and proceeded to hold the brush and "spin" the wheel between my thumb and forefinger and essentially smear the paint and recreate the grooves.  For an aluminum wheel that has been on an off a couple of times and seen a couple of hundred thousand miles it will pass.  A bit of diluted black around the lugs along with a few streaks here and there and a final dusting of chalk produced some decent results.  A little more work on the streaks is in order but the black is water based acrylic anyway so it will rinse off for a second try.

 

And picking up on what some others have done here, it was time to try sanding tires.  I scraped the casting ridge and then used a throw away emory board/nail file on the treads and rounded the edges a bit...especially on the front tires.  The sidewalls and then the whole tire was then sanded gently with 1000 grit.   

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Edited by olsbooks, 27 December 2013 - 05:48 PM.


#80 Old Buckaroo

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 08:01 PM

Nice interior! And nice dash on the Pete!

 

Yes , very skilled work on both. Looks super.